Florida Archives - Page 3 of 44 - Florida Politics

Survey says Florida has political corruption, but it’s legal

Florida continues to have some issues with political corruption.

That, according to the new survey from the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics Corruption in America.

The report is based on responses from hundreds of journalists covering state politics, along with issues related to corruption across all 50 states. Both legal and illegal corruption is measured, with illegal corruption defined as private gains such as cash or gifts by a government official in exchange for specific benefits.

Legal corruption, meanwhile, is defined as political gains such as campaign contributions or endorsements by an official in exchange for providing specific benefits to individuals or groups.

So how does Florida rank? Respondents claim illegal corruption in the Sunshine State is only “slightly common.”

However, legal corruption in Florida is described as “very common,” in both the executive and legislative branches of government.

As to best and worst states overall, “With respect to illegal corruption, Georgia and West Virginia are perceived to be the most corrupt states, followed by Hawaii, and a third group of states that includes New Jersey, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Oregon is perceived to be the least corrupt state, followed by Vermont, and a third group of states that includes Iowa, Maine, and Wyoming,” say the report’s authors.

Darryl Paulson: It’s time to let more felons vote in Florida

Few things divide voters more than giving criminals the right to vote, even if they are former criminals.

The issue will likely receive additional attention with the decision by Virginia’s Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe to use his executive power to extend voting rights to all 206,000 felons in his state. Even murderers, rapists and other violent felons will have their voting rights restored.

Critics raise several objections. First, they say the governor, acting alone, does not have the authority to institute such a significant change. Second, even if he does have the authority, he erred in granting voting rights to violent felons.

A final objection is that McAuliffe’s action was nothing more than a partisan political act to enroll Democratic voters to help his friend Hillary Clinton carry Virginia in the November presidential election.

Only two states, Maine and Vermont, have no restrictions on felon voting. Even those in prison may vote. Fourteen states reinstate the right to vote once prisoners have served their sentences, while 20 states restore voting rights after felons complete the sentence and probation and parole.

Three states, including Florida, impose a lifetime ban on felon voting unless the person appeals to the governor and cabinet and they agree to reinstate the right to vote.

Six states — Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee and Virginia — exclude over 7 percent of voting-age adults from voting due to a felony conviction.

Florida excludes more people from voting than any other state, banning 10.4 percent of the state’s voting-age population from casting a ballot because of a felony. For Florida’s African American population, 23.3 percent are disqualified. As The Sentencing Project noted in a 2010 report, “more people were disenfranchised in Florida than in any other state.”

All of the six states with the most disenfranchised felons are southern states with large black populations. There is a distinct relationship between race and voter disenfranchisement.

Most of the southern states instituted laws or constitutional amendments, such as the felon vote, after the Civil War to suppress black voting.

In Virginia, it was evident why these policies were instituted. In 1906, Virginia state Sen. Carter Glass explained why the Legislature passed the felon vote and other discriminatory barriers. The reforms will “eliminate the darkey as a political factor in the state in less than five years.” The end result, said Carter, will be the “complete supremacy of the white race in the affairs of government.”

Republicans, who control the Virginia Legislature, contend that the governor’s action was political. Based on many studies, the felons are likely to register as a Democrat over Republican by a margin of six to one.

Studies indicate that the felon vote will have little impact on election results because few felons bother to vote. At most, they might add one-half of 1 percent. In a competitive state like Virginia, however, those few votes could be the difference between victory and defeat.

Republicans, who generally oppose making it easy to restore voting rights to felons, point out that George W. Bush won Florida in 2000 by 537 votes. If felons were completely granted the right to vote, Al Gore would have won Florida and the presidency by 80,000 votes.

In 2007, then Republican Gov. Charlie Crist, with the support of the Cabinet, revised the felon-vote appeal process to make it easier for felons to get their voting rights restored.

Crist said that felons who have their voting rights restored are less likely to return to prison. Also, he argued that only 25 percent of felons go to prison. In other words, most felons have not committed violent acts. From April 2007 until March 2011, 154,178 Floridians had their voting rights restored.

But Gov. Rick Scott reversed the easing in the restoration of voting rights. Over the next two years, only 370 felons had their right to vote restored.

