Ron DeSantis hails SCOTUS switch on Chevron deference

Ron DeSantis
The long-standing principle was upended in a case last week involving fishermen and fees.

Florida’s Governor isn’t holding back when it comes to the U.S. Supreme Court overturning a four-decade-old principle that he says “really empowered the administrative state.”

The conservative court sided with Atlantic herring fishermen in New Jersey and Rhode Island who challenged fees imposed to pay to have their catches tracked, in accordance with a National Marine Fisheries Service rule passed during the Donald Trump administration. In the process, the court satisfied a long-standing conservative wish list item.

Gov. Ron DeSantis argues that “the long and short of it is … who ultimately governs our society.”

“And the outcry on the left over the repeal of Chevron or the overruling of Chevron really shows how they view society. And those of us who welcome the decision to overrule Chevron, we believe in a conception of government that our Founding Fathers envisioned,” DeSantis said at Pensacola State College.

Indeed, the high court overruled lower court decisions in the cases that were rooted in the idea that Chevron deference, and the wide berth it gives unaccountable federal agencies, was settled law.

“There’s a lot of things that this big powerful bureaucracy can do,” DeSantis said.

“The question is: If they’re coming at you and they’re wrong on the law, do you have an ability to go in the court and have the court say, ‘You know what? You’re right on the law,’ and rule for you and give you relief? Or do you do this Chevron deference, which says, ‘Well, it doesn’t really matter if you’re actually right on the law, we are going to defer to what these experts in the bureaucracy think the law means’?”

He added that the decision “puts on a better foundation the separation of powers,” giving people standing to challenge federal agencies in court on the merit of the law.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

A.G. Gancarski

A.G. Gancarski has been the Northeast Florida correspondent for Florida Politics since 2014. He writes for the New York Post and National Review also, with previous work in the American Conservative and Washington Times and a 15+ year run as a columnist in Folio Weekly. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter: @AGGancarski


7 comments

  • Steven Kirn, Ph.D.

    July 1, 2024 at 12:08 pm

    OK. Do you trust SCOTUS (or other judges) to assess, say, the proper level of pollutants in water? (So many more examples…).
    Congress — thanks to the filibuster rule, and other procedural issues — seems frequently immobilized at even conducting its own business. And now, under the “Standard Oil” ruling, these decisions will now be punted to an already-overloaded judicial /legislative (and professionally unqualified) system? Seriously?!? This is a true train wreck for rational governance, however some might see it as ideologically “pure”.

    • Karen B

      July 1, 2024 at 1:14 pm

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    • MH/Duuuval

      July 1, 2024 at 12:58 pm

      Expect a torrent of lawsuits against agency actions, which might crowd out the Supreme’s ideological docket.

  • Gabriel

    July 1, 2024 at 12:12 pm

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  • Steven Kirn, Ph.D.

    July 1, 2024 at 12:26 pm

    This is a terrible ruling. As we have seen, the SCOTUS can slow-walk decisions, and it is incomprehensible to me that we would now assign decisions on, say, acceptable pollution levels, radioactive waste disposal, drug safety standards (I could go on) to legislatures (and courts) that can hardly deal with existing demands (or possess the appropriate expertise). No matter how ideologically “pure”, this simply flew in the face of any practical, rational decision process. And now, we see that even deploying the Navy SEAL team on an assassination mission of a domestic political opponent can argualbly be decreed an “official” act, with no recourse to even considering the “motive”.

  • MH/Duuuval

    July 2, 2024 at 5:16 pm

    Dee will do anything to deflect attention from the fact that he still owes a student loan of $17k some two decades after leading Haavahd. Pay up, cheapskate — you’re a millionaire now. Or, are you waiting for Biden to forgive your loan?

Comments are closed.


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