Andy Gardiner Archives - Page 5 of 35 - Florida Politics

Uber drops off thousands of pro-ridesharing petitions to Andy Gardiner

A representative of Uber personally delivered what he said were 32,588 petitions to Senate President Andy Gardiner on Thursday morning, continuing the intensifying fight between Senate leadership and the ride-hailing industry. They have sparred for months over insurance regulations and the preemption of local ordinances.

The two parties are locked in a heated debate over whether the Senate should vote on a House-approved supportive “ridesharing” plan sponsored by Sen. Jeff Brandes. Their other option is to take up a more modest bill that would settle outstanding sticking points on insurance that was written by Senate Rules Chairman David Simmons. Uber favors the former, while the latter appears more likely at this stage.

Simmons represents the Orlando area as does Gardiner, who has ties to the traditional taxi and limousine firm Mears Transportation. Pro-Uber critics of the Senate have made much of that fact in recent days.

As he delivered the 3-feet-high pile of signatures, Uber’s Director of Public Affairs for the Southeast Colin Tooze said the signatures gathered from Uber riders and drivers across the state shows the public is behind their cause.

The show of support is in addition to the will of the Florida House, who passed the bill 108-10 with bipartisan support, Tooze said.

Tooze added major stakeholder groups such as the Florida Chamber of Commerce, Associated Industries of Florida, and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Several Florida mayors have also voiced their support for what Tooze called “comprehensive ridesharing legislation.”

“All they’re asking for is one simple thing: for a vote on ridesharing in the state Senate,” he said.

“On Monday Senate President Gardiner said the best advice he ever got was not to fear the debate,” said Tooze. “That’s all that the 32,588 Floridians who signed this petition … are asking for.”

Uber continued to add a pointed personal bent to their argument with Gardiner, creating a hashtag – #DontFearTheDebate – and urging supporters to tweet to senators appending the tag. The firm says thousands of people have done so in the past day.

“It’s time for the voices of the people of Florida to be heard and it’s time for a vote on ridesharing in the Florida Senate today,” Tooze concluded.

Email Insights: Uber calls on customers to demand a Senate vote

It’s the last call for ride-hailing legislation.

A bill (SB 1118) to set minimum insurance requirements for ride-hailing companies, like Uber, is once again on the Senate’s special order calendar. So is a similar House proposal (HB 509) that addresses insurance requirements and deals with preemption concerns.

With just days left in the legislative session, there isn’t much time left for lawmakers to take up the proposal. And on Thursday, Uber called on customers to tell the Senate to take a vote.

“We need you,” the company said in an email to customers. “For the first time ever, the State Senate is scheduled to debate and hold a vote on a comprehensive ridesharing bill today. We need your help to ensure every Floridian has secure access to Uber.”

The email goes on to say that “one man, Senate President Andy Gardiner” has stood in the way of legislation for years and “he could stop this debate at any minute.”

“Because Senator Gardiner has taken tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from the taxi industry and their allies, we honestly don’t know what to expect,” the company said in an email. “But you can help make the Senate vote to secure access to Uber across Florida.”

Uber has been targeting Gardiner in recent days, releasing several advertisements aimed at the Orlando Republican.

The House proposal, sponsored by Rep. Matt Gaetz, overwhelmingly cleared the House earlier this session. But Gardiner has said there isn’t a companion bill in his chamber, since the Senate proposal, sponsored by Sen. David Simmons, doesn’t address preemption.

Legislature passes new strictures on abortion clinics

The Florida Senate on Wednesday passed a bill that critics say would curtail women’s access to safe and legal abortions, while supporters say it simply “gets Florida out of the abortion business.”

The measure to increase medical requirements on abortion clinics, sponsored by Lakeland Republican Sen. Kelli Stargel, passed 25-15 after nearly half an hour of debate.

After the Senate removed language pledging the state’s commitment to an “unborn child’s right to life,” which many legal observers could have added further constitutional complications,” the House then approved the same measure 76-40.

House Democrats used the request to accept the Senate’s changes to once again call on lawmakers to oppose the legislation.

Just like the yesterday’s successful discussion on the bill, which also removes funding for any state contract with women’s health providers that also provide abortions, the debate brought out deeply personal sentiments.

Democrat Sen. Bill Montford spoke about counseling pregnant high school students and their families when he was principal of a high school in Tallahassee.

“It was the most personal, most difficult decision a young woman could make. And I don’t think we ought to sit here and dictate to them how they ought to make it,” said Montford.

Fellow North Florida lawmaker Republican Sen. Alan Hays had an equally adamant but diametrically opposed point of view. He likened abortion to murder, and the United States Supreme Court’s policy of allowing it to mass murder.

