Bernie Sanders Archives - Page 5 of 64 - Florida Politics

Mitch Perry Report for 11.20.16 — Bill de Blasio’s big moment?

In New York City today, Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to give a “major speech” on the presidential election’s impact on the city. De Blasio wants help from the feds to pay for the additional security costs in dealing with the fact that the president-elect’s home is literally in the heart of Midtown Manhattan.

The NYPD has already put about an additional 50 officers on each shift during daytime hours to manage the flow of traffic in the immediate area of Trump Tower, de Blasio said Friday, and he wants Washington to help pay for overtime costs.

Although being mayor of New York already presents a huge national platform, de Blasio’s profile could grow larger as a dominant liberal voice in opposition to the new Donald Trump administration, along with the usual suspects (Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, etc.)

“The mayor has an enormous opportunity to stand up on behalf of New Yorkers and our values. Lots of New Yorkers are afraid of Trump and the mayor can be their voice,” political consultant Howard Wolfson, who advised Michael Bloomberg and served on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 campaign team, told the NY Post on Sunday.

It also may help him as he begins his quest to be re-elected in 2017.

If you’ve followed de Blasio’s tenure to date so far, you know it’s been somewhat checkered, to say the least, following 12 years under Bloomberg. Scorned by conservatives, he hasn’t exactly fired up his own liberal base, and his poll numbers have been pretty average throughout his first three years.

A Quinnipiac poll released last week shows the populace split in half as he received a 47/47 percent approval rating. However, that was his BEST rating since January and up from a negative 42/51 percent approval rating in August.

However, that same poll shows that by a  49-39 percent margin, NYC voters say they don’t support his re-election. To date, no major players have surfaced to challenge the mayor, but there’s still nearly a year for a serious opponent to surface.

Another big mayoral election will take place a year from now in St. Petersburg, where Rick Kriseman’s poll numbers have been solid, though he could be vulnerable if a strong challenger emerges.

In other news …

Local reporters/pundits discussed the 2016 presidential election at the Tampa Tiger Bay Club on Friday.

Donald Trump has been busy nominating men for his Cabinet, including Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions for attorney general. Bill Nelson says he’s withholding judgement on his Senate colleague.

Eckerd College president Donald Eastman is one of 110 college presidents to pen a letter to president-elect Trump on the need to speak out against violence being committed in his name.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Lois Frankel call on Donald Trump to withdraw appointment of Steve Bannon

Calling the appointment over the weekend of former Breitbart news executive Steve Bannon to serve as White House senior counselor “an incendiary decision,” South Florida Democratic Reps. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Lois Frankel are calling on president-elect Trump to withdraw the selection.

“President-elect Donald Trump’s appointment of Steve Bannon as White House senior counselor is an incendiary decision that shows the president-elect is not committed to healing our nation after a hard-fought and divisive election,” the two legislators said in a statement issued late Wednesday.

In the week since his stunning victory over Hillary Clinton for president, no single action by Trump has caused as much uproar from Democrats, the media, and even some Republicans as has been the selection of Bannon to move into the White House after Trump is inaugurated in January.

Bannon’s defenders say he is getting a bad rap: that he is a former Goldman Sachs banker who holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and has produced several documentaries.

Critics highlight his role at Breitbart, which he called “the platform for the alt-right” in July, referring to the online movement that sometimes traffics in racism and anti-Semitism.

In August, Trump hired Bannon to be the CEO of his campaign on the same day he chose Kellyanne Conway to be his new campaign manager.

Other high-profile legislators also are calling on Trump to withdraw the selection of Bannon, such as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who called him “a racist individual.”

“We do not simply disagree with Bannon’s legislative or political agenda and philosophy; we have grave misgivings about his professional career history, in which he provided a megaphone for intolerance and hatred of the diversity that makes our nation truly great,” write Wasserman Schultz and Frankel.

“Bannon’s allies include the American Nazi Party, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, and a variety of other white nationalist groups. As Jewish-American leaders and policymakers, we cannot stand silently by while Steve Bannon assumes a senior position at the highest level of our government. We call on president-elect Trump, in the interest of all Americans, to withdraw his choice because rewarding anti-Semitism, bigotry, and misogyny with such a position of power and influence is tantamount to embracing it.”

 

At second day of Republican Governors Conference, innovation and free-market are the key words

At the second day of the Republican Governors Association Annual Conference in Orlando, a slew of governors from across the nation talked in detail about the policies that led their states to prosperity — among them free market entrepreneurship, education in practical fields, innovation, and more.