Under current Florida rules, felons must wait seven years after completing their sentences to apply for reinstitution of their voting rights. In addition, the system is so backlogged with appeals that it takes an average of nine years to complete the review.

A felon who leaves a Florida prison in 2016 cannot apply for restoration until 2023. After a nine-year review, it will be 2032 before the governor and cabinet hear the appeal. Any minor infraction, even a parking ticket, could derail the process.

Democrats like McAuliffe can be criticized for pushing for felon vote restoration only months before a national election in which Democrats would gain an advantage.

Republicans like Scott can be criticized for impeding the restoration of voting rights for felons even thought studies show it reduces recidivism.

Unlike McAuliffe, I have no sympathy for restoring voting rights to violent felons. Unlike Scott, I have no problem restoring voting rights to felons who have not committed acts of violence and, many of whom, never spend a day in prison.

Democrats cannot support restoration of felon rights simply because their party will benefit, nor can Republicans oppose restoration because they will suffer political harm.

There is plenty of shame for both parties. Wouldn’t it be novel if both parties jointly supported legislation that restored restoration for non-violent felons who have served their time? Such a program would reduce recidivism, which should be the goal.

OK! Wake me up. I had this weird dream about both parties cooperating to achieve a sound public policy.

***

Darryl Paulson is Emeritus Professor of Government at USF St. Petersburg. Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Jacksonville, Key West being considered as Navy surveillance drone sites

Jacksonville and Key West are two sites being considered by the Navy as possible locations for its new squadron of unmanned aerial surveillance drones.

The three sites the Navy is considering are Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Naval Air Station Key West in the Florida Keys and the NASA Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia.

The announcement comes from U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, who is touting Florida as the best choice.

“Both installations meet the requirements established by the Department of the Navy as current operations at both airfields are compatible with MQ-4C operations, both airfields provide direct access to overwater operating areas without land overflight, and both installations have existing airfield facilities with the capacity and capability to meet the start-up and on-going operation schedule of the MQ-4C,” said Nelson in letter to the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus.

In other words, both Key West and Jacksonville are in close proximity to both the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea and there are ongoing unmanned aircraft operations already being performed at the Florida sites.

The Navy’s MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial vehicle is capable of flying for more than 24 hours at a time and surveying over 2.7 million square miles in a single mission. It’s used to provide sailors and Naval officers with real-time intelligence and surveillance, as well as assist in maritime search and rescue operations.

In addition to eight Triton drones, up to 400 sailors and their families would also be stationed at the Navy’s selected location.

 

 

 

Bob Graham on Gwen Graham: ‘I’m thrilled’ she might run for governor

Former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator Bob Graham says he’s “thrilled” his daughter, U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham, is considering a run for governor, calling her an “outstanding public servant.”

The proud dad noted that his offspring scored very high on Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy ranking of how often each member of Congress works across party lines.

“Gwen was No. 1 in the 27 members from Florida, and number seven overall. That’s the kind of leadership she has provided. And should she be honored with opportunities for service, she’ll do it again,” Graham Senior told Florida Politics.

Gwen Graham, a Democrat of Tallahassee, announced this week she won’t seek re-election to Congress after the state’s redistricting process reconfigured her congressional district to be less favorable to Democrats. She shared in this video release she’s considering a gubernatorial run in 2018.

“The redistricting process was super-broken two years ago, and it’s mildly broken now,” said her father. “I wish we had an independent commission to do this. If that were the case, we wouldn’t have had this fiasco of the legislature spending so much time on it, then finally throwing up their hands.”

As to whether Gwen Graham is seeking the advice of her dad, who has himself occupied the governor’s mansion, about the state’s highest office?

“Gwen is a mature, experienced person. But if she should pick up the phone and ask her father for some thoughts on a particular matter, I’m not going to turn down the governor,” Bob Graham replied smilingly.

“I think with Gwen Graham as governor, we would be on a trajectory that is more visionary and looking to the question of — what kind of Florida do we want to build together? This state is going to double in population in this century. Are we protecting the sensitive areas that protect our water supply? Dealing with transportation challenges? Building an educational system that will give our people the opportunity to have a world-class education and to be competitive in the world economy? These are the kinds of issues that would motivate her campaign.”

