Ryan Torrens says he’ll allow local gun control laws – Florida Politics

Ryan Torrens says he’ll allow local gun control laws

If elected, Democratic Attorney General candidate Ryan Torrens says he would not enforce Florida law that prohibits cities and counties from enacting their own gun-control ordinances.

Local officials who do enforce them can face a $5,000 fine.

“It is blatantly clear that Gov. (Rick) Scott and our state Legislature are not willing to lift a finger to set in place any common-sense gun reforms,” Torrens said. “So, if the leaders of Broward County are ready to take action to protect (their) children and families, then I am going to support those efforts.”

The original law banning local gun policies was passed in 1987. The 2011 update exposed local officials to penalties for enforcing prompted ordinances.

Mayors from some of Florida’s biggest cities have complained about the legislation for years, most prominently being Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, a Democrat and gun owner himself, who decried how the law prevented him from banning guns in downtown Tampa during the 2012 Republican National Convention.

If elected as the state’s chief legal officer, Torrens promises not to pursue local officials for putting in place what he calls reasonable ordinances to keep their communities safe.

“This law is an illegal encroachment on the authority of localities to achieve the very compelling interest of protecting their children and families, especially when we have a state legislature that always puts the National Rifle Association (NRA) and their own reelection before the safety of our children,” Torrens said.

On Tuesday, every Republican member of the House present on the floor voted against a proposal to bring a stalled assault rifle ban, pushed by Orlando Democrat Carlos G. Smith, out of committee and up for a vote.

“We know special interest money has corrupted our politics. Now, it is abundantly clear that the influence of special interest groups like the NRA is not just corrupting, but deadly,” Torrens said. “The Florida GOP should immediately return all contributions from the NRA and stand up for what is right – protecting our children, families, and first responders.”

His stance is by far the most progressive of anyone entering the race.

The 32-year-old Hillsborough County attorney was the first Democrat to enter the contest in 2018. Current Republican Attorney General Pam Bondi is term-limited this year.

He’s since been joined by Tampa state Rep. Sean Shaw, a Democrat who has kept a relatively low profile on the campaign front since declaring his candidacy last month.

The four Republicans in the race—state Reps. Frank White, Ross Spano and Jay Fant, and former Hillsborough County Circuit Judge Ashley Moody—have previously spoken enthusiastically about gun rights.

In fact, Fant has claimed that Moody has been insufficiently pro-Second Amendment in her record as a judge.

Mitch Perry has been a reporter with Extensive Enterprises since November of 2014. Previously, he served five years as political editor of the alternative newsweekly Creative Loafing. Mitch also was assistant news director with WMNF 88.5 FM in Tampa from 2000-2009, and currently hosts MidPoint, a weekly talk show, on WMNF on Thursday afternoons. He began his reporting career at KPFA radio in Berkeley and is a San Francisco native who has lived in Tampa since 2000. Mitch can be reached at mitch.perry@floridapolitics.com.
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