The panel included Gov. Susana Martinez of New Mexico, Gov. Doug Ducey of Arizona, Gov. Nathan Deal of Georgia, Gov. Bill Haslam of Tennessee, Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas, and Gov. Gary Herbert of Utah.

According to them, their states all are doing very well because of less regulation and less burdensome rules from the federal government — both of which they hoped would happen even more under a Donald Trump administration.

Ducey, who served as CEO of Cold Stone Creamery before becoming governor, said they had expanded it to multiple other states and even other countries — and that couldn’t have been done with government overreach that “criminalized risk-taking,” as he put it.

Martinez said as a prosecutor, she based her decisions off reason, science, and evidence — and, then, if regulations were only hurting businesses, why have them?

“What do you get from it?” she asked. “If it makes things more expensive, and is harder to apply for — get rid of it. We’ve done that. We’ve been very successful in getting rid of a lot of them.”

Deal talked about Georgia’s booming infrastructure and prosperous airport, and Abbott said Texas was fast-becoming a hub for naked technological innovation. Innovation was touched on by many of the speakers, usually in the context of “releasing the power” of American entrepreneurs, unleashing them from the proverbial shackles of government regulation.

They also talked about the “clouds on the horizon” America still faces, even with a Trump administration they hope can fix all their woes of the past eight years. Those clouds included kids who had embraced Bernie Sanders‘ ideology of Democratic socialism and drugs.

“What we saw with Bernie Sanders, with some of our young people feeling the Bern,” said Herbert. “They reject capitalism, and embraced a self-proclaimed socialist. We need to educate our young people, put a section in our schools that talks about free market capitalism, and how it’s the best service to the most people at the lowest prices. I’m very concerned about our young people. They need to know economics.”

“The amount of citizens addicted to drugs, abusing drugs, is very troubling,” Ducey said. “They’ve made themselves unemployable. I got involved with politics because I wanted to give people a better opportunity, a better chance. But with drug legalization, and the number of people addicted, checked out, it’s unprecedented. Governors need to understand what you need in terms of education and industriousness. I know people see it as a social issue; I see it as an economic issue.”

He said leaders have a responsibility to push for better education so young people and their parents can make the right choices.

Bob Buckhorn says it’s a time for soul searching in the Democratic Party

Lifelong Democrat Bob Buckhorn admits it’s been rough adapting to a world where Hillary Clinton won’t be the next president. The Tampa mayor went all-out for the party’s presidential nominee, including a weekend winter trip to New Hampshire just days before the first primary in the nation last February. And while Clinton did take Hillsborough County (along with the other major metropolitan areas of Florida), she lost the exurban and rural areas big time in ultimately losing to Donald Trump by just 1.2 percent in the Sunshine State last week.

Both the national and state Democratic party are in crisis, with the Democratic National Committee and Florida Democratic Party to decide on new leadership in the coming months. Like so many other Florida Democrats, Buckhorn has been here before.

“Obviously anytime you have a loss like this, there’s going to be a lot of teeth gnashing and soul searching,” the mayor said Tuesday.

“There will be a debate at the national level as to whether or not you move to a more progressive agenda, with people like Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders; or do you try to come back to the center a la Bill Clinton in 1991 and 1992 to drive a message that the middle class mattered, that those rural white working class folks that he could talk to so well have got to be included in the discussion, that it’s not just driving up minority participation but have a message that resonates with everybody.”

Although he didn’t tip his hand as to where he comes down to the different approaches that will no doubt be debated by Democrats going into the holiday season, the mayor historically has come down on the centrist side, and has previously argued that is the only way to win statewide in Florida.

Buckhorn says the conversation needs to begins now among party members in Florida if they’re going to successfully defend Bill Nelson’s Senate seat (Rick Scott admitted on Wednesday what everyone has assumed is a given — he’s looking at running for Nelson’s seat). There’s also the potential to pick up a cabinet seat (or more) with with all four state office positions — governor, attorney general, chief financial officer, and agriculture commissioner — all open seats in 2018. “We need a message that resonates, not just in the cities, but everywhere in the state of Florida,” he said.

Inevitably, any conversation with Buckhorn about politics leads to his own potential participation for one of those seats in 2018 — specifically governor.