 

Steve Schale: The Democratic primary is over, let’s go beat Donald Trump

The Bernie Sanders campaign is over. The commanding win by Hillary Clinton should bring an end to the nomination fight.

Going into Tuesday night, her delegate lead was over 200, and her popular vote lead was over 2.4 million.  We’ll see how the New York delegates get allocated, but her lead will significantly grow and she will add another 200,000 or more her popular vote lead.

This in a state that Sanders’ top adviser has said was one they needed to win, and one where Sanders himself, as recently as last week said: “We will win a major victory here in New York next Tuesday.”

The facts are no longer disputable:

After Tuesday, Sanders will need to win 59 percent of the remaining delegates to get to the nomination.

And if we look ahead to next week, based simply on the public polling available for next Tuesday’s primaries and assuming Clinton gets no bump from Tuesday’s win, after next Tuesday Sanders will need to win roughly 65 percent of the delegates in the remaining 14 contests. Only two, Guam and Puerto Rico, are caucuses.

To put it in clearer terms, after next Tuesday, she will need to win only about 350 of the remaining 1,000 or so delegates. It is over.

In addition, after next Tuesday, she will almost certainly lead the popular vote by more than 3 million votes. There will also be no viable path for him to win a majority of the popular vote.

For those who point to 2008, let’s compare the race at the same point:

If you go back to the week after Pennsylvania, Barack Obama had a less than 100-delegate lead compared to Clinton’s, which will likely be over 300.  And yes, California was earlier last time, but even if you take California out of the 2008 map, she has more than twice the delegate lead that Obama had in 2008.

Or compare the popular vote: fewer than 200,000 votes separated Clinton and Obama at this point in 2008.  This election has not been anything like 2008.

There is no longer any viable path for Sanders to be the Democratic nominee for president, and at this point, his staying in the race simply slows the critical organizing efforts that need to begin in battleground states.

Clinton is going to go to the convention with a much larger lead in both pledged delegates and popular vote than Obama in 2008.

For the Sanders people, I get it. His campaign is a remarkable story and his team and his supporters deserve a lot of credit. It isn’t easy when the presidential dream ends. Trust me, I experienced it on a smaller scale last fall. There are real stages of grief when a campaign ends.

But it is over. First, he isn’t going to win 65 percent of the remaining delegates. Secondly, the Democratic superdelegates (a system I support reforming) aren’t going to overturn both the popular vote and the delegate vote to nominate Sanders. Sanders isn’t going to be the nominee and the sooner that everyone comes to grips with this, the better chance Democrats will collectively have of winning in November.

That’s because the Republicans will circle the wagons around their nominee.  Sure there will be some holdouts, but in the end, their desire to win the White House will overtake their angst about Donald Trump or Ted Cruz.

Secondly, we still live in a divided country: the days of Lyndon Johnson or Ronald Reagan landslides are behind us.  This election will still be decided in seven to nine battleground states, just as it has since the early 90s.

Next, the rhetoric between the Clinton and Sanders campaigns is unnecessarily hostile. As the campaign has gotten more desperate for oxygen, Sanders has increasingly turned the guns of his campaign toward the DNC, other Democrats as well as questioning Clinton’s character. He’s reached the stage where rather than admitting loss, he’s blaming the winner, and absolutely none of this helps Democrats win in November.

Now I get it, campaigns have to do what they have to do to win. But when you are no longer winning, a candidate has to decide whether he or she is going to be a team player or torch the tent — as Trump is doing on the GOP side.

This is the time for Sanders to show how you can win by losing.

And the sooner the better, as Democrats have real work to do.

Let’s just take Florida.  Since 1992, no state has been more competitive, and for Republicans, there is no path to the White House without it.  As dysfunctional as the GOP looks now, they will get their act together.  Don’t believe me? Rick Scott couldn’t win either.

But in some ways, Democrats start out in a tougher spot than eight years ago.  Since 2008, the GOP has cut the Democratic voter registration advantage by almost 380,000 voters.  Democrats’ 5 percent voter registration advantage in 2008 is 2 percent today.  And whether you want to admit it or not, that has translated into Republicans winning races down the ballot.

In addition, while I would argue that many of the voters Democrats have lost were voters they had long ago lost, the Democratic coalition of voters now, while more loyal, are also more infrequent.

Nearly 50 percent is now ethnic minorities, voters who are historically less likely to turn out.

