Poll: Miami-Dade voters overwhelmingly oppose full abortion ban, deporting Dreamers
Image via The Associated Press.

abortion protest ap
No group broadly backed a full ban on abortion without exceptions, and there is strong support for a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers.

When it comes to women’s reproductive rights and whether to deport so-called Dreamers, Miami-Dade County voters hold nuanced opinions regardless of political affiliation, new polling data shows.

South Florida consulting firm Public Communicators Group surveyed 6,656 registered Miami-Dade voters online in English and Spanish Oct. 12-21. The survey had a 2% margin of error.

Pollsters asked respondents to share their thoughts on abortion and whether they support naturalization for immigrants who were illegally brought to the United States as children but have essentially grown up as Americans — a group known widely as Dreamers.

The firm separated results by party affiliation. The largest group represented, Republicans, comprised 2,798 respondents. Democrats followed with 2,111 respondents, while independent, no-party respondents rounded the survey out with 1,747 people polled.

“On abortion, no group supports an outright ban, and a plurality believe there should be no restrictions whatsoever,” said Democratic consultant Evan Ross, the firm’s CEO.

“On the issue of illegal immigrants brought to the United States as children, often referred to as Dreamers, support is strong for a pathway to citizenship, with Republicans only slightly preferring legal status.”

Abortion

GOP respondents in Miami-Dade held the most hardline views on both issues. But they still expressed some flexibility.

Just over half — 50.02% — said they support the Supreme Court’s decision in June to overturn Roe v. Wade, which kicked back down to states jurisdiction over abortion law.

However, only 8% back a full ban on abortion with no exceptions. The largest share, 40%, believe the practice should only be legal in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is at risk.

Nineteen percent said abortion should only be legal in the first trimester, while 9.5% held that abortion should be permitted “until the point of viability,” after which it should be allowed only to save the mother.

Notably, 15% said a woman should be able to terminate her pregnancy “at any time for any reason,” while 8% denied having an opinion on the matter.

Only 8% of Miami-Dade Republicans back a full ban on abortion with no exceptions. Image via Public Communicators Group.

Meanwhile, Democrats overwhelmingly opposed the SCOTUS ruling on Roe, with 87.5% saying they believed the decision was wrong.

Sixty-three percent of Democrats in Miami-Dade believe there should be no restrictions on a woman’s right to choose whether to go through with a pregnancy, while 12.6% said abortion should be legal until the point of viability and 11% said it should only be legal during the first trimester.

Nine percent believe abortion should only be legal in cases of rape, incest or to save the mother’s life, and just 1% backed a full abortion ban. About 3.5% said they didn’t have an opinion one way or the other.

Sixty-three percent of Democrats in Miami-Dade believe there should be no restrictions on a woman’s right to choose. Image via Public Communicators Group.

Independent voters also largely disagreed with Roe’s overturning at a more than two-to-one ratio, with 59.5% of respondents saying they did not support the decision compared to 24% who did.

Just 3% believe in an outright ban, while 39% said there should be no restrictions and 23% backed abortion only in cases of rape, incest or to save the life of the mother.

Twelve percent of independents back the right to abortion only until the end of the first trimester, and 9% denied having thoughts on the issue.

Independent voters disagreed with the overturning of Roe v. Wade by a more than two-to-one ratio. Image via Public Communicators Group.

Dreamers

There are some 800,000 young people in the U.S. protected from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which former President Barack Obama created by executive order in 2012 after the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act did not pass in Congress several times.

That failed legislation became the namesake for the people protected under DACA, which faced dissolution under Obama’s successor, Donald Trump, until an executive order by President Joe Biden preserved it.

But the program’s future remains uncertain. On Oct. 5, a federal appeals court determined Obama’s 2012 executive order violates immigration statutes but deferred a final rule on the matter to a district court.

Less than 16% of Miami-Dade Republicans want to deport Dreamers outright. The rest are roughly split on whether to allow paths to citizenship or legal status.

Nearly 40% of Republicans said Dreamers shouldn’t be permitted to become citizens but should have an opportunity to obtain legal status. Thirty-eight percent said a pathway to citizenship should be allowed.

Less than 16% of Miami-Dade Republicans want to deport Dreamers outright. Image via Public Communicators Group.

Democrats in Miami-Dade broadly supported bringing DACA recipients more into the American fold. Nearly 80% said there should be a path to citizenship, while another 14% said a path to legal status is more appropriate.

Just 3% said Dreamers should be deported to their country of origin. Roughly the same share denied having an opinion on the subject.

Overall, 94% of Democrats in Miami-Dade support paths to citizenship or legal status for Dreamers. Image via Public Communicators Group.

The preponderance of independent respondents in Miami-Dade feel similarly. Nearly 59% support a pathway to citizenship, while 27% favor a route to legal status.

Less than 8% think Dreamers should be deported back to their country of birth. Six percent said they had no opinion.

Twice as many independent voters in Miami-Dade prefer a path to citizenship for Dreamers than a path to legal status. Image via Public Communicators Group.

Details

Of the Republicans who responded to the poll, 47% were 55 or older, 51% were of Cuban descent, 27% identified as non-Cuban Hispanic or Latino and of the 75% who said they were Christian, two-thirds were Catholic. Other than 3.5% of Republican respondents who said they were Jewish, no other religious group had 1% or greater representation in the poll.

Democrats were similarly represented age-wise, with 46% of respondents being 55 or older. Twenty-eight percent said they were non-Cuban Hispanic or Latino compared to 21% of Cuban descent, 25% non-Hispanic White and 20% Black or African American.

While more Democratic respondents cited Christianity as their faith — including 30% who said they are Catholic and 24.5% who said they belonged to another form of Christian faith — 33% of Democrats polled said they were irreligious. Roughly 5.6% said they were Jewish, while 6.6% said they adhered to another faith.

Independent voters skewed younger, with just 42.5% aged 55 or older. Thirty-six percent were non-Cuban Hispanic or Latino, 27% were of Cuban descent, 21.6% were non-Hispanic White, 7.5% were Black or African American and 1.2% were Asian.

In terms of religion, 35% were Catholic, while 22% said they believed in another form of Christianity. Thirty-one percent were irreligious, while 3.5% were Jewish and nearly 9% held other religious beliefs.

Early voting in Miami-Dade is now underway. Election Day is Nov. 8.

Jesse Scheckner

Jesse Scheckner has covered South Florida with a focus on Miami-Dade County since 2012. His work has been recognized by the Hearst Foundation, Society of Professional Journalists, Florida Society of News Editors, Florida MMA Awards and Miami New Times. Email him at [email protected] and follow him on Twitter @JesseScheckner.


9 comments

  • marylou

    October 25, 2022 at 8:28 am

    Abortion is the #1 issue among 18-29 year old women in 2022 election:

    “despite constant reports in the media on inflation and rising prices as the top issues in this election, abortion and women’s rights are actually the most important for young women as they head to the ballot box.”
    —-Florida Politics (artical title: “Kathy Spillar: In Florida, abortion and equal rights are top issues for young women voters”)

    “Among young women voters ages 18-29 in the battleground states, abortion and women’s rights are the most important and highly motivating issues in determining their vote”—Poll cited in FP article (https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion)

    “Among women voters of all ages, abortion and women’s rights (at 31 percent) are just as critical as inflation and rising prices (at 32 percent), in determining their vote, and more important than crime (12 percent) or education (11 percent) regularly cited in media reports.” —-Poll cited in FP article (https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion)

  • marylou

    October 25, 2022 at 8:37 am

    ABORTION IS THE #1 ISSUE AMONG 18-29 YEAR OLD WOMEN IN 2022 ELECTION:
    “despite constant reports in the media on inflation and rising prices as the top issues in this election, abortion and women’s rights are actually the most important for young women as they head to the ballot box.”—-Florida Politics (artical title: “Kathy Spillar: In Florida, abortion and equal rights are top issues for young women voters”)

    “Among young women voters ages 18-29 in the battleground states, abortion and women’s rights are the most important and highly motivating issues in determining their vote”—Poll cited in FP article (~https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion)

    “Among women voters of all ages, abortion and women’s rights (at 31 percent) are just as critical as inflation and rising prices (at 32 percent), in determining their vote, and more important than crime (12 percent) or education (11 percent) regularly cited in media reports.” —-Poll cited in FP article (~https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion)

    Almost like media doesn’t want you to know..

  • Richard Eginton

    October 25, 2022 at 8:52 am

    This is a very misleading poll and article. Why would the polling firm, Public Communications Group, even have the, “full ban on abortion with no exceptions,” as a choice in the poll? There is no such position on the table in Florida.

    What the Florida Legislators passed was legal abortion for any reason within the first 15 weeks. That’s 3 months and 2 weeks. Three missed menstruations. Clearly there is time enough to make the choice within that time frame.

    • Impeach Biden

      October 25, 2022 at 10:17 am

      Currently over 90% of the abortions performed in Florida are performed before the 15th week. This will not turn the election tide. That’s all the “floor fan” wanted to talk about last night. It’s not sticking with the voters. Contraception has come a long way.

      • marylou

        October 25, 2022 at 12:18 pm

        Women don’t appreciate you telling them what they want and what is important to them. And women don’t want men deciding what rights women are ALLOWED to have.

        Desantis vetoed funding for contraceptives for poor women–because the Catholic Church told him contraceptives cause abortion of a fertilized egg! Like his church, Desantis wants to take away women’s contraceptive rights.

    • marylou

      October 25, 2022 at 3:03 pm

      “The most important issues for young women in deciding for whom to vote in November, are abortion, birth control, and the ERA.”–Poll

      The poll is not misleading. It reflects issues important to young women. A “full ban on abortion with no exceptions,” is a concern for women because there are states where bans without “life of woman” are being introduced, and state GOP platforms that specifically prohibit abortions to save the pregnant woman’s life. If re-elected, extremist Desantis is expected to sign a total ban– with estimated 50-50 chance of no exception for the woman’s life.

      Pregnant 10 year old rape victims and middle school incest victims are just a couple reasons 15 week abortion bans are cruel and life-threatening. Maybe forcing a child to carry her rapist’s pregnancy to term is not a concern for you. It is a concern for most women.

      ~https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion

    • marylou

      October 25, 2022 at 3:05 pm

      “The most important issues for young women in deciding for whom to vote in November, are abortion, birth control, and the ERA.”–Poll

      The poll is not misleading. It reflects issues important to young women. A “full ban on abortion with no exceptions,” is a concern for women because there are states where bans without “life of woman” are being introduced, and state GOP platforms that specifically prohibit abortions to save the pregnant woman’s life. If re-elected, extremist Desantis is expected to sign a total ban– with estimated 50-50 chance of no exception for the woman’s life.

      Pregnant 10 year old rape victims and middle school incest victims are just a couple reasons 15 week abortion bans are cruel and life-threatening. Maybe forcing a child to carry her rapist’s pregnancy to term is not a concern for you. It is a concern for most women.

      ~https://msmagazine.com/2022/10/18/women-voters-midterm-elections-abortion

    • marylou

      October 25, 2022 at 9:00 pm

      reply to your comment is below

    • Wendy

      October 26, 2022 at 10:00 am

      DeSantis has vowed to eliminate abortion altogether if he is reelected. Do you really think he is going to allow FL to be the only state in the south where you can get an abortion? And run for president? Of course not.

Comments are closed.


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