Pam bondi Archives - Florida Politics

Ashley Moody adds a political committee to her Attorney General bid arsenal

Former Hillsborough Circuit Judge Ashley Moody, who filed in the Republican Primary for Attorney General this month, also launched a political committee this month.

The name: “Friends of Ashley Moody.

Moody has certain tailwinds behind her, including backing by current Attorney General Pam Bondi, who basically endorsed Moody even before she entered the race.

Moody has one opponent on the GOP side thus far: Jacksonville state Rep. Jay Fant.

Fant has $79,575 in his campaign account; of that sum, $8,000 came from Fant, and $3,000 came from his political committee, “Pledge This Day,” which raised $9,000 in May.

Contributions mostly came from Northeast Florida. However, a very important northeast Florida Republican won’t do anything to help him: Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry.

We asked an advisor to Curry if the mayor was going to overlook criticisms Fant made of him at a local Republican Party meeting and help Fant out. The answer was short and brutal.

“Not a chance.”

Without Curry’s blessing, it’s going to be difficult for Fant to compete with the resources that will be at Moody’s disposal.

 

Bob Gualtieri, Chris Nocco endorse Ashley Moody for Attorney General

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri and Sheriff Chris Nocco of Pasco County are endorsing former Circuit Court Judge Ashley Moody for Attorney General.

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Attorney General Pam Bondi during my tenure as Sheriff. Her commitment to protecting our state from pill mills, drug traffickers, and those who prey on seniors through identity theft and scams has made us all safer. We need to continue these aggressive, common-sense initiatives and there is no one better suited to do that than Ashley Moody. She is a proven prosecutor and experienced leader in the legal community. She knows what it takes to protect our state and she has my full support,” Gualtieri said in a statement Monday.

Moody responded: “Sheriff Gualtieri is one of the most proactive and engaged Sheriffs in our state. He is constantly taking the fight to those who seek to do us harm and works with neighborhood and community leaders to ensure the safety of those he and his deputies have sworn to protect. He is also a leader in advocating for a stronger and smarter criminal justice system.”

“As sheriff, my top priority is the safety of my community and the brave men and women who risk their lives each and every day to keep our streets safe,” Nocco added. “I’m supporting Ashley Moody for Attorney General because she shares my priorities and has the experience, knowledge, and determination to keep our state safe and support our law enforcement community and its quest to protect Floridians.”

“Sheriff Nocco is one of the most highly respected and trusted Sheriffs in our state,” Moody said. “As the wife of a law enforcement officer I know just how important it is that our men and women in law enforcement have leaders who constantly look out for their safety and best interest.

“Sheriff Nocco has a proven track record of taking the fight to criminals who seek to do us harm and supporting those who keep us safe,” Moody said. “I can’t thank him enough for his support and I look forward to working with him, and all our Sheriffs, to keep Florida safe.”

Moody spent a decade as a circuit judge in Hillsborough County, resigning abruptly in April. After Moody’s resignation, Bondi, a longtime friend, encouraged her to run for attorney general. Jacksonville Republican State Rep. Jay Fant and Democrat Ryan Torrens of Tampa have already entered the race.

Ashley lives with her husband, Justin, a federal law enforcement agent, in Tampa, with their two sons, Brandon and Connor.

Pam Bondi’s net worth rises to $1.7 million, report shows

Attorney General Pam Bondi has reported her latest net worth at nearly $1.7 million, according to her 2016 financial disclosure filed with the Florida Commission on Ethics.

Her net worth now has risen from the $1.4 million reported in 2015 and from the almost $781,000 she reported for 2012, the earliest disclosure still publicly available on the commission’s website.

Her net worth jumped significantly in 2013 after she inherited from the estate of her father, 

Among assets, her disclosure for 2016 shows roughly $540,000 in “household goods and personal effects” and her “personal residence” now valued at $1.06 million. Her home’s value rose from $825,000 in 2015—a 28.5 percent increase.