“If any world leader called for the killing of 10,000 people in their country, we’d be up here screaming ‘genocide!’ Hays exclaimed. “But here in America, millions of babies have been killed in the womb. If abortion isn’t genocide, I don’t know what it is.”

While House debate on the bill focused more strictly on the requirements on clinics written into the bill – they must have admitting privileges to or a “transfer agreement” with a nearby hospital – some senators like Hays and Sen. Rob Bradley among others couched the debate in terms of outright opposition to abortion.

Sen. Jeff Clemens thanked them for their candor, which he said helped reveal to the public and to future courts reviewing the bill its true intentions.

“They were brave enough to get up here today and let everybody know this bill is about restricting a woman’s right to choose. And I think that’s going to be important because when the Supreme Court rejects this bill – like they’ve rejected bill after bill after bill in the past 16 years – the court is going to be able to look at intent and understand that,” said Clemens. “So I appreciate that honesty.”

Stargel said Clemens was essentially knocking on an open door when it comes to supporters’ intentions.

“Would I like a bill that bans abortion? Sure. But we can do that because it’s unconstitutional,” said Stargel.

Democrat Sen. Maria Sachs reminded her colleagues that legal abortion is the law of the land in the U.S. under Roe v. Wade, and that by limiting Florida women’s access to the procedure, they are only placing a burden on women. She pointed to Texas and other southern states, where inquiries into unsafe homemade pregnancy terminations are on the rise.

Having already passed the House, the bill now moves to the desk of Gov. Rick Scott for his likely signature.

Following the debate, Senate President Andy Gardiner made a rare comment from the rostrum, thanking Stargel for carrying the bill.

Though known by Tallahassee standards as a relative moderate on policy issues, he is strongly opposed to abortion.

“It was mentioned earlier that over the last 16 years, it seems like every year we do a pro-life bill” said Gardiner.

“I’m leaving and I’m glad we did that.”

Uber taking its fight with Andy Gardiner, Mears Transportation, home to Orlando

Uber is hitting Senate President Andy Gardiner and Mears Transportation in their home turf Wednesday with a mailer accusing him of thwarting ride-sharing legislation in order to help old friends and patrons at a taxi company.

The mailer, called “Connect The Dots,” is being sent to homes in Gardiner’s home district in Orlando. It follows a TV spot Uber launched this week in Orlando and Tallahassee.

Both ads make the same case, that Gardiner has a cozy relationship with owners of Orlando-based Mears Transportation and is following its demand that Uber be stopped.

The mailer shows Gardiner and Mears President Paul Mears III in friendly poses, calling them “lifelong friends.” It lifts a quote from the Orlando Sentinel from Paul Mears Jr. calling Uber “an existential threat to the legacy taxi industry, and from the Miami Herald, noting that Mears Transportation has donated more than $150,000 to Gardiner and the Republican Party of Florida.

Then it notes that Gardiner won’t let the Senate vote on a ride-sharing enabling bill.

It ends with, “It’s easy to connect the dots. Don’t let the taxi industry put the brakes on Uber. Call Senator Andy Gardiner today.

Uber is unhappy with Gardiner, who they say has failed to bring up to a vote in the Senate a companion bill to a bill, passed overwhelmingly in the House, that was sponsored by Fort Walton Republican Matt Gaetz.

Gardiner responds that there isn’t a companion bill in the Senate, because the bill sponsored by Altamonte Springs Republican David Simmons does not address the issue of preemption. That provision would require that local government could not regulate companies like Uber and Lyft.

Mears Transportation controls most of the tax industry in Orlando, as well as much of the contract and charter bus service.

Mitch Perry Report for 3.9.16 – Sanders stuns in Midwest

Although Bernie Sanders and his supporters have to be feeling great after the Vermont senator stunned everyone Tuesday night by defeating Hillary Clinton in Michigan, Clinton’s victory in the richer delegate state of Mississippi won her more delegates for the night, 86-69.

Nevertheless, it’s certainly a stunning rebuke to the pollsters and pundits, some predicting Clinton could win by nearly 30 percentage points. On the Bloomberg Channel’s “With All Due Respect” Tuesday night, the dean of conventional wisdom, Mark Halperin, said the only way that the Sanders could “spin” that they did OK was if he came within 4 percentage points.

He won by 50%-48%.

How big a victory was it? No less than FiveThirtyEight website calls it one of the “one of the greatest upsets in modern political history.”

When Jesse Jackson won Michigan back in 1988, his fans actually thought he might take the nomination, freaking out the DNC leadership.