While I have nothing but honest respect for the field generals on the Clinton campaign, the longer the campaign has to organize, the better positioned it will be to turn out Democratic voters at the 2008 and 2012 levels.

I thought it was time for Sanders to end his campaign in March, after he basically ceded Florida.

But I understood why he kept going. Sanders’ campaign has done things, particularly in engaging new grassroots donors, that we may never see again.

But at this point, there is no longer an argument for it continuing.  The primary is over.  There is no path, and there is no math.

So rather than taking a sledgehammer to each other, let’s go beat Trump.

***

Steven Schale is a Florida-based political, communications and government-relations strategist. He can reached at steven.schale@gmail.com Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Corrine Brown is running: ‘I intend to declare my candidacy’

Embattled North Florida Congresswoman Corrine Brown has evidently decided she’s all in for re-election, despite losing her redistricting challenge and dealing with a House ethics investigation.

“I am very disappointed in the Federal court’s decision earlier this week,” said Brown in a statement.

“Although I still maintain that the new congressional districts will be severely disadvantageous to minorities throughout the state of Florida, I intend to declare my candidacy for the newly drawn Congressional District Five of Florida.  With respect to the redistricting lawsuit, I am still mulling my options, and am reviewing the ruling with Rep. John Conyers (the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee), as well as with Attorney William Sheppard and his legal team in Jacksonville,” said Brown.

Brown’s decision to run again for the seat she’s held since 1992 should impact the next moves of other Jacksonville politicians eyeing the newly redrawn CD 5 seat, namely Mia Jones, Audrey Gibson, Tony Hill and former Jacksonville mayor Alvin Brown. All were awaiting her decision before formally entering the race.

Jones tells Florida Politics that Brown’s announcement will take her out of the running for the seat. “I have always said I would consider it if Congresswoman Brown opted not to run again,” said Jones. “Since she is, I will not run.”

Still awaiting statements meanwhile, from Gibson and Hill, although they had indicated a similar inclination with regard to the seat. A spokesman for Alvin Brown was also noncommittal, saying that the former mayor is currently focused on his fellowship at Georgetown University.

As for Corrine Brown: “I have a lot of unfinished business to address in Washington, and I look forward to providing a strong voice in Congress for the citizens in the new 5th Congressional District.”

John Rutherford for CD4? Not so fast, say some Jax Republicans

Jacksonville Republicans of influence are beginning to push back against what they call “the rush to anoint John Rutherford as Ander Crenshaw‘s successor.”

A well-placed mover in moderate North Florida Republican circles tells Florida Politics that the group, consisting of both business and political leaders, is on the hunt for someone else to throw their hat into the ring.

Former Sheriff Rutherford is seen as having the inside track on the seat, with strong poll numbers, and high favorable ratings and name recognition. He has already locked up Mayor Lenny Curry‘s support, along with the financial muscle of several heavy hitters in North Florida who historically have backed winning candidates (or what critics deride as the city’s good ol’ boy network).

However, this email message was recently sent to said Republican influencers around town, raising questions about the process:

As I’ve reflected on what transpired yesterday in the 24 hours following Ander Crenshaw’s retirement announcement, I’ve become more discouraged about the future of our city and the region. As much as I respect the mayor and wish he and his team well, the rush to anoint John Rutherford as Crenshaw’s successor smacked of repayment of a political debt, not necessarily a thoughtful endorsement of the candidate best positioned to boost our city’s clout in Washington.

I have nothing against the sheriff and nothing against any of the candidates whose names were floated yesterday, but none jumped out as someone that possessed the ability to quickly rise in leadership in DC. And that’s what being in Congress is all about. It’s not about the safe candidate to whom everyone owes a political favor. It’s about ensuring we have the clout to protect our military bases, expand them and bring home our share of the tax dollars that we send north. Charlie Bennett was that kind of guy. So was Tillie Fowler. They were both forces of nature and had Tillie not kept her term limit promise, she could very likely have been the Florida’s first Speaker of the House.

I don’t see any of the names floated in today’s paper as capable of filling their shoes. I see well-meaning politicians, but no one with the charisma and political skill to quickly plug into leadership. I don’t know what the answer is. I wish we had a deeper bench of up-and-comers who could go to Washington and make Jacksonville’s voice matter. Instead, we see the norm — the same political players lining up behind the same candidates. I know they mean well, but damn it, isn’t it time for a breath of fresh air?