Although one-term Congresswoman Gwen Graham has virtually declared her candidacy and there’s a movement afoot to draft Orlando attorney and Democratic fundraiser John Morgan, Buckhorn isn’t showing his cards just yet, but admits he’ll need to decide by early 2017.

“Like a lot of people who are contemplating the future, you have to sort of sift through the carnage of last Tuesday and see what the landscape is, see whether or not there’s a path for victory for Democrats there, whether I’m the guy that can carry that torch, that I can inspire people to follow my lead,” he said, adding, “ultimately it’s gotta come down to whether in my gut whether this is something that I want to do.

“I’m lucky that I’ve got a job that I love coming to work everyday, and if I choose not to do this, I’m going to be perfectly happy, because I get to finish out an opportunity here as mayor that I have worked for my entire life. It’s a good position for me to be in. I do think the state needs new leadership, I think we need a regime change in Tallahassee. And I think that the Tampa renaissance is going to be a pretty compelling story to tell.”

Mitch Perry Report for 11.8.16 — Getting the results before the polls close

The last presidential contest I really didn’t pay that much attention to was back in 1980, but I do remember this: I was in high school, and I had the TV on but the sound down when Jimmy Carter came out at around 6:15 PST to announce he was conceding the election. It was pretty early in the evening, but it was obvious Carter wasn’t going to catch up to Ronald Reagan that night.

Although Carter wanted to get the misery over with, his early concession speech angered people in California on the West Coast, where there were still hours before the polls closed. Every election since then (except for those that went into overtime), have not been declared by the networks and the Associated Press until 11 p.m. Eastern, when all the polls are closed.

That is supposed to change tonight.

As reported by POLITICO on Monday, “Slate and Vice News have partnered with Votecastr, a company helmed by Obama and Bush campaign veterans, to provide real-time projections of how the candidates are faring in each state throughout the day. They expect to begin posting projections at 8 a.m. Eastern time on Election Day — a dramatic departure from current practice, where representatives from a consortium of news organizations (The Associated Press, ABC News, CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and NBC News) huddle in a quarantine room without cell phones, poring over the earliest exit poll data but declining to release anything that points to an election result until all the polls have closed.”

POLITICO also will be working with Morning Consult to conduct a survey of voters after they have cast ballots. Voters will complete the interviews over the internet, beginning one hour after the polls open in their state. Respondents will be asked whether they have voted, and how they voted: either using early voting, by mail or on Election Day in person. POLITICO and Morning Consult will report on some of the results during the day.

I don’t know what any of this means, but let’s face it: in recent elections, people sit around most of the day on Election Day, with nothing to do with polls being meaningless (“the only poll that matters is on Election Day”) but no returns to review until the early evening.

There is some of that infamous exit poll research the networks will start reporting on after 5 p.m. but we all learned after 2004 not to take them too seriously, right, President Kerry?

Personally, I’ll be interested in some House races in Hillsborough County which could go either way — in House Districts 59, 60, and 63.

Have a great day.

In other news …

HART CFO Jeff Seward is going to the International Climate Change Conference in the U.K. next spring, the first representative from a North American transit agency to be invited to the annual event.

On the eve of a Hillsborough County Public Transportation Commission meeting on a temporary agreement with Uber and Lyft, a limousine company based in Tampa says they want to become a ridesharing company as well, and is going to court to challenge the agency.

Marco Rubio made a last-day campaign appearance in Brandon yesterday, where he said he thinks the increase in Latino voters in the early vote bodes well for his chances tonight.

Eric Seidel is thinking he can peel off some wayward Democrats in his bid to defeat Pat Frank in the Hillsborough County Clerk of the Courts race tonight.

In a Vice News interview last night, Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the Bernie Sanders campaign made her into a “bogeyman” for her role at the DNC.

 

In Vice interview, Debbie Wasserman Schultz says Bernie Sanders camp “made me the bogeyman”

Debbie Wasserman Schultz has kept a relatively low profile since her dramatic departure as Chair of the Democratic National Committee, but she comes out swinging when discussing Bernie Sanders in an interview to be broadcast Monday night.

“The Sanders campaign began aggressively trying to find a way to, you know, find a scapegoat and turn the attention away from mistakes that they made. And they they did so successfully and made me the boogywoman. But that’s okay,” Wasserman Schultz says in a short segment of her interview with Vice News scheduled to be aired Monday night on HBO (as well as HBO Go and Now).