They ended up nominating Michael Dukakis.

So now what? There are two  huge prizes next week, Ohio and Florida, and again the polling shows Sanders trailing big-time in those states.

I like his chances to surprise better in the Buckeye State than down in Florida, where the reputation as “Clinton Country”seems to be well deserved, until otherwise noted.

Sanders has been so busy trying to win the earlier states that Wednesday will be his first campaign stump this year in Florida, and who knows whether he’d show up if there wasn’t a debate in Miami?

Nevertheless, he does have a very vocal group of supporters in the Sunshine State who are very much into his message, as I can attest covering a couple of events the campaign has had with campaign staff members (as well as the listeners on my weekly radio show).

Although Clinton fans are undoubtedly still feeling smug about her chances of capturing the nomination, perhaps they shouldn’t feel so terrific. The fact is, the majority of states she’s winning in the South are destined to go Red in November. So Sanders’ success with whites in particular could prove troublesome in some of the states where Donald Trump thinks he can compete that other Republicans haven’t in recent elections, such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and perhaps a few others.

In other news …

House District 59  hopeful Rene Frazier says she knows it’s a a lot about negotiating with the other party to get things done as a Democrat in Tallahassee.

• • •

A Survey USA poll done for Bay News 9 is making Florida look ominous for Marco Rubio next week.

• • •

Orlando area U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson says the U.S. Deptartment of Justice won’t look into the circumstances regarding the death of 14-year-old Andrew Joseph III at the Florida State Fairgrounds two years ago. However, he says they may look at the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office’s practices.

• • •

Speaking of the HCSO, it had a message for the media Tuesday regarding the apparent exuberance among some reporters to find out when the Go Hillsborough investigation is due out.

• • •

And Uber is now going after Senate President Andy Gardiner regarding the holdup in voting for a bill regulating TNCs in Tallahassee.

Uber targets Senate President Andy Gardiner in new ad

With just days to go before Sine Die in the Florida Legislature, frustrations are boiling over the issue of whether there will finally be bill regulating TNCs (Transportation Network Companies) in Tallahassee.

Uber is unhappy with Senate President Andy Gardiner, who they say has failed to bring up to a vote in the Senate a companion bill to a bill, passed overwhelmingly in the House, that was sponsored by Fort Walton Republican Matt Gaetz.

Gardiner responds that there isn’t a companion bill in the Senate, because the bill sponsored by Altamonte Springs Republican Dave Simmons does not address the issue of preemption. That provision would require that local government could not regulate companies like Uber and Lyft.

Uber is taking it to another level now, airing this ad in Tallahassee and Orlando.

Here’s the ad:

Senate President Andy Gardiner still considering whether to bring up John Armstrong’s confirmation

Don’t count out Surgeon General John Armstrong quite yet.

Senate President Andy Gardiner said he is still debating whether the Senate will consider Armstrong’s confirmation. Gardiner said if the Senate were to take up Armstrong’s confirmation, it could come up on Thursday.

But, Gardiner said, that’s still a big if.

“I’m not sure we’re there yet,” said Gardiner. “We are not whipping. For me, it’s more of a procedural (question). If we bring him up, what’s the sense of the Senate.”

The Senate Ethics and Elections committee did not take up Armstrong’s confirmation. The committee postponed the hearing several times. Naples Republican Sen. Garrett Richter, the committee’s chairman, said at the time that Armstrong’s confirmation was postponed because members still had questions.

Armstrong’s confirmation has been an uphill battle. His leadership has been criticized, and lawmakers have questioned the state’s growing rate of HIV/AIDs and the slow implementation of the state’s medical marijuana law.

The Senate did not confirm Armstrong during the 2015 legislative session. If it fails to confirm Armstrong this year, the state’s top doctor will be out of a job.

Florida Senate confirms Cissy Proctor, Tom Delacenserie

The heads of two more state agencies are keeping their jobs.

The Florida Senate on Tuesday confirmed dozens of Gov. Rick Scott appointees, including Cissy Proctor, the executive director Department of Economic Opportunities, and Lottery Secretary Tom Delacenserie.

Proctor’s confirmation flew through all of its committee stops.

Scott selected Proctor to lead the agency last year. She replaced Jesse Panuccio. Panuccio was not confirmed by the Senate in 2015. It was widely expected he wouldn’t survive a confirmation hearing in 2016.

“Cissy and Tom are outstanding public servants, people, executive leaders and advocates for all Floridians. They truly understand what it means to serve taxpayers very well,” said Florida TaxWatch President and CEO Dominic M. Calabro. “Florida TaxWatch looks forward to working with both of them in ensuring that Florida remains the best place to learn, to work and to live.”