She also lists a one-third share in a condominium worth $342,000.

Her liabilities consist of two loans from Tampa’s Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union totaling almost $255,000.

Bondi also lists her yearly attorney general’s salary from the state—$128,871.

The latest financial disclosures for Gov. Rick Scott, Agriculture Commissioner and GOP candidate for governor Adam Putnam, and departing Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater are not yet filed, according to the website. Atwater is stepping down June 30 to become chief financial officer for Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. 

Hearing set in lawsuit against Pam Bondi over unregistered charities

A Leon County judge has set a hearing in a lawsuit against Attorney General Pam Bondi that says she forces businesses to pony up millions of dollars to unregistered charities as part of settlements in consumer protection cases.

Circuit Judge Charles Dodson ordered the hearing for July 10 in Tallahassee, court records show.

The plaintiff, Orlando entrepreneur John D. Smith, was investigated on a consumer fraud allegation by Bondi’s office in 2015. He invented Storm Stoppers plastic panels as a “plywood alternative” to protect windows during storms.

He argues that some of the unregistered charities Bondi makes settling parties give money to is her own “Law Enforcement Officer of the Year” award and various “scholarship funds designated by the Attorney General.”

Smith also said Bondi was wrongly directing contributions to her office’s nonprofit, Seniors vs. Crime, which is a “conflict of interest,” the suit says. Two of its directors work for Bondi.

Bondi, through Deputy Solicitor General Jonathan L. Williams, responded that some of the organizations criticized by Smith aren’t “require(d) … to register (with the state) before receiving contributions from governmental entities.”

She further said Seniors vs. Crime “was created in 1989 by then-Attorney General Bob Butterworth (and) since 2002, OAG (Office of Attorney General) employees have consistently served on the organization’s board.

“In keeping with that close historical relationship, OAG and Seniors vs. Crime share a common interest—protecting Florida’s senior citizens against fraud.”

Scott Siverson, Smith’s attorney, also rebutted claims that Smith had settled his case with the Florida Attorney General’s Office. Many companies choose to settle in what’s known as an “assurance of voluntary compliance.”

“Apart from their initial threat letter to Storm Stoppers, the OAG never took any other action, and never sent a letter to Mr. Smith informing him that their investigation was concluded,” he said in a statement.

Since she first assumed office in 2011, Bondi’s office settled enforcement actions with 14 businesses in which they wound up paying more than $5.5 million to 35 unregistered charities, Smith’s suit says.

In a previous statement, Bondi called the legal action “meritless” and “harassment.”

Murder charges for fatal fentanyl dealers: now Florida law

Gov. Rick Scott signed HB 477 on Wednesday, a bill that would subject opioid dealers whose toxic product killed the end user to murder charges.

HB 477  targets fentanyl and similar drugs by adding them to the Schedule 1 classification, along with heroin, MDMA, LSD, and cannabis.

The potential death penalty for traffickers already existed for cocaine, opium, and methadone

This measure, which follows up on a state of emergency declared earlier this year, is designed to combat the opioid overdose crisis, one that is taking lives throughout Florida, and taxing police and rescue budgets throughout the state.

“This legislation provides tools for law enforcement and first responders to save lives. We are committed to helping our communities fight opioid abuse and that’s why I declared a Public Health Emergency to ensure that our first responders have immediate access to lifesaving drugs to respond to overdoses,” Scott said.

The Governor lauded Attorney General Pam Bondi, Senator Greg Steube and Representative Jim Boyd for “hard work on this legislation and dedication to the health and safety of our families.”

Bondi said the legislation was “top priority this session—because it gives law enforcement and prosecutors the tools we need to combat the trafficking of fentanyl and save lives.”

“For too many years, the opioid epidemic has devastated families across the state and this legislation is a major step in our battle against this deadly epidemic,” Sen. Steube added.

“I was proud to sponsor this bill to combat the death and destruction that fentanyl abuse has on communities throughout the state, and I’m grateful to Gov.Scott for signing it into law today. With this legislation and the declaration of a Public Health Emergency, we are taking great strides in our fight to end opioid abuse,” Rep. Boyd asserted.

Law enforcement leaders, via a press release from the Florida Sheriffs’ Association, likewise lauded the legislation as part of a holistic approach to the epidemic wrecking population swaths in their jurisdictions.

“Law enforcement alone cannot stop the loss of lives due to substance abuse,” said FSA President and Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings. “We must continue to be equipped with the necessary resources and laws to reduce the supply and demand of illegal drugs. Signing this bill is one additional tool to help us combat this epidemic.”

“We must also increase our efforts to create robust drug prevention and substance abuse treatment options for those in need,” said FSA Legislative Chair Sheriff Bob Gualtieri. “Our goal is to address these issues and make them our priority so we can protect the community as a whole. This bill puts in perspective the issues at hand that must be controlled and criminalized.”

Personnel note: Kent Perez departing Attorney General’s Office

Kent Perez, chief of staff to Attorney General Pam Bondi and a veteran of the office, Tuesday said he’s accepted an offer to become the State Board of Administration‘s deputy executive director.

Perez

Perez, who’s been with the state off and on since 1978, told FloridaPolitics.com he expects to start the new job by the end of the month.

He’ll report to SBA chief Ash Williams. Perez said he and Williams are still “working out” his precise job responsibilities. The agency acts as the state’s investment manager.

“I’m flattered that anybody thinks this is news,” Perez said.

He’s been described by the Tampa Bay Times as a “steady hand and political survivor,” serving under six different attorneys general. He also holds the title of general counsel to Bondi.

Perez’s name recently was floated as a possible appointed successor to Bondi amid speculations she was joining President Donald Trump‘s administration.

Did Republican state and national leaders mail in their Pulse appearances?

In one of the more biting moments in the 1997 film “Good Will Hunting,” mathematician Gerald Lambeau, played by Stellan Skarsgård, apologizes to his old friend, psychologist Sean Maguire, played by Robin Williams, for having missed the funeral of Sean’s wife.

“I got your card,” Sean snapped, not at all disguising his anger.

Did we just see state and national Republicans mail in [or tweet in] their condolences and best wishes for Orlando’s one-year observation of the Pulse mass-murder that killed 49 and tore out the heart of a community?

Orlando is increasingly becoming a Democratic stronghold, but plenty of Republicans still thrive in Central Florida, and plenty get elected, and the area is worth fighting for. The local GOP contingent was well represented, by Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, several county and city commissioners, several state lawmakers and others. But, except for Democrats U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, and U.S. Reps. Stephanie Murphy, Val Demings and Darren Soto, who all spoke at one event or another event, none of the state and national political leaders made much of an appearance at Orlando’s Pulse activities.

There’s a real chance state and national Republican leaders weren’t asked to come, discouraged to come, or just knew that their appearances would be, at best, awkward. There has been widespread criticism that too many of them just never fully acknowledged the pain in Orlando was both about a terrorist attack and about the biggest hate crime against gays in American history.

And Monday’s commemorations all were intimate, mostly involving only those public figures who had been there with Orlando throughout.

Some Republicans tried to do something.

Gov. Rick Scott was the lone state or national leader who came to Orlando, but it was a stealth appearance, not announced in advance, and apparently without any remarks. He stopped for a private breakfast at the Orlando Police Department headquarters, and then for an unannounced brief visit to the Pulse nightclub Monday morning, essentially a photo-op. He did not attend any of the major events, and he did not let anyone know he was stopping by Pulse, not even Pulse owner Barbara Poma.

Marco Rubio took to the floor of the Senate Monday evening and made an emotional Pulse speech, full of very personal observations, and acknowledgment that, whatever else the tragedy was, it also was an attack on Orlando’s gay community.

“Obviously the attack was personal for the 49 families with stories of their own and of course the countless others who were injured. I know it was personal to the LGBT community in Central Florida,” Rubio said on the Senate floor. “As I said Pulse was a well-known cornerstone of the community, particularly for younger people. And as I said earlier This was deeply personal for Floridians and the people of central Florida, and I’ll get to that in a moment because I’m extraordinarily proud of that community.”

And he and Nelson introduced a resolution Monday in the Senate to commemorate Pulse.

Murphy, Demings, and Soto also introduced a Pulse remembrance resolution in the House of Representatives, and also spoke on the floor Monday. And all three found time to speak in Orlando, to Orlandoans, first.

Unlike Nelson, Murphy, Soto or Demings, Rubio was nowhere to be seen in Orlando during the observations that began at 1 a.m. and ended at midnight Monday.

Others in state and national GOP mailed or tweeted it in, and continued to miss the point that Orlando sees the tragedy both as a terrorist attack AND a hate crime against gays.

President Donald Trump did not come, nor did he send any White House or Cabinet delegates or surrogates to Orlando. He did not make any proclamations, though he did tweet, including a picture montage of the 49 murder victims.

“We will NEVER FORGET the victims who lost their lives one year ago today in the horrific #PulseNightClub shooting. #OrlandoUnitedDay.” Trump announced on Twitter Monday.

Rubio also sent his tweets — three of them.

“One year later, we honor 49 of our fellow Americans of @pulseorlando and continue to pray for their families.” Rubio tweeted, and “The #PulseNightClub tragedy was rooted in a hateful ideology that has no place in our world. #OrlandoStrong,” and The #PulseShooting was an attack on the LGBT community, Florida, America, and our very way of life. #OrlandoUnitedDay”

U.S. Reps. Ron DeSantis, Bill Posey and Daniel Webster, who each have districts that are not quite Orlando but close enough to include Orlando suburbs and many who were deeply affected by Pulse, did not make any Orlando appearances.

DeSantis put out a statement, and Webster mentioned Pulse in a Facebook post. Both focused on terrorism, a true angle to the tragedy, but one that continues to divide along partisan lines, as neither made any mention of the attack being on Orlando gays.

“The massacre at the Pulse nightclub represented the face of evil in the modern world. Fueled by a putrid ideology, the terrorist indiscriminately killed dozens of innocent people, forever devastating their families and loved ones. Orlando rallied in response to the attack in a remarkable fashion. It is incumbent on our society to root out radical Islamic terrorism from within our midst,” DeSantis wrote.

“Today, we remember the 49 innocent lives tragically lost due to a horrific act of terror in Orlando one year ago. Our prayers continue to be with the surviving victims, loved ones and all those affected,” Webster wrote on Facebook.

Scott also signed a proclamation on Friday, declaring Monday as Pulse Remembrance Day, surprising some in Orlando with his clear acknowledgment — lacking in some previous statements — that Orlando’s LGBTQ community had suffered mightily and needed acceptance.

Other Republicans followed the same pattern of DeSantis and Webster, ignoring the LGBTQ hate crime angle.

Attorney General Pam Bondi tweeted, but did not come to Orlando.

“Today we honor those lost in the #Pulse attack & the citizens & first responders who ran toward danger to save lives.” Bondi tweeted.

Agricultural Commissioner and gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam both put out a statement, and tweeted, but did not come to Orlando.

“On the anniversary of the Pulse attack, we pause to remember the 49 victims who were suddenly and senselessly taken, their loved ones who continue to mourn and heal, and the first responders who put themselves in harm’s way for their fellow Floridians without hesitation,” Putnam wrote. “We also remember how Orlando, the Central Florida community and the entire state came together amidst such tragedy. People stood in lines for hours to donate blood, generously gave their time and money to total strangers and worked together to meet the needs of all those impacted. This anniversary is not just a solemn milestone to remember those we tragically lost, but it’s also a reminder of the strength, courage and compassion of the people of Florida.