Wasserman Schultz is expected to easily win re-election Tuesday night against Republican Joe Kauffman in Florida’s heavily Democratic-centric 23rd Congressional District.  Her major challenge this year was to get through the first contested primary since being elected to Congress, where she ousted law professor Tim Canova by more than 13 percentage points, 57 percent to 43 percent.

Wasserman Schultz abruptly resigned as chair of the DNC on the eve of their national convention this past July in Philadelphia, after leaked DNC mails appeared to show that the committee was favoring Hillary Clinton over Sanders during the primary election. She had still intended to gavel the convention into session when she was jeered at the Florida delegation breakfast on the first day of the convention.

See clip below:

 

 

Donald Trump talks up his support from blacks and Latinos in Tampa speech

Looking over the thousands of adoring fans who had waited for hours to see him speak, Donald Trump kicked off his 50-minute speech at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa on Saturday morning by comparing his audience to Hillary Clinton’s campaign appearance with two of the biggest celebrities in America on Friday night in Cleveland.

“We don’t need Jay Z to fill up arenas,” he said as the crowd cheered. “I actually like Jay-Z but you know, the language last night? Ohhhh. Ohhhhh.”

According to press reports, the famed New York City rapper repeatedly used the n-word and dropped the f-bomb as he performed “F—WithMeYouKnowIGotIt” and his hit “Dirt off Your Shoulder” song at the Cleveland rally – which also featured his wife, Beyonce.

“I like them both,” Trump said of the celebrity couple. “But he used language last night that was so bad, and then Hillary said, ‘I did not like Donald Trump’s lewd language.’ I’ll tell you what, I’ve never said what he said in my life. But that shows you the phoniness of politicians and the phoniness of the whole system, folks.”

That dismissal of the system, or what Trump and his fans call “draining the swamp,” is something what his supporters say they love about him as the end of the 2016 campaign grows near.

“I’m not that political. But seeing what was going on with Hillary, all that WikiLeaks stuff that’s coming out, all the corruption that she’s been doing. You have to get involved,” said Altamonte Springs resident Orisis Register. “It comes to a point where you have to say’ enough is enough.’ And you have to start getting involved.”

Trump’s 10:00 a.m. scheduled speech in Tampa (he actually hit the stage at 10:20 a.m) was the first of four scheduled appearances for the day, with later events scheduled in Wilmington, North Carolina, Reno and a 9:30 p.m. local time appearance in Denver, nearly 12 hours after he began his day.

Hillary Clinton, conversely, had only one scheduled appearance on Saturday, in South Florida. That skimpy schedule was duly noted by Trump. “I’m doing five or six of these a day, and Hillary goes home, she goes to sleep,” he said. “She doesn’t have the energy to do it, believe me.”

What Clinton does have that Trump doesn’t however, are star surrogates, like Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and on occasion, first lady Michelle Obama, in addition to running mate Tim Kaine, who was also in the Tampa Bay area on Saturday, appearing in Sarasota in the afternoon and with rocker Jon Bon Jovi in a get-out-the vote effort at the State Theater in St. Petersburg.

Regarding policy issues, Trump pushed hard in his address on the recently announced increase in premiums for a certain percentage of people getting their health care insurance from the Affordable Care Act.

He also criticized Clinton’s support of trade deals like NAFTA, the WTO and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (which she no longer supports) as something that he’ll reverse when elected, and listed companies that have suffered job losses in the past year, saying that Florida has lost one in four manufacturing jobs since NAFTA was signed in 1994.

Although there is just hours left before Election Day, 30 million Americans have already voted as of Saturday morning, more than five million of them in Florida. There have reports in a large increase in Latino voters, a trend that could portend bad things for Trump, considering that the group Latino Decisions said on Friday that they estimate that 79 percent will vote for Clinton, and only 18 percent for Trump.

“Hispanics for Trump, “Women for Trump,” and “Blacks for Trump” signs were distributed to those entering the arena to hear Trump on Saturday, prompting him to talk up his support for the black and brown community.

“That’s turning out to be story of this election: the African-American vote,” he said, though the story of that demographic to date in terms of the mainstream media coverage is how their voting numbers are down in the post Obama-era.

“How many Hispanics do we have here?” Trump then asked. “That’s another story that’s turning out to be very big. The Hispanic vote is turning out to be much different than people thought,” he said somewhat ambiguously.

Trump went on to familiar tropes, including his criticism of Clinton’s support for wanting to bring more Syrian refugees into the country.  “Her plan will import generations of terrorism, extremism and radicalism into your schools and throughout your communities. When I’m elected your president, we will suspend immediately the Syrian refugee program,” he said to cheers, adding, “And we will keep radical Islamic terrorists the hell out of our country.”

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi kicked off the morning’s activities as the M.C.. A number of other speakers followed, including 80’s Saturday Night Live cast member Joe Piscopo, former Notre Dame head coach Lou Holtz and Polk County area Representative Dennis Ross, who’s expected to win another two-year term in Congress on Tuesday.

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“I did not get elected to surrender this White House to a crook!” said an overly excited Ross, who said the nation’s Second Amendment rights “would be taken away from us” with a Clinton victory on Tuesday.

T-shirts such as “Trump that bitch” and “We’re going to need a bigger basket” could be prominently seen in the audience.

Longtime Miami Beach political activist Bob Kunst stood in the fairgrounds parking lot with “Trump vs. Tramp” and “Hillary: Liar – Traitor” signs propped in front of his car as early attendees made their way into the arena. A registered Democrat, Kunst said he broke ranks with Hillary a few years ago when she “got in bed with Obama” when it comes to dividing the city of  Jerusalem. He’s critical of the Iranian nuclear deal, but he also admitted that Trump is a wild card when it comes to how he might implement any of his policies. But he said it was worth voting for him.

“On the other hand, we know where we’re at right now, which is no future, no hope. A disaster. One scandal after another,” he said. “Anybody who could go with this woman is just unbelievable.”

Kunst says he’s been to 38 Trump rallies around the nation. “This is mishmash of people who wouldn’t sit in the same room with each other in normal occasions,” he said. “The country is in trouble. People are concerned, they’re all freaking out. Where are we going with this thing? It seems to be collapsing before our very eyes.”

Brockville resident Pat Pimm said he’s been backing Trump since last November. Pimm said the number one issue he believed Trump would address is energy, specifically to maintain oil, natural gas and coal into the mix of energy sources for years go to come.

“You gotta get those folks back to work,” he said of coal workers. “That’s a huge part of our economy. It’s wonderful if we have this green economy, but we’ve got to have the entire works. We can’t put the coalminers out of work for the sake of a little green energy. We need it all. It’s going to take a long time to transition to green stuff.”

When asked if he believed in climate change, Pimm said “The climate’s been changing. The climate will always be changng. But I don’t think it’s changed anymore because of industrialization.”

Although Trump is going out west for part of this weekend’s campaign activities, he’ll be right back in the Tampa Bay area on Monday, with a just announced event taking place at Robarts Arena in Sarasota at 11 a.m.

Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump use whatever they’ve got in the final push

Knock on every door. Marshal every volunteer. Lob every attack.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are opening the final weekend of a marathon campaign by pulling out every tool they have to get their supporters to vote. Polls show critical battleground states may still be up for grabs ahead of Tuesday’s election.

Clinton and her allies rushed to shore up support among African-Americans, acknowledging signs of weaker-than-expected turnout in early vote data. That has raised a red flag about diminished enthusiasm that could spell trouble for Democrats up and down the ballot.

The Democrat was due to campaign in Pennsylvania and Michigan on Friday, states long considered Democratic strongholds. She’s been pounding Trump for his record on race, accusing him of tacitly encouraging support from white supremacists.

“He has spent this entire campaign offering a dog whistle to his most hateful supporters,” Clinton said at a rally in Greenville, North Carolina.

The Democrat got a boost Friday in the Labor Department’s monthly jobs report which showed the unemployment rate declined to 4.9 percent while wages went up in October. It’s the sort of news that might nudge voters to continue current economic policies, as Clinton has promised.

But this campaign has rarely seemed to hinge on policy. The big personalities on both sides have overshadowed more nuanced questions. Heading into the final days, both campaigns are presenting the choice as a crossroads for democracy.

For Trump, that means zeroing in on questions about Clinton’s trustworthiness and a new FBI review of an aide’s emails. Trump warned Thursday that never-ending investigations would prevent his Democratic opponent from governing effectively, speaking directly to voters who may be reluctant Trump supporter but are also repelled by the possible return to Washington of Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

“Here we go again with the Clintons – you remember the impeachment and the problems,” Trump said Thursday at a rally in Jacksonville, Florida. “That’s not what we need in our country, folks. We need someone who is ready to go to work.”