Lawmakers did not consider Surgeon General John Armstrong, whose confirmation stalled in the Senate Ethics and Elections committee. The panel postponed a vote Armstrong several times. Senate President Andy Gardiner said Monday he is still considering whether to bring Armstrong’s confirmation up before the whole Senate.

Senate pays tribute to outgoing President Andy Gardiner

The man of the hour smiled as his colleagues told stories and reminisced about his time in the Florida Legislature.

They spoke of his commitment to his family, his dedication to his community, and his calm demeanor when dealing with the tough issues the state has faced in recent years.

“He is the George Bailey from ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ in our state,” Fernandina Beach Republican Sen. Aaron Bean said of Senate President Andy Gardiner. “He’s truly the richest man in the Florida Senate.”

Andy Gardiner's official Senate portrait. Courtesy of Florida Senate.
Andy Gardiner’s official Senate portrait. Photo courtesy of the Florida Senate.

For nearly two hours Monday, lawmakers paid tribute to Gardiner, who’s wrapping up his term as Senate President. The  Senate unveiled the official portrait of the 47-year-old Orlando Republican, and colleagues from both sides of the aisle praised him for his nearly two decades in office.

“There has not been a time where I’ve shown up to this office that I don’t look forward to being here,” Gardiner said. “It is an incredible opportunity.”

First elected to the Florida House in 2000, Gardiner served as the House Republican leader from 2004 until 2006. He was elected to the Senate in 2008, where he was the Majority Whip for two years, before becoming the Majority Leader in 2010. He has spent the past two years as the Senate President.

Gardiner – whose son, Andrew, has Down syndrome – has made improving the quality of life for people with unique abilities a priority during his time in office. Gardiner spent much of the past two years pushing legislation to create a path to economic independence for people with unique abilities.

This year the Legislature approved a bill (HB 7003) that expanded the personal learning scholarship account, now known as the Gardiner Scholarship Program, to more students; creates employment options for people with unique abilities, and creates a financial-literacy program for individuals with disabilities. Gov. Rick Scott has already signed the bill into law.

“The greatest accomplishment is bringing folks and families out of the shadows, making it known and expected that we will give them the best opportunities,” said Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, a Fort Myers Republican. “If we did nothing else, we changed the culture.”

Gardiner’s wife, Camille, and three children — 12-year-old Andrew, 8-year-old Joanna Lynn and 5-year-old Kathryn Lucille — attended the ceremony Monday. His parents, in-laws and several friends and former legislators — including former House Speaker Dean Cannon and former Senate President and CFO Jeff Atwater — also attended the event. House Speaker Steve Crisafulli and House Speaker Designate Richard Corcoran were also on hand.

“Thank you for embracing the Gardiner family on this journey,” he said.

Gardiner used his speech to thank his staff, family and friends for their support during his time in the Legislature. He became emotional as he spoke to his colleagues, encouraging them to continue to advocate for their communities.

“There is no doubt in my mind that God has a plan for each and every one of us,” he said.

Uber Florida uses app to call out Andy Gardiner on ride-sharing legislation delay

Uber has had a tough time getting legislation passed this session, and the ridesharing company is focusing its efforts on changing one lawmaker’s mind: Republican Senate President Andy Gardiner.

Starting Monday, Florida users of the ridesharing app will be prompted to “vote for Uber” the next time they call for a car. The “VOTE” app experience redirects users to a page asking them to “tell Senator Gardiner to stop holding up access to safe, affordable, reliable rides.”

“It’s not hard to hold an up or down vote,” the web page reads. “There are only five days left in the 2016 session for the state Senate to vote on allowing all Floridians access to Uber. A bill that would do just that passed the House 108-10, but Senate President Gardiner is refusing to even let the Senate take a vote.”

Customers aren’t the only one Uber hopes to get involved in the fight. The group also announced it made a radio ad buy and direct mail campaign in Gardiner’s Orlando-based district.

“The taxi companies and their well-connected friends are at it again,” the radio ad says over ominous piano music. “But this time, they are not alone. They have turned to their pal, State Senate President Andy Gardiner for help.”

The mail campaign hits a similar note, describing the Senate President as “selling us out to his rich taxi friends,” and urging Floridians to bombard the Orlando Republican’s Tallahassee phone line with pleas to pass the House’s ridesharing bill.

That bill, HB 509 by Shalimar Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz, would pre-empt local regulations on ridesharing companies. It cleared its committee stops and a floor vote in the House with little opposition, but no Senator filed a companion version in the early days of Session, and HB 509 is currently languishing in the Senate.

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