“My prayers to all family, friends & loved ones of the 49 victims who were suddenly and senselessly taken one year ago today,” Putnam tweeted. And then, “And to the 1st responders in Orlando who put their own lives in danger to help others in need, TY for your strength, courage & compassion.”

All 5 Republican members of Hillsborough Commission are backing Ashley Moody for AG

Former Hillsborough County judge Ashley Moody just kicked off her campaign for Attorney General and is already building support amongst those who know her best – Republicans from her home county.

On Tuesday, Moody announced that all five Republican members of the Hillsborough County Commission – Stacy White, Sandy Murman, Al Higginbotham, Ken Hagan and Victor Crist – are backing her campaign.

“As a native of Hillsborough County it is incredibly humbling to have such overwhelming support from our County Commissioners,” Moody said of the joint endorsement. “This county is a special place for me and my family.  It is where I was born and raised, it is where I practiced law and served on the bench and it is where my husband and I are raising our family.’

“These County Commissioners have spent their time in public service advancing fiscally conservative principles that prioritize spending on local government priorities, including public safety and our Sheriffs Office – giving our men and women in uniform the tools and resources they need to keep us safe and crackdown on crime,” Moody added.

The 42-year-old Moody is competing against Jacksonville state representative Jay Fant in the still very early race to succeed GOP incumbent Pam Bondi in 2018.

Fant raised $80,000 in May, his first month of entering the race.

While the consolidation of Republican elected officials in Hillsborough will help Moody locally, she has already claimed the support of perhaps the biggest Hillsborough Republican in the race from the jump – that being Bondi, who said last week that Moody is her chosen candidate to succeed her next year.

Ashley Moody to hold AG campaign kick-off event on June 29

Ashley Moody will officially kick off her Attorney General campaign with an event in Tampa later this month.

Moody will hold a campaign kickoff at 6 p.m., June 29 at The Floridan Palace in Tampa. The event comes weeks after the former Hillsborough circuit judge threw her hat in the race to replace Attorney General Pam Bondi in 2018.

The 42-year-old was first elected to the 13th Judicial Circuit when she was 31 years old, making her the youngest judge in Florida. She resigned her seat in at the end of April.

Moody, who filed to run for Attorney General on June 1, is the second Republican to jump into the race to replace Bondi, who can’t run for re-election again because of term limits. Jay Fant, a Jacksonville state representative, is also running. Democrat Ryan Torrens is also running.

She has already lined up a big name backer in her race. Earlier this month, Bondi said she planned to support Moody in the Attorney General’s race, saying she doesn’t “think there could be a more qualified candidate for attorney general in the entire state of Florida.”

In bid for Attorney General, Ashley Moody already has one key supporter – Pam Bondi

Even though Ashley Moody has not yet officially announced a bid for Florida attorney general, the former Hillsborough Circuit judge already has one key endorsement – current Attorney General Pam Bondi

Bondi said Moody is her preferred choice to be her successor and will support her when she enters the 2018 race.

“I’ve known her most of her life,” Bondi told the Tampa Bay Times Monday. “I don’t think there could be a more qualified candidate for attorney general in the entire state of Florida. I wholeheartedly support Ashley and I’m proud of her for wanting to sacrifice so much for our state.”

Bondi went Stetson University College of Law with Moody’s mother, Carol. The Attorney General first met the future judge when she was a teenager. They have been close friends ever since.

Moody spent a decade as a circuit judge in Hillsborough for 10 years, before resigning abruptly in April. After Moody’s resignation, Bondi encouraged her to run for attorney general.

Moody filed a campaign for the office last week with the state Division of Elections and is expected to officially announce her bid Tuesday.

Jacksonville Republican State Rep. Jay Fant and Democrat Ryan Torrens of Tampa have already entered the race.

“No one will outwork Ashley Moody in this race,” Bondi told the Times.

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