In spite of a close race in national polling, Trump’s path to victory remained narrow. He must win Florida to win the White House, which polls show remains a neck-and-neck race. Early voting has surged in the state. The number of early voters so far, 5.26 million, has already exceeded the overall early voting figure for 2012, and voting will continue this weekend. Republicans have a very narrow edge in ballots cast.

North Carolina also has emerged as critical state for Trump – in part because of early signs that African-American turnout there is lagging.

Both campaigns are so focused on the two states, the candidate and allies have been nearly running into each other at airports. Trump tweeted about gazing at Air Force One at the Miami airport Thursday, using the moment to rip President Barack Obama for campaigning instead of governing.

Both candidates are leaning on surrogates to help carry their message. While Clinton rallies voters in Pittsburgh and Detroit, Obama was to campaign Friday in North Carolina. Bill Clinton was headed to Colorado and Vice President Joe Biden was due in Wisconsin, both states Clinton was believed to have locked up weeks ago. Clinton planned to end her day at a get-out-the-vote rally in Cleveland, using hip-hop artist Jay-Z to draw young people to her cause.

On Thursday, she campaigned with former primary opponent Sen. Bernie Sanders and pop star Pharrell Williams.

Trump was set to headline events Friday in New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Ohio, while running mate Mike Pence is visiting Michigan, North Carolina and Florida.

While Trump’s children, Eric and Ivanka Trump, hit the trail Thursday, his wife, Melania, made her first speech in months. She vowed to advocate against cyberbullying if she becomes first lady, although she made no reference to her husband’s frequent use of Twitter to call his opponents “liars” and “crooked.”

Republished with permission of the Associated Press.

Donald Trump delivers the usual to half-empty hall in Jacksonville

Enthusiasm gap for Donald Trump?

With President Barack Obama across town at the University of North Florida, the GOP presidential nominee couldn’t fill the 6,500-person capacity Jacksonville Equestrian Center.

“Great crowd, thank you very much,” Trump said to kick off the event, before discussing poll numbers favorable for him, then launching into his usual critiques of the corrupt Clinton machine.

“We’re leading all over,” Trump said, before sharing “breaking news” regarding “an FBI investigation” into “Hillary Clinton pay-for-play … putting the office of secretary of state up for auction.”

Trump asserted “the investigation is likely to lead to an indictment,” causing the “lock her up” chants to echo throughout the room, creating an ethereal droning noise toward the empty space in the back.

“She shouldn’t be allowed to run for the office of president, and that is where the system is rigged,” Trump said.

Much of Trump’s speech was the greatest hits tour. Well-worn routines about Clinton hammering phones to destroy them only deviated when he asked the crowd if any of them had destroyed phones.

One hand went up.

“I don’t want to know what business you’re in,” Trump quipped.

Trump called a Clinton presidency a “constitutional crisis.”

“This isn’t what we need … we need somebody who’s going to go to work,” Trump said. “This is going to be a mess for many years to come.”

Trump noted he saw Air Force One in Miami; upon mentioning President Barack Obama, the boos echoed off the empty back wall of the rodeo space.

“Why isn’t he back working? He’s campaigning every day. She’s under criminal investigation. I think he has a conflict.”

Citing WikiLeaks, Trump speculated that “Obama knew what she was doing.”

The Obamacare riff resurfaced. While it seemed fresh just days before, in the context of this campaign’s accelerated news cycles, it seemed as novel as last summer’s hit single.

“The president kept lying and lying. Premiums are surging, companies are leaving, and deductibles are through the roof,” Trump said, calling Obamacare a “catastrophe” on which “Hillary Clinton wants to double down.”

“It’s bigger than your mortgage; it’s bigger than your rent,” Trump continued.

Donna Brazile? Yes, there was a riff on her also.

“She took the questions and gave them to Crooked Hillary,” Trump said, before pivoting to poor Bernie Sanders.

“At some point,” Trump said, “doesn’t he tell her supporters to vote for Trump?”

As well, said Trump, “we are living through the biggest jobs theft in the history of the world … from now on, it’s going to be America First.”

NAFTA is on thin ice. So is currency manipulation. And the “job-killing Trans Pacific Partnership.” And “billions in global warming payments to the United Nations” will be canceled.

Continuing the Buchanan-ite America First theme, Trump spent some time discussing wars overseas as part of the Clinton legacy, saying we defend the borders of countries far away while keeping ours open.

As well, Trump botched his policy play to the locals, vowing support for “Jack Port.” [Note to outsiders and Trump operatives: it’s JAXPORT].

“We are led by stupid people,” said Trump. “Remember that.”

Later in the speech, he did manage to get the name of Mayport right, when talking about the 350-ship Navy he wanted to create.

Perhaps because of the heat in the half-empty room on an 80-degree day, Trump’s critiques of the media were muted, limited to saying the press was protecting Clinton, yet “the protected one is not well-protected.”

“When we win on Nov. 8,” Trump vowed, “we are going to Washington D.C. and we are going to drain the swamp!”

As has been customary with Jacksonville events for Trump, the crowd began to trickle out about 40 minutes into his remarks.

img_8390Perhaps to beat the crowd. What there was of it.

Mitch Perry Report for 11.2.16 — Hillary Clinton returns to the oldie but goodies in Dade City speech

Remember when Hillary Clinton would invoke Michelle Obama‘s phrase when dealing with Donald Trump that, “When they go low, we go high?”

That was so, oh, I don’t know, October-like.

In Pasco County yesterday, the Democratic presidential nominee spent considerable time tearing apart Trump, invoking his greatest hits of insults as she tries to rally the base in the final week of the campaign.

Clinton dug deep, referring to how The Donald boasted on Howard Stern’s show about how he used to go backstage at beauty pageants to barge in on the women while they were getting dressed.

“He said he did that — he said he did that to ‘inspect’ them. That was his word — and he said, ‘I sort of get away with things like that.’ And sure enough, contestants have come forward to say, ‘Yes, that’s exactly what he did to us.’ Now, as bad as that is, he didn’t just do it at the Miss USA pageant or the Miss Universe pageant. He’s also been accused of doing it at the Miss Teen USA pageant. Contestants say that Donald Trump came in to look at them when they were changing. Some of them were just 15 years old. We cannot hide from this. We’ve got to be willing to face it. This man wants to be president of the United States of America and our First Lady, Michelle Obama, spoke for many of us when she said Donald Trump’s words have shaken her to her core.”

Obviously, talking about policies has never been at the forefront of this campaign, but undoubtedly this will probably be the nature of her oratory over the next six days. Not exactly the soaring rhetoric her team could have intended to be her message in closing out this interminable campaign.

There are reports this morning that Team Clinton and their allies are freaking out about the black vote not being as robust for Clinton so far in early/absentee voting, in comparison to 2008 and 2012.

Message to the rest of planet Earth — Nobody every thought it could be. Barack Obama‘s name on the ballot was revolutionary in 2008, and though much less so in 2012, it still brought out the black vote in unprecedented ways. Did anybody seriously think Clinton was going to match that number?

Clinton remains strong with older blacks, but millennials have never bought into her to the same extent. A friend of mine yesterday questioned the entire premise that Clinton was so popular among blacks. He said, wasn’t that what “they” said took her over the top over Bernie Sanders?

That wasn’t an opinion; that was a fact. Clinton dominated the black vote — a huge demographic in Democratic primaries — over the Vermont-based socialist senator. I’ve argued that if he had made stronger inroads with the African-American community to any extent prior to his unlikely rise over the past year, he might have had a fighting chance at the nomination.

But Clinton, and certainly Sanders, were never going to get a comparable black vote in 2008 or 2012. Not going to happen.

In other news …

One interesting trend in Florida with less than a week before the voting ends is the record vote from the Latino community to date.

SD 18 Democrat Bob Buesing has gone up on TV with his final ad (he says).

David Jolly isn’t giving up on trying to take part of the black vote in St. Petersburg away from Charlie Crist. The CD 13 Republican is airing a new ad that once again goes back in time to the era when his Democratic opponent was known as “Chain-Gang Charlie.”

Former Florida Sen. and Gov. Bob Graham held a conference call yesterday to detail his problems with Amendment 1, the solar power initiative. Graham said its passage could neutralize the Amendment 4 solar power measure that passed by 73 percent in August. A spokesperson for the measure strongly disagrees with him.

Civil engineer Wael Odeh hopes to win a Temple Terrace City Council seat next week, despite a hate-filled letter spread to households in the city last month regarding his character because he is a Muslim.

Newly leaked WikiLeaks emails indicate that while former DNC head Debbie Wasserman Schultz was all about Hillary Clinton, the feeling among some of her staffers absolutely wasn’t mutual.

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