For local political observers, the question now becomes, who might this group persuade to run that can “make Jacksonville’s voice matter?”

Steve Schale: The Democratic nomination is over

The commanding win tonight by Secretary Hillary Clinton should bring an end to the nomination fight. Going into tonight, her delegate lead was over 200, and her popular vote lead was over 2.4 million. We’ll see how the delegates get allocated, but her lead will significantly grown tonight, and she will add another 200,000 or more her popular vote lead.

This in a state that Bernie Sanders‘ top adviser has said was one they needed to win and one where Sanders himself, as recently as last week, said: “We will win a major victory here in New York next Tuesday.”

The facts on this are no longer disputable:

After tonight, Sanders will need to win 59 percent of the remaining delegates to get to the nomination.

And if we look ahead to next week, based simply on the public polling available for the April 26 primaries & assuming Clinton gets no bump from tonight’s win, after next Tuesday Sanders will need to win roughly 65 percent of the delegates in the remaining 14 contests (of which only two: Guam and Puerto Rico are caucuses).

To put it in clearer terms, after April 26, she will only need to win about 350 of the remaining 1,000 or so delegates to secure a majority of pledged delegates. It is over.

In addition, after April 26, she will almost certainly lead the popular vote by more than 3 million votes.  There will also be no viable path for him to win a majority of the popular vote.

For those who point to 2008, let’s compare the race at the same point:

If you go back to the week after Pennsylvania – Obama had a less than 100 delegate lead in pledged delegates, compared to Clinton’s, which will likely be over 300. And yes, California was earlier last time, but even if you take California out of the 08 map, she has more than twice the delegate lead that Obama had in 08.

Or compare the popular vote: less than 200,000 votes separated Clinton and Obama at this point in 2008.  This election, outside of the media narrative, has not been, nor today is anything like 2008.

There is no longer any viable path for Bernie Sanders to be the Democratic nominee for President, and at this point, his staying in the race simply slows the critical organizing efforts that need to begin in battleground states.

Hillary Clinton is going to go to the convention with a much larger lead in both pledged delegates and popular vote than Barack Obama in 2008. This race isn’t even close at this point, despite Sanders’ recent wins.

For the Sanders people, I get it. His campaign is a remarkable story, and his team and his supporters deserve a lot of credit. It isn’t easy when the presidential dream ends. Trust me; I experienced it on a smaller scale last fall. There are real stages of grief when a campaign ends.

But it is over. First, he isn’t going to win 65 percent of the remaining delegates, which under our math, would require him to win the states after April 26 by margins of roughly 30 percent. Secondly, the Democratic super delegates (a system I support reforming) aren’t going to overturn both the popular vote and the delegate vote to nominate Sanders. Sanders isn’t going to be the nominee and the sooner that everyone comes to grips with this, the better chance we will collectively have of winning in November.

And as I mentioned on my blog in March, here is why:

The Republicans will circle the wagons around their nominee. Sure there will be some holdouts, but in the end, their desire to win the White House will overtake their angst with either Donald Trump or Ted Cruz.

Secondly, we still live in a divided country: the days of Johnson or Reaganesque landslides are behind us. This election will still be decided out in 7-9 battleground states, just as it has since the early 90s.

Next, at this point, the rhetoric between the campaigns is unnecessarily hostile – and I say “unnecessarily” because the race is functionally over. As the campaign has gotten more desperate for oxygen, Sanders has increasingly turned the guns of his campaign toward the DNC, other Democrats as well as questioning Hillary’s character. Basically, he’s reached the stage where rather than admitting loss, he’s blaming the winner, and absolutely none of this helps us win in November.

Now I get it; campaigns have to do what they have to do to win, but when you are no longer winning – particularly in a primary fight, a candidate has to decide whether they are going to be a team player, or torch the tent — as Trump is doing on the GOP side. This is the time for Sanders to show how you can win by losing. He has two choices: he can increasingly look like a spoiler, or he can stamp a claim on this cycle by landing the plane, and as Hillary Clinton did in 2008, get to work ensuring we have a unified party for this fall.

