Medicaid Archives - Page 2 of 33 - Florida Politics

Puerto Rico governor asks Rick Scott for help addressing health care crisis

The governor of Puerto Rico has asked Gov. Rick Scott for his help in addressing the nation’s healthcare crisis.

In a letter to Scott dated March 17, Gov. Ricardo Rossello said his administration is working hard to stabilize the current fiscal fiscal and economic crisis and to “put the island back on a path of fiscal responsibility and economic growth.” However, he said the so-called Medicaid cliff that will come into effect before the end of 2017 threatens to derail Puerto Rico’s fiscal and economic efforts.

“This could lead to a full-blown collapse of our healthcare system,” he wrote. “Moreover, if this issue is not addressed by Congress in the very near future the fallout will be felt not only in Puerto Rico but also in the states, because the already high rate of migration of the U.S. citizens moving from Puerto Rico to the states will likely increase significantly, affecting Florida in particular.”

More than 440,000 residents of Puerto Rico have moved stateside between 2006 and 2015, driven mostly by better economic opportunities. The loss in population, he wrote to Scott, is “devastating because it decreases our tax base, erodes our consumer base, and diminishes our workforce, which all make our economic recovery more difficult.”

Rossello said he developed a fiscal plan approved by the Financial Oversight and Management Board, created under PROMESA, that reduces spending and spurs economic growth. But federal legislators need to address the Medicaid cliff and “ensure the success of these reforms.”

He asked for Scott’s help in “activating Florida’s congressional delegation as a voice of reason in Congress on this avoidable issue.”

“We are willing to do our part to provide greater accountability, increased spending controls, and prosecute any fraud, waste and abuse tied to federal healthcare dollars,” he wrote. “However, Congress must find a way to include Medicaid funding for Puerto Rico at current levels until ACA replacement comes into effect and must also help Puerto Rico obtain more equitable and fiscally sustainable federal healthcare funding going forward.”

House GOP health bill facing fresh House committee test

The White House and Republican leaders are talking to rank-and-file lawmakers about revising the GOP health care overhaul, hoping to keep a rebellion by conservatives and moderates from snowballing and imperiling the party’s showpiece legislation.

Four days after a congressional report projected the bill would pry coverage from millions of voters, signs of fraying GOP support for the legislation were showing. The measure would strike down much of former President Barack Obama‘s 2010 overhaul and reduce the federal role, including financing, for health care consumers and is opposed uniformly by Democrats.

In a fresh test of Republicans’ willingness to embrace the legislation, the House Budget Committee was considering the measure Thursday. Republicans expressed confidence the bill would be approved, but the vote could be tight. The panel can’t make significant changes but was expected to endorse non-binding, suggested changes to nail down votes.

The bill would eliminate the tax penalty that pressures people to buy coverage and the federal subsidies that let millions afford it, replacing them with tax credits that are bigger for older people. It would cut Medicaid, repeal the law’s tax increases on higher earning Americans and require 30 percent higher premiums for consumers who let coverage lapse.

Overt GOP opposition grew after the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office projected Monday that the legislation would push 24 million Americans off coverage in a decade and shift out-of-pocket costs toward lower income, older people. Obama’s law has provided coverage to around 20 million additional people

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters Wednesday that leaders could now make “some necessary improvements and refinements” to the legislation. But he declined to commit to bringing the measure to the House floor next week, a schedule Republican leaders have repeatedly said they intended to keep.

At a late rally in Nashville Wednesday, President Donald Trump said: “We’re going to arbitrate, we’re all going to get together, we’re going to get something done.”

Vice President Mike Pence met with House GOP lawmakers and pressed them to unite behind the legislation.

“‘It’s our job to get it out of here and get it to the Senate,'” Pence told Republicans, according to Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Fla. That would let Trump pressure “Democrats in these red states to come on board,'” Ross said, referring to Republican-leaning states where Democratic senators face re-election next year.

But insurgents still abound.

Conservatives want to end Obama’s expansion of Medicaid to 11 million additional low-income people next year, not 2020 as the bill proposes. They say a GOP proposed tax credit to help people pay medical costs is too generous, and they want to terminate all of Obama’s insurance requirements, including mandatory coverage of specified services like drug counseling.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., head of the hard-line conservative House Freedom Caucus, continued pushing for changes. He claimed at least 21 members of his group would oppose the measure as written; the bill would fail if 22 Republicans join all Democrats in opposing it.

But underscoring the push-pull problem GOP leaders face in winning votes, moderates feel the tax credits are too stingy, especially for low earners and older people. They oppose accelerating the phase-out of the Medicaid expansion and are unhappy with long-term cuts the measure would inflict on the entire program.

Terminating the Medicaid expansion in 2020 and not 2018 “is sacrosanct to me,” said moderate Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J.

In a new complication, Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said the measure lacked the votes to pass in the Senate, where Republicans hold a precarious 52-48 majority. That left House members angry over being asked to take a politically risky vote for legislation likely to be altered.

Moderates “don’t like the idea of taking a vote in the House that may go nowhere in the Senate,” said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.

Amid the maneuvering, a federal report said more than 12 million people have signed up for coverage this year under the very statute that Republicans want to repeal. That figure underscored the potential political impact of the GOP’s next move.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Heartwarming video shows Medicaid giving hope to Florida’s most vulnerable children

Health care through Medicaid, particularly for Florida’s most vulnerable citizens — children, the elderly and low-income families — is not an abstract. It is a real need, for real people, and without it, can lead to real suffering.

A new video shows how the state’s Medicaid program is keeping one Plant City boy alive. It is not just money for lawmakers to spend arbitrarily; it is care for actual people, often those who need it most.

The video is from the Florida Hospital Association, illustrating just what is at stake when lawmakers proposed drastic cuts in the state’s Medicaid program.

The 90-second clip is one of a series in the FHA’s “Some Cuts Won’t Heal” campaign, which features families and caregivers from across the state who rely on Medicaid to care for loved ones.

Launching statewide Monday, the digital campaign features the story of Lakota Lockhart, a 7-year-old Plant City boy who has received lifesaving services through Medicaid. Lakota was diagnosed with Central Hypoventilation Syndrome, where the boy literally forgets to breathe at night.

In the video, Dr. Daniel Plasencia, medical director of St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital, explains that “almost 90 percent of children” he treats at the clinic are on Medicaid.

Without that secondary Medicaid coverage, Lakota’s mother Krystal says, the family would have faced a tragic situation, with only a minimal 30 days of nursing care; not nearly enough to treat Lakota’s chronic condition.

“Cutting funding to care for sick children, the elderly, and disabled isn’t about numbers — it’s about kids like Lakota,” says the campaign’s website, which points out that Medicaid cuts will lead to a host of problems — reduced access to services, longer emergency room waits and widespread uncompensated care.

In a heartwarming way, “Some Cuts” puts a human face on the consequences of cutbacks in the Medicaid program, leaving Florida children, pregnant women, low-income families, the elderly and the disabled without access to critical health care services.

Lakota’s video, as well as those from other caregivers, patients, families, and advocates, can be seen on cutswontheal.com.

Magic Johnson visits Tallahassee to talk up Medicaid managed care

Magic Johnson visited with Senate Democrats Monday to praise Medicaid managed care programs that are using town hall meetings and church outreach to steer HIV, dental, geriatric, and other health care to poor people in 60 Florida counties.

The programs have served 9,500 people with HIV during the past four years, Johnson said.

Moreover, “our providers and our doctors look like the patients they serve. That’s very important, because they can serve them better, understand their needs,” Johnson said, providing “the best health care they’ve ever received.”

Johnson, who recently rejoined the Los Angeles Lakers as president for basketball operations, later dropped in on Senate President Joe Negron, and was scheduled to meet with Senate Republicans later in the day.

He and Negron talked about health care and baseball — Johnson is a co-owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers; Negron is a notorious Atlanta Braves fan.

Lourdes Rivas, president and CEO of Simply Health Care and Amerigroup Florida, which are administering the managed care program under a contract with the state, said Florida has greatly improved access to dental care — now covering nearly half of its residents, up from a low of 28 percent.

The contract is up for renewal, Rivas said.

Johnson, a “brand ambassador” for the programs, said the importance of dental care cannot be understated. He referred to reports that a child in Washington, D.C., died of a dental abscess.

“We’ve been doing a lot of great things. I just hope that all of you are proud of the work that we’ve been doing. If we are awarded this contract again, we look forward to partnering with all of you and try to do more,” Johnson said.

Caucus members expressed skepticism of GOP plans to block grant Medicaid and cut funding for health care programs, including HIV research.

Sen. Kevin Rader suggested that when Johnson met with Senate Republicans later in the day, he tell them: “Please put it back in.”

Johnson offered no comment on the Republican plans, beyond observing that he has worked with the University of Miami on HIV issues.

There was a lot of picture taking. Lauren Book introduced Johnson to her new twins. Sen. Randolph Bracy produced a basketball for Johnson to sign.

“I told him I wanted to get a game of one-on-one,” said Bracy, who played basketball at the College William & Mary.

“We won’t have enough time today,” Johnson joked.

Pam Bondi touts $165 million recovered by state’s Medicaid fraud unit

Florida has proved to be one of the most effective states in the nation last year for recovering Medicaid fraud money.

A report issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services revealed Florida recovered more than $165 million in otherwise lost funds through fraudulent Medicaid cases during fiscal year 2015-2016, the state’s attorney general said in a statement Thursday.

The report shows Attorney General Pam Bondi’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) is working, according to the Office of Inspector General for Health and Human Services.

“My Medicaid Fraud Control Unit investigators work tirelessly to stop Medicaid fraud and recover stolen funds for taxpayers,” Bondi said in the statement. “This report sends the strong message that we will continue to aggressively pursue anyone trying to defraud Florida’s Medicaid program.”

According to the report, Florida ranked only second in the nation in total funds recovered for the 2015-2016 fiscal year, with New York raking in the most at nearly $229,000,000.

Since taking office in 2011, Bondi’s MFCU has obtained more than half a billion dollars in settlements and judgments in total.

The unit investigates and prosecutes providers that intentionally defraud the state’s Medicaid program through fraudulent billing practices. In addition, the MFCU investigates allegations of patient abuse, neglect and exploitation in facilities receiving payments under the Medicaid program.

Each year OIG of the HHS publishes a report of the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit statistical data from the preceding federal fiscal year.

California and Texas ranked third and fourth, respectively, with California saving more than $136,000,000 and Texas saving more than $128,000,000.

To view HHS OIG’s report, click here.

Rick Scott says ACA replacement is a work in progress

Gov. Rick Scott said Thursday that he thinks Florida would be treated unfairly under the current version of congressional Republicans’ Obamacare repeal bill.

Scott did not tell reporters he opposed the bill after meeting with House Speaker Paul Ryan in Washington, D.C., though he did say the repeal bill needs to be fair for states like Florida, which did not expand Medicaid. He also said the bill needs to give autonomy to run their own Medicaid programs.

States like Florida which didn’t expand can’t get treated unfairly,” he said. He also called the current plan “a work in progress.”

The newly unveiled proposal would allow states that expanded Medicaid to keep their extra federal funds for the next few years until the program phases out in 2020. The bill would also tie Medicaid funding to the number of enrollees in each state.

States that did not expand Medicaid would get an extra $10 billion over the next five years under the bill and would also have spending cuts for safety net hospitals lifted in 2018, 2 years ahead of Medicaid expansion states.

Safety net hospital executives travel to Washington in search of money

Representatives of hospitals that provide a lot of charity care in Florida were headed to Washington Monday to urge federal health care officials and members of Congress to give them more money and freedom to spend it.

Tony Carvalho, president of the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida, said members hope the Trump administration will prove friendlier than former President Obama, who trimmed Washington’s Low Income Pool financing for charity care from $2.2 billion to $608 million during the past three years.

That harmed “hospitals’ ability to care for all residents, not just those that cannot pay for their care. Now is the time to correct that injustice and ensure that Florida receives its fair share of federal funding to help cover the costs of caring for the poor and uninsured,” Carvalho said in a written statement.

Texas gets 500 percent more than Florida, he said, and California gets 20 times more.

“While we appreciate Gov. Rick Scott recommending the continuation of today’s $608 million in LIP supplemental Medicaid funding in his proposed 2017-18 budget, we urge his office to work with the Trump administration to secure at least $1.6 billion,” he said.

Scott’s proposed state budget would save $581 million by trimming Medicaid reimbursements to hospitals, and $298 million in supplemental money for for-profit hospitals that stint on charity and uncompensated Medicaid care.

They’d also like more freedom in how they spend charity dollars.

“Current LIP parameters for funding care for the poor and uninsured are too restrictive. Federal officials need to remove the allocation straight-jacket strapped on the state so Florida can direct that the precious LIP dollars be used to benefit the greatest number of patients in need,” Carvalho said.

“Federal officials need to remove the allocation straight-jacket strapped on the state so Florida can direct that the precious LIP dollars be used to benefit the greatest number of patients in need,” he said.

“Compounding Florida’s unfair charity care funding deficit is Florida’s precariously low Medicaid reimbursement rates. Today, even before the governor’s proposed $1 billion cut in reimbursements for services to Medicaid enrollees, hospitals are paid much less than the basic cost of providing the care.”

Low reimbursement for charity care forces a “hidden tax” on businesses in the form of higher insurance costs, he said. “Each year, Florida’s hospitals provide more than $3 billion in uncompensated and charity care that those with commercial insurance ultimately pay for.”

The alliance comprises teaching, public, and children’s hospitals that spend heavily on uncompensated and charity care.

Along for the Washington trip were Jonathan Ellen, chairman of the alliance board and CEO of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital; Ed Jimenez, vice chairman and CEO of UF Health Shands Hospital; Carlos Migoya, president and CEO Jackson Health System; and Lindy Kennedy executive vice president and CEO of the alliance.

Executives from Halifax Health, Lee Health, Orlando Health, and Tampa General Hospital also were participating.

Federalism message echoed by Florida health subcommittee members

A day after Florida’s House Education Committee voted to send a memorial to Congress seeking fewer strings tied to federal education funding, a health policy panel made the same request for health care funding.

The House Health Innovation Subcommittee on Wednesday approved sending a memorial to Congress asking lawmakers to consider giving Medicaid funding to the states in the form of block grants.

“As you know, Medicaid is supposed to be a partnership. In reality, the federal government is in control,” said state Rep. Frank White, R-Pensacola, who introduced the memorial at the hearing.

“More than at any time in the past, states have the opportunity to have a serious, thoughtful discussion with the federal government about the nature of federal-state partnerships, like Medicaid, and what those successful block grants in Medicaid and other programs might look like,” White said.

White said effective Medicaid block grants would be based on the number of enrollees and adjusted for health risks and income levels. He argued that the states need flexibility to design programs tailored to their specific demographic and geographic needs.

In the public testimony on the memorial, speakers offered a mix of caution and enthusiastic support.

“In the redesign of health care, would you like to be in charge, as the state legislature? Or would you like a bunch of people in Washington to be in charge, dictating terms, creating more requirements, limiting your ability to manage the utilization of your own Medicaid program?” asked U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, a freshman Republican who previously represented the Panhandle in the state House.

Gaetz agreed that there were still details to iron out about how the block grants would work, but cited his previous experience as a state legislator and current experience in Congress as he told the subcommittee members that they were best suited to determining Florida’s needs.

“I can say with clear eyes that Washington screws everything up,” he said.

Sal Nuzzo, vice president of policy for the James Madison Institute, voiced his support for motivating Congress to move in the direction of federalism and allowing solutions for state-based health care access.

“The most efficient and effective way to guarantee access to actual care is the method of moving subsidization down to the state level where it can actually intersect with the specific needs of each state’s health population,” Nuzzo told the subcommittee.

Michael Daniels, executive director of the Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology lobbying group, asked the members to proceed with caution, and to continue including the ultimate stakeholders — Florida patients — in the conversation.

Karen Woodall, policy director for the Florida Center for Fiscal and Economic Policy, argued that in the context of block grants, flexibility equaled an erosion of the protections afforded by federal benefit mandates.

Several Democratic lawmakers offered similar concerns.

The subcommittee approved the memorial on an 8-5 vote along party lines.

Via FloridaWatchdog.org.

VIDEO: Matt Gaetz in Tallahassee to promote Medicaid block grants

Congressman Matt Gaetz was in the Capitol Wednesday to discuss health care reform, including his support for a block grant funding method for Medicaid, the joint state-federal health care program for the poor.

After a structured media availability, the former state representative elected to Congress last year held a more informal gaggle with members of the Capitol Press Corps.

Gaetz, a Fort Walton Beach Republican, served in the Florida House for six years.

Below is a Periscope video of his Q&A in the House media room.

Nursing homes fighting plan to eliminate certificate of need program

The top legislative priority for Florida’s nursing homes this year is to kill a proposal, backed by Gov. Rick Scott, to repeal a requirement that they demonstrate a demand for new beds before they can expand or build new facilities.

SB 676, by Rob Bradley, and CS/HB 7 by Alex Miller, and would eliminate the certificate of need program at the Agency for Health Care Administration for all health care facilities.

Eliminating the requirement for nursing homes “would be extremely disruptive,” Florida Health Care Association chief lobbyist Bob Asztalos told reporters during a briefing Monday.

The association, which represents 82 percent of the skilled nursing facilities in Florida, fears competition from newer, shinier “Taj Mahal” facilities would drive down occupancy rates.

That’s what happened in Texas, where the occupancy rate hit 70 percent after the state scrapped its certificate of occupancy requirement, Asztalos said.

In Indiana, eliminating the requirement led to the construction of “so many buildings that they were looking at taxpayer money to buy buildings to take them off line,” he said.

“We don’t want to see Florida make the same mistakes,” Asztalos said.

Staffing levels would be “watered down,” said Rob Greene, CEO of Palm Garden Healthcare, which operates a network of facilities.

The association would like to see expansion limited to about 3,750 beds through July 2017, targeted to areas where they’re needed.

Free-market advocates, including Scott, argue an open marketplace would lower costs and increase quality.

“The government sets our rates. If there were a true free market, we would set our rates that the state would pay us for our care. But how do you have a free market where they set our rates?” Asztalos said.

The existing system is in the best interests of nursing homes, he conceded, but it also serves the state’s policy of placing patients in home- or community-based care.

“It’s not like nursing home A is going to steal beds from nursing home B. You’re going to look for people with high acuity who are in assisted living facilities, who are eligible for nursing home care or in home- or community-based care.”

“It’s really a bad idea,” said Emmett Reed, executive director of the association.

“I understand the free-market concept. But this is a public-private partnership. This is not a true free-market business we’re in.

He added: “I think that, philosophically, the governor wants to get it all on the table, to have the discussion. At the end of day, I think, he may have a reasonable ear for nursing homes when we discuss it with him.”

In other priorities, the association supports a proposed prospective payment reimbursement system — paying facilities on a per diem basis tied to factors including patient care and quality.

But it would like a three-year phase-in and more incentives to increase room size and build other improvements.

Additionally, representatives of the organization said, the state could save $68.2 million by exempting long-stay nursing home residents from Florida’s managed care system when it is demonstrated they can’t be moved to less intensive care settings.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons