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Study shows Florida could lose more than 22,000 jobs if DACA ends

The Supreme Court will decide if Donald Trump can end the policy.

If the Supreme Court allows worker authorization for Dreamers to cease, Florida could pay a steep price.

That’s according to a new study from FWD.us, which shows some 24,040 jobs could be lost each month if President Donald Trump’s administration is allowed to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Three quarters of those jobs will be concentrated in 12 states, the study said. For Florida, that means a potential loss of 22,330 jobs over two years.

“On top of the devastating moral costs that would result from the Supreme Court ending the DACA program and putting 700,000 young people at risk of deportation and separation from their families, it would force more than 22,000 hardworking Floridians out of our state’s workforce,” said Ted Hutchinson, Florida director for FWD.us.

“Florida’s economy can’t afford to lose out on the jobs, lost revenue, or cover the wasteful costs to businesses to replace these talented individuals. We urge the Court justices to side with young people and families, and reject the Administration’s continued attempts to end this critical program.”

The study ranks Florida fifth in the nation among states that will be hit the hardest economically.

The state is home to some 25,090 DACA recipients. Most of those work, and the study predicts Florida would experience an average 210 jobs lost every business week should their employment eligibility be revoked.

FWD.us is working with some of the DACA recipients now working in Florida to make the case protections should not be ripped away.

FWD.us notes Florida’s record low unemployment of 3% shows there’s little indication other Floridians are available to fill those jobs.

The wrangling at the federal level comes as FWD.us also frets over mandatory E-Verify rules being debated in the Florida Legislature now.

A separate study by FWD.us released last month shows those requirements could cost Florida 253,000 jobs.

Written By

Jacob Ogles has covered politics in Florida since 2000 for regional outlets including SRQ Magazine in Sarasota, The News-Press in Fort Myers and The Daily Commercial in Leesburg. His work has appeared nationally in The Advocate, Wired and other publications. Events like SRQ’s Where The Votes Are workshops made Ogles one of Southwest Florida’s most respected political analysts, and outlets like WWSB ABC 7 and WSRQ Sarasota have featured his insights. He can be reached at jacobogles@hotmail.com.

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