Tim Bryce – Florida Politics

Tim Bryce: What to expect from the GOP on Super Tuesday

The GOP candidates are now sprinting to Super Tuesday. Donald Trump has the momentum from victories in New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada.

However, this is a big contest and no primary should be taken for granted.  Trump also has the advantage of holding good polling numbers going into Tuesday’s elections.

The Super Tuesday voting includes: Alabama, Alaskan caucuses, Arkansas, Colorado caucuses, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota caucuses, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming caucuses.

In looking over the latest polls, as maintained by Real Clear Politics, here is where the candidates stand:

ALABAMA – 50 delegates

+21 – Trump

Note: Alabama has not conducted a reliable poll since August.

Presumed winner: Trump

ALASKA – 28 delegates

28% – Trump

24% – Cruz

09% – Carson

Presumed winner: Trump

ARKANSAS – 40 delegates

27% – Cruz

23% – Trump

23% – Rubio

Presumed winner: Cruz

COLORADO – 37 delegates

+6 – Carson

Note: Colorado has not conducted a reliable poll since November.

Presumed winner: Unknown

GEORGIA – 76 delegates

34.7% – Trump

23.7% – Cruz

14.7% – Rubio

Presumed winner: Trump

MASSACHUSETTS – 42 delegates

41.0% – Trump

17.0% – Rubio

10.0% – Cruz

Presumed winner: Trump

MINNESOTA – 38 delegates

20.7% – Trump

14.7% – Rubio

13.7% – Carson

Presumed winner: Trump

OKLAHOMA – 43 delegates

32.5% – Trump

25.0% – Cruz

15.5% – Rubio

Presumed winner: Trump

TENNESSEE – 58 delegates

+4 – Trump

Note: Tennessee has not conducted a reliable poll since November.

Presumed winner: Unknown

TEXAS (Sen. Cruz’s home state) – 172 delegates

37.3% – Cruz

28.0% – Trump

11.7% – Rubio

Presumed winner: Cruz

VERMONT – 16 delegates

32.0% – Trump

17.0% – Rubio

11.0% – Cruz

Presumed winner: Trump

VIRGINIA – 49 delegates

28% – Trump

22% – Rubio

19% – Cruz

Presumed winner: Trump

WYOMING – 29 delegates

Note: Wyoming has not conducted a reliable poll since July.

Presumed winner: Unknown

So far, all of the primaries have attracted record voters, thanks in large part to Trump’s popularity. If this continues through Super Tuesday, he may become unstoppable.

The real prize on Super Tuesday is Texas with 172 delegates. This is Sen. Ted Cruz’s home state, but he may not have a lock on it.

With his weak showing in Nevada and the recent firing of his communications director for fraudulent statements about the other candidates, the Cruz campaign appears to be running out of steam while Marco Rubio is on the rise.

All of this might cost Cruz his home state which may very well go to Trump. It is entirely possible Cruz may come up empty on Super Tuesday while Rubio hangs on and Trump corners the market.

In looking over the delegate count, it is possible Trump may win as many as 300-plus delegates following Super Tuesday. Cruz may win up to 200-plus, assuming he wins Arkansas and Texas.

After Super Tuesday, the next two important dates are:

MARCH 8

MICHIGAN – 59 delegates

33.7% – Trump

13.0% – Kasich

12.7% – Cruz

Presumed winner: Trump

MARCH 15

FLORIDA – 99 delegates

40.0% – Trump

19.0% – Cruz

13.7% – Rubio

Presumed winner: Trump

OHIO (Kasich’s home state) – 66 delegates

31% – Trump

26% – Kasich

21% – Cruz

Presumed winner: Trump

It will be embarrassing if Kasich loses Ohio. Likewise for Rubio if Florida goes to Trump, which will likely happen. By losing their home states, they will have to seriously consider abandoning the race.

This can earn Trump another 200-plus delegates, bringing his total to more than 600, almost half of all of the delegates needed to secure the nomination (1,237).

This tsunami of support will make it nearly impossible for any other candidate to catch up with Trump. By March 16, he won’t have all of the delegates needed to win, but the GOP establishment should realize it’s all over but the shouting.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida.  @timbryce Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Presidents Day — Could they be elected today?

It’s Presidents Day again, a day when the schools and banks are closed, the local, state and federal bureaucracies leave us alone, and everyone else is busy working to pay for it all.

The holiday goes back as far as 1879 and was originally intended to honor George Washington.  This was later amended to include Abraham Lincoln, widely considered the savior of the Union.

Interestingly, it is celebrated on the third Monday of February, which doesn’t coincide with either president’s birthday.  Washington was born on Feb. 22, 1732, in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809, in Hodgenville, Kentucky.

The third Monday was selected as a compromise between the two birthdays.  Because of the selection of the third Monday of February, the day never lands on either president’s exact birthday.

Although it was initially designed to honor Washington, then Lincoln, it was later intended to honor all presidents, yet most people think of it as it pertains to just our first and 16th presidents.

A few years ago, historians were asked if either Washington or Lincoln could win a presidential election today, as well as some of our other famous presidents.  It was agreed the only president who might have a chance was Washington due to his sheer character.

I’m not sure character alone would cut it anymore.

You must remember that Washington was a plantation owner, capable military figure, and even a distiller of whiskey, but he was not an educated man. He was one of the few founding fathers without a college education.

He also owned slaves and had it not been for the money his wife Martha brought with her from a previous marriage, Washington would have likely gone bankrupt.  All of this would have been fodder for the media of today.

Historians rave about Lincoln’s wit and oratory skills, and the strength he demonstrated during our horrific Civil War. However, comedians today would have lampooned his lanky build, mussed clothes, and western voice. “Saturday Night Live” would eat him for lunch.

Teddy Roosevelt would be ridiculed for his squeaky voice. Thomas Jefferson would not be remembered as the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, the Louisiana Purchase, or for sanctioning the Lewis & Clark expedition.  Instead, he would have been exposed for his marital infidelity with one of his slaves, Sally Hemings.

James Madison would not be remembered as the “Father of the Constitution” or the champion of the Bill of Rights, but for allowing the White House and Congress to be burned by the British.  Even FDR, Ronald Reagan, JFK, Ike, and many others would be badly tarnished in today’s political atmosphere.

It’s not that these presidents have changed. What’s changed is our morality and judgment and the power of the media.  True, none of these presidents were perfect, but they somehow managed to accomplish a lot.  Regardless, more than anything else they would be attacked for their character as opposed to their accomplishments.

We should remember this as we go about the process of selecting a new president.

So, what does Presidents Day mean to me?  It’s a reminder we should elect people based on our own perceptions of their capabilities, and not rely on what the media tells us.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. timbryce.com.

Tim Bryce: Presidents' Day – Could they be elected today?

It’s Presidents’ Day again, a day when the schools and banks are closed, the local, state and federal bureaucracies leave us alone, and everyone else is busy working to pay for it all.

The holiday goes back as far as 1879 and was originally intended to honor George Washington.  This was later amended to include Abraham Lincoln, widely considered the savior of the Union.

Interestingly, it is celebrated on the third Monday of February, which doesn’t coincide with either president’s birthday.  Washington was born on Feb. 22, 1732 in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809 in Hodgenville, Kentucky.

The third Monday was selected as a compromise between the two birthdays.  Because of the selection of the third Monday of February, the day never lands on either president’s exact birthday.

Although it was originally designed to honor Washington, then Lincoln, it was later intended to honor all presidents, yet most people think of it as it pertains to just our first and 16th presidents.

A few years ago, historians were asked if either Washington or Lincoln could win a presidential election today, as well as some of our other famous presidents.  It was agreed the only president who might have a chance was Washington due to his sheer character.

I’m not sure character alone would cut it anymore.

You must remember that Washington was a plantation owner, capable military figure, and even a distiller of whiskey, but he was not an educated man. He was one of the few founding fathers without a college education.

He also owned slaves and had it not been for the money his wife Martha brought with her from a previous marriage, Washington would have likely gone bankrupt.  All of this would have been fodder for the media of today.

Historians rave about Lincoln’s wit and oratory skills, and the strength he demonstrated during our horrific Civil War. However, comedians today would have lampooned his lanky build, mussed clothes, and western voice. “Saturday Night Live” would eat him for lunch.

Teddy Roosevelt would be ridiculed for his squeaky voice. Thomas Jefferson would not be remembered as the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, the Louisiana Purchase, or for sanctioning the Lewis & Clark expedition.  Instead, he would have been exposed for his marital infidelity with one of his slaves, Sally Hemings.

James Madison would not be remembered as the “Father of the Constitution” or the champion of the Bill of Rights, but for allowing the White House and Congress to be burned by the British.  Even FDR, Ronald Reagan, JFK, Ike, and many others would be badly tarnished in today’s political atmosphere.

It’s not that these presidents have changed. What’s changed is our morality and judgment and the power of the media.  True, none of these presidents were perfect, but they somehow managed to accomplish a lot.  Regardless, more than anything else they would be attacked for their character as opposed to their accomplishments.

We should remember this as we go about the process of selecting a new president.

So, what does Presidents’ Day mean to me?  It’s a reminder we should elect people based on our own perceptions of their capabilities, and not rely on what the media tells us.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Education is the key to reducing gun violence

Let me begin by saying I believe everyone in the country should attend a gun-safety class.

Whether you support or oppose restrictions on gun ownership, every citizen should attend such a class, be it privately taught, in schools, or some other venue. If you are unfamiliar with the class, let me clear up an important misconception: it is NOT about gun advocacy, it is about gun safety.

Although such classes vary from state to state, it is essentially used to teach the fundamentals of how a gun should be used, stored and maintained. It teaches the pertinent laws associated with gun ownership and use.

I took such a class a few years ago here in Florida and was very impressed by the knowledge and professionalism of the instructor. Again, this was less about the actual firing of the weapon as opposed to a description of the various types of weapons (e.g., rifle, shotgun, semiautomatic, single and double action revolvers, etc.), what their capabilities are, gun safety “do’s and do nots,” and what to do in an emergency.

For example, in the class I attended, the instructor gave pragmatic advice about what to do if someone breaks into your home while you are there. It wasn’t so much about shooting the intruder as opposed to contacting authorities and protecting yourself.

Overall, I found the class to be equally useful for experienced gun owners as well as the uninitiated.
While some people see gun control as the answer to solving accidents and assaults with guns, I believe an educated populace would save more lives and result in fewer victims.

An informed public is less likely to become a victim and more likely to survive a shooting situation. Anyone who has attended such a class would probably agree that education is the key. Everyone from middle school onward should be taught gun safety.

Even children in elementary grades should learn some of the basics.
Again, let me be clear, this is not about gun advocacy or how to hurt anyone, and it certainly is not intended to glamorize guns, which we will leave to Hollywood.

Instead, it is about safety and knowing what to do in dangerous situations. It is about survival.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Reports of dirty tricks during Iowa vote

The Iowa caucuses are now in the books and the candidates have moved on to the next battlefield, New Hampshire.

But there are some nagging questions about dirty dealings in Iowa.  As we all know, the caucuses are conducted differently than regular voting.

There are rumors that voter identification was not checked, allowing anyone to attend any of the caucuses and vote.

However, Breitbart reported what seems to be an odd coincidence. Six Democratic precincts were deadlocked, causing officials to toss a coin to break the tie.

In all six coin-tosses, Hillary Clinton remarkably won.  The odds of doing so are 64-to-1.  The Des Moines Register noted that one coin toss, coming from a precinct in Ames, was conducted even when “60 caucus participants apparently disappeared from the proceedings.”

Another report claims Sen. Bernie Sanders accused Mrs. Clinton of using a paid out-of-state staffer as a precinct captain, very much a no-no in Iowa.

Politico reported that Ben Carson took issue with Ted Cruz, claiming campaigners were spreading falsehoods that Carson had suspended his campaign just prior to the caucuses.  Even Rep. Steve King, a Cruz supporter, was caught tweeting, “Carson looks like he is out. Iowans need to know before they vote. Most will go to Cruz, I hope.”

Carson is understandably upset and is demanding Cruz fire anyone in his campaign who is guilty of the offense.

Finally, a photo surfaced showing precinct captains counting votes from the Dallas County GOP caucus at a brewpub.  It wasn’t very flattering and didn’t suggest a professional image in counting votes.

So, here we are at the dawn of a new primary season and learning of sloppy electoral practices and questionable campaigning tactics.  One can only wonder what is next.  Will we be returning to graveyard precincts?

Let’s hope the other primary states and campaigners clean up their act before New Hampshire.

***

Tim Bryce is an independent writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida.  timbryce.com   Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Understanding the Trump personality

The media and a substantial number of people in this country do not seem to understand Donald Trump, claiming he is crude, racist, greedy, and worse.

The reality is, they really do not understand such a person.  In my 40 years of travel through the corporate world, I have met my fair share of Donald Trumps, be it here in North America or overseas.  He is certainly not unique.

In psychological parlance, people such as Trump possess a “Type A” personality (there are four:  A, B, C, and D).

The “Type A” person possesses a strong entrepreneurial spirit, typically representing the captains of industry.  These are the “movers and shakers.” As gamblers, they know how to quickly calculate risk and will not proceed until they are convinced it is the correct course of action.

Occasionally they are wrong, but they are smart enough to know how to back out of a deal as opposed to continuing uninterrupted to disaster.

One key attribute is their stubborn independence.  As mavericks, they hold the cards and want to play the game their way.  They do not like to be told what to do.

It is extremely difficult to paint such people into a corner as they are always thinking two or three steps ahead.  This explains why they want to dominate a situation and are competitively driven.

Such people are normally quite intelligent, be it through formal education, pedigree, or a healthy dose of common sense.  I met one such person who did not have much of an education, other than a high school diploma, yet possessed uncanny street smarts.

He understood what the market wanted, created a company from nothing, and made it a first-class operation.  I found him to have more savvy about his industry than 90 percent of the corporate managers I have met.

To the “Type A” person, the company is an extension of his personality.  If it is successful, he is successful.  The same is true with failure.

Not surprising, they are driven by accomplishment and possess a no-nonsense approach to business. They are not easily distracted.  They are usually well organized and understand the power of communications.  Project delays and cost overruns are closely monitored.  They can understand accidents and forces detrimental to project completion, but the one thing they cannot tolerate is incompetence.

Consequently, the “Type A” person prefers frankness to excuses.

It is not unusual for the “Type A” to become a friendly bully to encourage others to improve their performance.  Normally, they have an acerbic tongue and challenge their people through cynical teasing.  They are interested in challenging a person rather than just being overbearing.

To them, they are trying to use humor as a tool, but not everyone appreciates that.  While some may take such criticism negatively, “Type A” people normally are fair in their observations.  Aside from this, they have a playful side and an infectious enthusiasm that inspires workers and creates loyalty. This also causes customers and vendors to like them.

The “Type A” person understands the power of appearances, and dresses accordingly.  Likewise, they are acutely aware of business etiquette and use it for their benefit, such as making introductions, thanking people, tipping, commending employees, buying gifts and more.

Not everyone appreciates a “Type A” person. “Type D” personalities resist change and prefer the predictability of routine operations. They are not adventurous, resist responsibility and prefer to be told what to do.  They are the antithesis of the “Type A” and will naturally clash with them.

The question before American voters is whether a “Type A” businessman like Trump could be an effective president.

Before we answer, let us consider the effects of having presidents who were a peanut farmer, a community organizer, professional politicians, and oilmen.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Just listen to people and you can learn a lot

Last month I attended an Art Festival in the downtown area of Palm Harbor. This is a typical small town affair attracting no more than a couple of thousand people.

The downtown street was closed to traffic so vendors could erect tents and displays for their wares. I volunteered to assist in the registration of voters for the 2016 election.

This was a first for me, so I didn’t quite know what to expect. Now, I know some of you will say, “Wait Tim, you’re a Republican; Republicans don’t want people to vote.”

“Au contraire” my liberal opponents. You have to remember, I come from a generation who believes you do not have the right to complain about the country unless you are at least willing to vote. It is the most fundamental way of demonstrating your civic responsibility.

The organizer of the event had a simple table and chairs for us to distribute Florida standard voter registration forms. The form served three purposes: to register a new voter, to change voter address, and to change political parties.

This was a party-neutral activity as we would assist anyone with their registration needs, regardless of their party affiliation. As we sat there, we would cheerfully ask passersby if they were registered to vote.

I was pleasantly surprised to find most of the people were already registered, and we would thank them for being so. We also ran into some people who growled they had no interest in voting whatsoever, which I still do not comprehend.

We had a few dozen who were new to the area and wanted to register, but most of the people wanted to change their address or party affiliation.

I was particularly surprised by the latter. These were Democrats who wanted to change to the GOP. Although most wouldn’t comment on their reasons, one woman in particular adamantly said, “Enough is enough.”

There were many people who wanted to engage us in conversation about politics. Topics included everything from Obamacare to ISIS and “Muslim extremists” to voter ID, to our fragile economy.

We also heard opinions about the candidates, particularly Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. It was most illuminating to just sit back and listen to John Q. Public, who made it plain they were unhappy with the state of affairs in our country.

If you ever get a chance to participate in such an event, I encourage you to volunteer. First, it is not difficult to do, but more importantly, you will learn a lot about what people think of our system of government.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Obama’s speech shows that he’s living in Fantasyland

During his State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Barack Obama said we have a robust economy, yet we have a shrinking middle class and economic confidence is low.

He said his policies in the Middle East are working well, yet in Syria alone we have thousands of killings and millions of people deserting the country and moving to Europe where they are disrupting the social fabric of the continent.

And he is responsible for making Iran and ISIS much bigger than they should be.

“ISIS doesn’t threaten our existence…” he said. Really? Let’s ask the victims of San Bernardino, Paris, and the Philadelphia police office shot last week.

He said that during his term he wished he had more bipartisanship and cooperation, yet the truth is he was the divider-in-chief. He issued more executive orders than any other president in recent memory as opposed of working through the Congress.

Heck, even Ronald Reagan learned to work with Tip O’Neill, and Bill Clinton with Newt Gingrich.

He claimed national security should take precedence, yet polls show Americans feel less safe.

He claimed our veterans are being well taken care of, yet critical reports are still coming out about the effectiveness of the VA, and nobody has been fired.

He still wants to close Guantanamo Bay; yet he quietly releases prisoners who come back to fight against us in the Middle East. Why don’t we move them into his new presidential library instead?

And, no, we are no longer a respected superpower; we’re a laughingstock.

Liberals will doubtlessly claim his speech represented a beautiful ending to his presidency. The rest of us will see it for what it is: much ado about nothing.

Between the president’s liberal agenda, his refusal to work with Congress, his distortion of the truth, and the fact he lives in “Fantasyland,” he has created a culture of anger in the country.

Because of this, he is personally responsible for the rise of Donald Trump.

I wish we would go back to having the president deliver a written copy of the State of the Union. The histrionics of the speech have become a colossal waste of time. I suspect the ratings will be lower than last year’s, which was also very low.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: Older folks need their thermostats to stay comfortable

I’ve noticed that as we get older, we become more sensitive to temperature.

In our youth it really didn’t bother us. If it was cold, we put on a sweater or sweatshirt; if it was hot, t-shirts were the order of the day.

We didn’t think twice about going outside on a snowy day to play. Now we do.

Thanks to arthritis invading our joints along with muscle spasms, we become much more aware of temperature and constantly seek comfort from the thermostat. This probably explains why so many people from the North migrate to the South in winter.

Seniors who stay in the North during winter are inclined to keep a tight rein on the temperature dial. To illustrate, my in-laws in Cincinnati had a big house. Yet, in winter they kept the temperature in the 80’s. It was so warm inside that you would be sweating while it was frozen outside.

While other houses had snow on the roof, my in-laws’ roof was dry, even crispy. The radiating heat created a greenhouse effect whereby there was a dry three-yard perimeter around the house where foliage flourished and the grass remained green.

It is a strange sight to see crocus and daffodils in full bloom when it’s minus 30 degrees outside. There was no need to shovel snow near the front door as the cement was so toasty, you could walk barefoot outside.

In the summer, the house became Ice Station Zebra. They kept it so cold, you could see your breath and the windows were frosted requiring the occasional scraping and use of ice picks.

Spring and autumn are the awkward months as people go back and forth between the furnace and the air conditioner.

Here in Florida, we have learned to live with the heat as our friends in the North have learned to live with the snow. As for me, I’ll gladly take the heat. I lived my first 30 years in the North, and I remember too well the bulky layers of clothing, shoveling driveways, and being forced to stay indoors.

In Florida, I wear comfortable shorts year round, particularly when I do yard work. As an aside, if we learn a rare frost is in the offing, we cover our plants outside with old bed sheets.

Visiting northerners find it amusing to see our plants “put to bed” for the evening.

Even in Florida though, we become sensitive to the temperature as we get older. Most of the time we are unaware of it.

For example, my daughter recently came for a visit and complained how cold it was in the house.

Frankly, I hadn’t thought about it before she made the observation. I then walked around the house to make sure there was no frost on the windows requiring scraping.

***

Tim Bryce is a freelance writer in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. http://timbryce.com/ Column courtesy of Context Florida.

Tim Bryce: It's a good time to resolve to make the workplace better

Last January I wrote a column titled, “Hi Ho, Hi Ho, It’s Back to Work We Go” in which I gave advice to managers about making changes in the office that would help employees be more productive.

I discussed how some simple modifications in the office’s physical appearance can have a positive effect. Here, I would like to outline some attitudinal changes by office workers, including both management and the work force.

First, middle management should learn to manage more and supervise less (e.g., micromanage). They should treat workers like professionals, empower them to perform on their own, and try to stay out of their way.

The only time the manager should become involved is when a problem arises that cannot be solved by the workers, assigning new projects, and holding workers accountable for their actions. To make this effective, a reporting system must be devised to keep management apprised of the status of projects and activities.

This, of course means a Theory Y form of management where employees are managed from the “bottom-up” as opposed to autocratic rule from the top down.

Such an approach will cause workers to become more resourceful, innovative, and develop a sense of ownership over their work. That, in turn, promotes corporate loyalty.

Management also should manage the workplace and corporate culture to promote a professional atmosphere, high ethics, teamwork and courteous behavior. That strategy will cause workers to become more disciplined and develop a sense of pride in workmanship.

Two other ideas come to mind: first, making sure the staff understands the history of the business and their chosen craft; second, teach employees to “think big” by sharing with them the big picture of the business.

For example, if they are charged with a small part of a system, have them learn about the entire system so they understand how their role affects others.

Both middle management and workers should also be aware of the amount of money required to operate their section of the business. This means they should participate in developing a budget.

By doing so, it makes them conscious of profit and loss, which helps to focus their priorities and incentives.

Workers also need to adjust their attitude. Instead, of watching the clock, they should learn more about the products they are producing. In other words, they need to be equally cognizant of quality as well as speed.

They also should project a professional image by being courteous, ethical, neat in appearance and a team player. Their motto should be: “What I do not know, I will not fabricate an excuse but endeavor to learn the answer; what I do know, I will share with others.”

Senior workers should mentor young workers and be smart enough to listen to the younger workers who may have learned a new trick or two, particularly in the area of technology.

Conversely, younger workers should listen to their elders but challenge the status quo to seek better ways for performing tasks. They should constantly strive to improve their skills and learn the corporate history.

After all, there is no need to reinvent the wheel or commit the mistakes of their predecessors.

A little attitude adjustment and some resolutions for the new year can work wonders. As I mentioned last year, January is the time for management to implement innovations. Such changes should capture the attention of the work force and reinvigorate them for the year.

***

Tim Bryce is a writer and managing director of M&JB Investment Co. of Palm Harbor, Florida. He has more than 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com. Column courtesy of Context Florida.

 

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