And the sooner, the better, as we have real work to do.

Let’s just take my home state of Florida. Since 1992, no state in the country has been more competitive – and for Republicans, there is no path to the White House without it. We win it, and the race is over. But trust me, as dysfunctional as the GOP looks now, they will get their act together.

Don’t believe me? Rick Scott couldn’t win either.

But in some ways, we start out in a tougher spot than eight years ago. Since the last open presidential election (2008), the GOP has cut the Democratic voter registration advantage by almost 380,000 voters. In other words, our 5 percent voter registration advantage in 2008 is 2 percent today. And whether you want to admit it or not, that has translated into them winning races down the ballot.

In addition, while I would argue that many of the voters we have lost were voters we had long ago lost, our coalition of voters now, while more loyal, are also more infrequent. Nearly 50 percent of our party coalition is now made up of ethnic minorities, voters who are historically less likely to turn out. In both 2008 and 2012, we were able to reverse these turnout trends – in 08, with the help of enthusiasm, and in 12, thanks to having more than a year to organize in the re-election. While I have nothing but honest respect for the field generals on the Clinton campaign, quite simply, the longer the campaign has to organize, the better positioned it will be to turn out Democratic voters at 08/12 levels. They know what they are doing, and it is time to let them get fully engaged on the real work.

Admittedly, I thought it was time to end it in March, after Bernie basically ceded Florida, though I understood why he kept going. Sanders’ campaign has done things, particularly in terms of engaging new grassroots donors, that we may never see again. But at this point, after tonight — and certainly after next week – there is no longer an argument for it continuing.

The primary is over. There is no path, and there is no math. So rather than taking a sledgehammer to each other, let’s go beat Trump.

Heavy RSVPs, pointed questions for Tommy Hazouri ahead of Jax Beaches Dems confab

Whether it’s the always-interesting 2016 election, Jacksonville’s pension fund issues, or the sudden congressional seat vacancy in the city, interest in politics is high on the First Coast at the moment.

In fact, it’s driving a huge RSVP response to the monthly Beaches Democratic Club meeting tonight in Neptune Beach, with a featured speech by Jacksonville City Councilman and former mayor Tommy Hazouri.

Hazouri may be the draw, “or maybe the word got out about my famous honey-baked chicken wings that I made for our Chicken Wings Dinner – left wings only, of course,” jokes Billee Bussard, club president.

With dozens expected for what in the past has been more of a sleepy affair, Bussard says pointed questions for Hazouri are already being submitted in advance, such as “Does your affiliation as a Democrat affect what you can accomplish on the Council?” (should be an interesting answer) to “Will you run for Congress, or get behind another Democrat for Corrine Brown‘s seat?” (hmm).

Also expect Hazouri to be pressed to support a state ban on fracking in Florida, as activists push Duval County to join other municipalities around the state to pass a resolution for a fracking ban.

And there’s this one from Bussard herself: “Tell us how you stand on Mayor Lenny Curry’s pension proposal and the August referendum.”

Hazouri, as this website has reported, denies claims he withdrew his support for an updated human rights ordinance in Jacksonville in exchange for supporting Curry’s pension tax referendum push.

 

NTSB search resumes today for the sunken El Faro cargo ship

The National Transportation Safety Board is set to resume its search today for the critical data recorder from the sunken El Faro cargo ship.

The 790-foot freighter sank during Hurricane Joaquin on Oct. 1, 2015, after leaving JAXPORT in Jacksonville, bound for San Juan, Puerto Rico. All 33 of the El Faro’s crew died at sea.

The NTSB says purpose of this second search is not only to find the ship’s vessel data recorder, but also better document the wreckage to help determine exactly why and how the ship sank.

In addition to navigational data, the ship’s so-called “black box” also contains voice data.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee which oversees the NTSB, has been vocal about the need to keep searching.

“Finding the El Faro’s missing data recorder is critical to understanding what went so tragically wrong that day,” Nelson said in a statement. “We owe it not only to the families of the lost mariners aboard the El Faro but to the future safety of all those who travel on the high seas to understand what happened and what we can do to ensure that it never happens again.”

The latest search effort will begin Monday when a “research vessel” departs from Charleston, S.C., and heads to the wreckage site near the Bahamas.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons