Patrick Murphy Archives - Page 5 of 73 - Florida Politics

Direct mail round-up: Jack Latvala reminds Pinellas voters what’s at stake this election

A new mailer from Clearwater Republican state Sen. Jack Latvala offers a simple message: “This election is not just about Washington D.C.”

Latvala’s mailer lets Pinellas County voters know what he believes is at stake this November — at both the state and local levels — with a handy voters’ guide for down-ballot races.

“It’s also about Florida and Pinellas County!” he says.

On the congressional level, the mailer suggests support for Republicans Marco Rubio for U.S. Senate and David Jolly for Florida’s 13th Congressional District. Photos of Democratic opponents — Congressman Patrick Murphy and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist — are shown shadowed with their faces crossed out.

“Of these men, who can best be trusted to keep our taxes low, our nation secure and government out of our lives,” the flyer says. “YOUR VOTE could make the difference in these races.”

As for representing Pinellas in Tallahassee, Latvala is joined by state Reps. Chris Latvala of House District 67 and Chris Sprowls of HD 65.

“Do we want to turn back the clock on our state to a time when crime rates were skyrocketing, taxes were increased every year, and our public schools had no accountability?” Latvala asks. “YOUR VOTE can keep leaders like Jack Latvala, Chris Sprowls, and Chris Latvala fighting for us in Tallahassee!”

Locally, the flyer endorses Mike Mikruak for Pinellas County Commissioner; if he wins, it could result in a return to Republican majority on the board.

“YOUR VOTE for Mike Mikurak can help Republicans win back the majority on our County Commission that was lost in 2014 for the first time in 50 years!” the mailer says.

With such discord at the top of the presidential ticket this year, Latvala’s flyer reminds us that all politics — and good governance — is indeed local.

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Randy Perkins sinks another $1M into CD 18 race, 2nd since Oct. 20

Democratic CD 18 candidate Randy Perkins put another $1 million of his own money into his campaign last week, according to a new notice filed with the Federal Election Commission.

Perkins’ Oct. 27 contribution follows a separate $1 million cash infusion he made Oct. 20, and he has now put nearly $8 million of his own money into his campaign since filing for the seat.

Through Oct. 19, Perkins had only raised about $685,000 through individual contributions.

Brian Mast, Perkins’ Republican opponent in the race to take over for exiting U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy, also filed a trio of new notices with the FEC ahead of the weekend, showing about $95,000 in new contributions.

Most of Mast’s contributions came in from individuals, though he did get a little help from former Florida U.S. Sen. George LeMieux as well as U.S. Reps. David McKinley of West Virginia and Andy Harris of Maryland.

Due to self-funding, Perkins holds a strong lead in total fundraising and had about $233,000 on hand Oct. 19. Mast, through the same date, had raised about $2.3 million and had about $400,000 of that money on hand.

CD 18 covers the whole of St. Lucie and Martin counties as well as part of northern Palm Beach County and has a near-even voter registration split between Republicans and Democrats.

The district voted narrowly for Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney four years ago.

New Senate Leadership Fund ad blasts Patrick Murphy for lying about, well, everything

A new ad from the Senate Leadership Fund blasts U.S. Senate hopeful Patrick Murphy with a litany of what they say are his sins – lying, embellishing and not doing much in Congress.

The criticisms have been leveled before by Murphy’s detractors and his opponent Marco Rubio – the ad says Murphy lied about everything from his business record to his education.

“He lied about his education,” the ad states. “Murphy’s claims of business experience, outright false. Why did he pad his resume? He doesn’t have a record. He was ranked one of America’s least effective congressmen. In a do nothing congress, Murphy’s at the bottom of the barrel.”

The ad says it’s “no wonder” Murphy “misleads, exaggerates and outright lies” about all of those things.

“Marco Rubio and his allies are getting desperate as the polls have tightened and Patrick’s campaign has the momentum,” said Galia Slayen with the Murphy campaign. “Marco Rubio earned the worst voting record of any Florida Senator in nearly 50 years. He supports sexual abuser Donald Trump for president, but refuses to answer if he trusts Trump to keep us safe. Rubio’s special interest allies are trying to distract from his spineless cowardice with this false and desperate attack ad. Floridians deserve better.”

Barack Obama: ‘This is the moment where America has to take a stand’

At the University of Central Florida Friday night, a triumphant-sounding Barack Obama made a bold declaration to voters — in this election, no less than the direction of America was at stake.

The president, no doubt buoyed by resurgent popularity and comforted by the realization that the end is near, proclaimed fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton a worthy bearer of his progressive legacy.

“This is the moment where America has to take a stand and decide what it is what we believe in and who we are,” Obama told 9,000 people inside the CFE Arena, and a reported 7,000 more outside.

“And we’re not going to believe in fear. Instead, we’re going to lift up hope. If you want hope instead of fear, then you will elect Hillary Clinton as president of the United States!”

That stand, in Obama’s words, is for a more progressive America.

In his 42-minute speech, Obama acknowledged he didn’t accomplish everything he wanted, and that he made some mistakes.

But he did boast a list of accomplishments: 20 million more people on health insurance, reducing dependence on foreign oil, recognizing global warming and fighting to reduce carbon emissions. He also promoted his expansion of Civil Rights, preservation of abortion rights, the fight for women’s rights, reduced unemployment, increased wages, and the creation of a country where “You can marry the person you love.”

“Across the board, by almost every measure,” he said, “we are significantly better off now than we were eight years ago.”

“All the progress we’ve made over the last eight years goes out the window if we don’t win this election,” he added.

Obama seldom mentioned Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump‘s name — calling him “that other guy” — but repeatedly compared him with Clinton, characterizing the Democratic candidate as prepared and optimistic, while Trump was unprepared and fear mongering.

At one point, Obama praised Clinton as a meticulous hard-worker, who knows issues in depth, accusing Trump of “just making stuff up.”

“You don’t want at the slacker as your president,” he said. “You want somebody that knows what they’re talking about.”

Using his speech in front of a college student-dominated crowd, Obama pushed for the election of Democratic U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy over Republican incumbent U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio.

Obama criticized Rubio for taking many of the conservative stands that he said would end many of his progressive initiatives, including a vote to defund Planned Parenthood, opposing abortion, walking away from comprehensive immigration reform and “the Latino community;” and not believing in climate change.

That led the crowd, which often cheered Obama with defining, high screams — as if at a 1964 Beatles concert — to chant, “Patrick, Patrick, Patrick.”

But the chant never gained momentum and died off pretty quickly.

When Obama took a brief swipe at Trump’s comments about and alleged behavior toward women, a man in the back of the arena climbed over the railing of the upper deck, positioned himself on folded-back risers, and began shouting: “Bill Clinton is a rapist!”

It went on for several minutes before an Orange County deputy sheriff managed to talk him back over the railing and escorted him out.

Obama described an optimistic and diverse America, saying, “That’s the America I love.

“That’s why through all the ups and downs I haven’t been worried about this country,” he continued.

“Because, I’ve seen the heart and soul of the American people, and it is good, and it is decent, and it is strong, and it is resilient, and there is only one candidate in this race who I believe can continue the progress that we’ve made, and I know that because she’s been working all her life to make America better. And that’s the next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton.”

American Federation of Teachers relaunches ad targeting Marco Rubio

The American Federation of Teachers is relaunching an ad campaign opposing Marco Rubio.

The organization announced Friday it was reviving its campaign claiming Rubio “flip-flopped from writing legislation to provide relief to Puerto Rico to siding with hedge funds.”

“Time and time again, Marco Rubio has revealed where his allegiance lies. Rubio flip-flopped from writing legislation to provide relief for Puerto Rico, to siding with hedge funds demanding that Puerto Rico make deeper cuts in education and impose regressive taxes in order to pay off distressed debt,” said Michelle Ringuette, head of the organization’s political program. “As a result, 200 schools closed and millions of dollars were cut from education. During a time when Puerto Rico and Rubio’s constituents needed him in the face of a humanitarian crisis, Rubio came out on the side of pernicious hedge funds.”

The five-figure ad campaign will consist of one English-language statewide campaign ad. The organization ran the ad for two weeks earlier in the election cycle, according to the American Federation of Teachers.

Miami GOP rainmaker Mike Fernandez endorses Patrick Murphy, gives $100K

Mike Fernandez is backing Democrat Patrick Murphy in his race against Republican Marco Rubio for the U.S. Senate.

Fernandez, the Miami billionaire who is one of the nation’s largest GOP funders, announced his support of Murphy to the Miami Herald Friday morning. He told reporters the main reason he’s voting for Murphy is the Jupiter Democrat’s support for lifting the Cuba embargo.

As well as voting for Murphy, the Herald also reports Fernandez has given $100,000 to a pro-Murphy super PAC.

Fernandez has been a longtime Republican fundraiser — giving more than $3 million this cycle to a super PAC supporting Jeb Bush’s presidential run — and briefly served as finance chair for Gov. Rick Scott‘s 2014 re-election bid.

However, in September Fernandez announced he was formally endorsing Hillary Clinton for president.

 

Florida poll gives Hillary Clinton 4 point lead; calls Marco Rubio-Patrick Murphy race tied

A new Public Policy Polling survey commissioned by the gun-law-reform group Americans For Responsible Solutions finds that gun law reforms are an overwhelming issue for Floridians and that Hillary Clinton leads Donald Trump by four points in the Sunshine State and Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy are tied.

The PPP poll, done for the political action committee founded by Democratic former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords and her husband, retired NASA astronaut and Navy Capt. Mark Kelly, gives Democratic presidential nominee Clinton a 48 percent to 44 percent lead over Republican Trump. It also says Republican Sen. Rubio and Democratic U.S. Rep. Murphy are tied in Florida’s U.S. Senate race with 46 percent apiece.

The survey was conducted Tuesday and Wednesday among 742 likely Florida voters, with a mixture of telephone and internet interviews. PPP claims a margin of error of 3.6 percent.

Yet the real purpose of the poll was to drill down on how much gun issues are likely to impact votes in this election, and the results suggest they will be a major factor.

“Greater than nine in 10 Florida voters, 94 percent, say that making it harder for criminals to get guns is either a ‘very important’ or ‘somewhat important’ issue for them in the upcoming election — similar to the 95 percent who say creating jobs is important, 95 percent who say improving education is important, and 96 percent who say protecting Social Security is important. Seventy-four percent of Florida voters say abortion is an important issue for them this year,” states the poll analysis memo, written by PPP’s Justin Mayhew.

The memo was released Friday by Murphy’s campaign. Neither PPP nor AFRS has released the poll on its website or in press releases, and neither organization was immediately available to talk about it Friday. No cross-tabs, showing details on how voters responded to specific questions, were immediately available.

The most recent public poll conducted by PPP, done Oct. 12 and 13 and released Oct. 14, also gave Clinton a four-point lead, but had Rubio leading Murphy by five points.

The new poll done for AFRS also finds undecided voters are looking at gun violence prevention as a major factor in their upcoming vote. Of the 9 percent of voters who haven’t committed to a candidate for Senate, 82 percent said making it harder for criminals to get guns is an important issue, 72 percent said they support background checks on all gun sales, and 70 percent said they support prohibiting individuals on the FBI Terror Watch List from buying guns.

 

Jeanette Rubio highlights husband’s support of the Girls Count Act in new ad

Jeanette Rubio is praising her husband’s work against human trafficking in a new campaign ad.

The Marco Rubio campaign released a new advertisement Friday featuring the Miami Republican’s wife. The 30-second spot gives Jeanette Rubio a chance to highlight the Girls Count Act, which helps ensure children in developing countries are registered at birth.

“Human trafficking is a tragedy. Of all the things Marco has done, the Girls Count Act is the one thing I’m most proud of,” says Jeanette Rubio in the advertisement. “Marco wrote the law that forces any country in the word that receives American aid to give little girls birth certificates when they are born. It doesn’t sound like much, but that one thing could save thousands of girls, and even if it just saves one, it is truly a blessing.”

According to Girl Up, a program run by the United Nations Foundation, one in 12 people around the world is a girl or young woman between the ages of 10-24. The organization reported most developing counties did not account for the number of girls in their population. In some countries, the reason might be that they don’t have the capacity to do it, while some “don’t prioritize girls.”

“This means that as a girl grows up it will be difficult, if not impossible, for her to attend school or get a job. She will not be able to own her own land or start her own business,” according to the Girl Up website. “She will not be able to vote.  She will likely be confined to the home and left unpaid — an invisible member of society.”

President Barack Obama signed the bill, which was sponsored by Rubio, into law in June 2015.

“There is a massive worldwide problem involving boys and especially girls for whom no official records exist because they were not registered at birth,” said Rubio in a March 2015 statement introducing the bill. “This leaves them vulnerable to human trafficking and exploitation, but it also leaves them excluded from accessing basic services in their countries, such as education.”

Rubio faces Rep. Patrick Murphy in the Nov. 8 general election. Rubio has been leading in the polls for months, with RealClearPolitics showing he has an average 3.6 percent lead over Murphy.

Marco Rubio rallies the faithful during Naples stop

Sen. Marco Rubio used a stop in deep-red Collier County to gin up supporters and encourage Floridians to get out and vote.

The Miami Republican held a get-out-the vote rally in Naples on Thursday. The campaign stop came just one day after the second and final U.S. Senate debate, and Rubio used the stop to hammer Rep. Patrick Murphy over his limited congressional accomplishments.

“I’m running against someone who has been in Congress for four years; he’s not a theory, he’s not a businessman that’s coming in from the outside,” he told a crowd of about 200 people at 7th Avenue Social in downtown Naples, one block from a popular early voting location. “He’s been in Congress for four years, and yet he’s never had a bill that he wrote that has been passed into law.”

Rubio resorted to familiar attacks, pointing to claims Murphy padded his resume. The claims have been a frequent point of contention during the election, and have been at the center of several attack ads.

He criticized Murphy, honing in on comments the Treasure Coast Democrat made during the debate Wednesday.

“(He said) ‘when I got to Congress I started a bipartisan group. So I just passed all these laws, I’m banned from going to Nicaragua, I’m banned from going to Venezuela … and he’s bragging about starting a club,” said Rubio. “We cannot afford a U.S. senator from one of the most important states in the country that can’t get things done on behalf of you.”

The rally was meant to energize supporters in a deep red county. There are 199,889 registered voters in Collier County, 51 percent of whom are registered Republicans.

He hoped to tap back into that support network Thursday, encouraging the crowd to “vote early.”

“Vote once, and vote right,” he said, after joking he wanted to tell supporters to vote early and often. “We’ll win; we’ll turn this country around. We’re going to leave our children as the freest and most prosperous Americans that ever lived, and Florida as most prosperous state in America.”

According to the Division of Elections, as of Thursday more than 2.4 million had already cast their ballots.

“We’re not just choosing between political parties and ideologies, we’re choosing between two very different destinies: An America greater and ever more prosperous than before, or a once-great nation in decline,” said Rubio. “That is the crossroads with which we are at, and we must make a choice right now and it begins in this election.”

 

Marco Rubio: ‘I don’t have any plan, any intention, any desire to run for office in 2020’

Marco Rubio sidestepped questions about Donald Trump, saying voters “will have to make their own decisions” about the Republican nominee.

“I think every race has to stand on its own; I’ve said that from the beginning,” said Rubio, following a campaign stop in Naples on Thursday. “If he wins, that doesn’t mean I win. If he loses, that doesn’t mean I lose. I think every candidate is going to have to stand on their own merits and their own ideas.”

The Miami Republican has been criticized in recent weeks for his continued support of Trump. Rep. Patrick Murphy continually brought up the New York businessman during a televised debate Wednesday, and has been hammering Rubio over his decision to back him.

But Rubio said he has “strong disagreements” with both candidates, and backs Trump because he doesn’t “want Hillary Clinton to be president.”

“People look at this (race) and say these are not ideal choices,” said Rubio. “But that’s one of the reasons I ran for Senate, because I know no matter who wins, we’re going to have to have a strong Senate.”

Rubio announced he was running for re-election just days before the qualifying deadline. His decision came after he repeatedly said he would not run for re-election after mounting a failed presidential bid.

Whether Rubio would run for president again in 2020 has been a question from opponents and on the campaign trail. During the first U.S. Senate debate, he said he planned to serve a full six-year term. He reiterated that Thursday, telling reporters he doesn’t plan to run in 2020.

“If I wanted to run for president, I wouldn’t have run for Senate. This is the toughest swing state in the country, and I got in at the very last minute after running a presidential race, so I’m focused on serving in the Senate,” said Rubio. “I don’t have any plan, any intention, any desire to run for any other office in 2020. I look forward to being in the Senate for six years and achieving a lot on behalf of our state.”

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