Jack Latvala – Florida Politics

Blake Dowling: All apologies

Last night, I was watching a Celtics game. Late in the half, during a timeout, there were back-to-back commercials — each a message of apology.

Wells Fargo was very sorry they created millions of fake accounts to cook the books; Facebook is very sorry about, I guess, lots of things.

Wells Fargo’s message was pretty clear, but the FB ad was a bit like a hurricane of messaging.

Bottom line, apologies are everywhere these days.

Or, maybe, are we a nation of apologists? Perhaps we have always been.

Are these nationwide campaigns helpful? Are they even necessary?

While Zuck was testifying to Congress and scandal after scandal was unfolding for his firm, meanwhile the company’s financials were skyrocketing, in fact, their first-quarter earnings for 2018 were up 60 percent over the same time last year.

All situations are unique, and maybe FB is bullet resistant (not bulletproof, mind you. No one is.) Its offering has integrated itself into the fabric of our personal and professional lives, and it is an extremely “sticky” company/offering to simply toss out the window.

Most of us are in professions where apologies are required and necessary. Think about KFC this year. They ran out of chicken. Ummm. Oops to the guy ordering the chicken.

You had ONE job, Daryl. 😊

How did they respond? With a pretty cheeky PR campaign.

How about politics? Apologies are welcome (it would seem) but a “there’s the door” approach appears to be the common end game. Plus, in situations last year involving state Sens. Jeff Clemens and Jack Latvala, we are not talking about creating fake bank accounts (or running out of chicken).

In these cases, more serious issues are at play. In the political world, once trust is broken and alleged bad behavior is exposed, it is much harder to get it back.

City of Tallahassee mayor? Apology.

More apologies in our state.

Joy Reid calls Charlie Crist “Miss Charlie.” Classy. Another apology.

Why are people apologizing so much these days? Doesn’t it seem as if apologies are rampant — money, data, sex (and chicken)?

Perhaps, the world of social media and our press focuses so much on those doing wrong and the apologies that come after.

Just a crazy thought: Maybe we should focus more on those business leaders and companies that are not apologizing for anything?

For example, Gov. Rick Scott’s leadership during recent hurricanes. No apology required. Thank you, sir.

Another is Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, who are fighting the good fight for the people of Puerto Rico. Great job, guys, as 10 percent of this U.S. territory is still without power.

So, if my thoughts in this column have offended you in any way, email me at the address below. Perhaps I will send an apology. (HA!)

As my friend Brad Swanson likes to say, if you aren’t taking any flak, you aren’t on target.

Have a great weekend.

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Blake Dowling is CEO of Aegis Business Technologies. He enjoys sports, IPA’s and can be reached at dowlingb@aegisbiztech.com.

With Facebook page, Becca Tieder inches toward challenging Chris Latvala

Democrat Becca Tieder took another step toward challenging Clearwater Republican state Rep. Chris Latvala in House District 67.

Tieder, a Clearwater native and third-generation Floridian, has set up a Facebook political candidate page — @BeccaforFlorida — slated to “start May 1.”

According to DNS records, the domain name Becca4Florida.com has also been registered since March 28.

As Florida Politics reported earlier, House Victory and incoming Democratic leader Kionne McGhee confirmed the Florida Democratic Party is actively recruiting Teider to face Latvala, who will be seeking a third term in the Clearwater-area HD 67.

“If I run, it’s because I’m the best candidate for the seat. I’m not doing this for me — I have a great life,” Tieder, a mother of two, told reporters. “But if I feel like I can make a difference, I will run, and I will win.”

What did resonate was complaints of Tallahassee’s overreach, which included increased funding for charter schools.

“Charter schools serve a purpose, but not as a replacement for public schools,” she said; it was wrong to “give away so much of what feels like our — the public’s — responsibility.”

Tieder is active in the movement against sexual assault on college campuses. Joined by fellow activist Kelly Addington, Tieder has traveled up to 150 days a year since 2003, speaking about sexual assault awareness, prevention and sexual empowerment. According to her website, the pair has taken their message to more than a half-million students at nearly 400 college campuses.

Previously, Tieder considered a run for Pinellas County School Board in 2020 but said that after attending several board meetings, she felt the current crop of elected officials were “well suited for their jobs.”

Latvala has held the Republican-leaning HD 67 since 2014, after defeating Democrat Steve Sarnoff by six points. In 2016, he defeated Democrat David Vogel by 17 points in the district that went for Republican Donald Trump by around 4 points. Wednesday evening, Latvala is holding a campaign kickoff event in Clearwater, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Island Bay Grill, 20 Island Way.

Lantana Democrat Lori Berman

Lori Berman’s special election victory certified

Lantana Democrat Lori Berman’s special election victory for a Palm Beach County Senate district, which moved her up from the Florida House, was quickly certified Tuesday.

The Elections Canvassing Commission — comprised of Gov. Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis — certified the April 10 election results in which Berman defeated Lake Worth Republican Tami Donnally. Secretary of State Ken Detzner oversaw the brief telephonic meeting in which all three members of the commission participated.

Berman captured 75 percent of the vote for the Democratic-leaning Senate District 31 seat that was vacated in October by Jeff Clemens, a Lake Worth Democrat who stepped down after admitting to an extramarital affair with a lobbyist.

Berman’s Senate term will expire after the 2020 Legislative Session.

Less than 10 percent of the 312,967 registered voters in the district participated in the special general election, according to the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections website.

Berman’s District 90 Palm Beach County House seat will be filled in the November general election.

Berman’s election to the 40-member Senate leaves the upper chamber with one empty chair. The lone vacancy, District 16 in Pinellas and Pasco counties, will be filled in November. Former Sen. Jack Latvala, a Republican from Clearwater, resigned from the seat in December, following a sexual-harassment investigation.

Florida Democrats lining up challenger for Chris Latvala

Clearwater Republican Rep. Chris Latvala could soon have a challenger in his House District 67 re-election campaign

Sources close to House Victory and incoming Democratic leader Kionne McGhee confirmed Tuesday that the party is actively recruiting Becca Teider to run against Latvala in the fall.

Tieder is part of a duo who travel to college campuses to speak about sexual assault awareness, prevention and sexual empowerment.

As a speaker, Tieder has visited more than 400 college campuses, some military installations, and even the White House as part of a roundtable on college sexual assault held by former Vice President Joe Biden.

In an interview with Florida Politics, the Clearwater native said she hasn’t decided whether she will enter the race, but that she’s “definitely giving it some serious consideration.” She said she’ll make the call within the next few weeks.

“If I run, it’s because I’m the best candidate for the seat. I’m not doing this for me – I have a great life,” she said. “But if I feel like I can make a difference, I will run and I will win.”

One of the obstacles remaining for the mother of two is whether being in Tallahassee for long stretches would put too much of a strain on her children, family and business.

As a legislator, it’s possible she’d travel less than she does now – some years she has spent up to 150 days travelling and this week alone she’s already crossed the country to give talks at Penn State University and the University of Southern California.

Running for the state Legislature wasn’t always part of Tieder’s plans. Until recently, she was considering a run for Pinellas County School Board in 2020, but after attending several board meetings she felt like the current crop of elected officials were well suited for their jobs.

What did resonate with her were members’ complaints of overreach from Tallahassee, including a shift toward increased funding for charter schools.

“Charter schools serve a purpose, but not as a replacement for public schools,” she said, adding that she saw it as wrong to “give away so much of what feels like our – the public’s – responsibility.”

Tieder’s possible candidacy also seems to telegraph that Jack Latvala, a Clearwater Republican who recently resigned from the Senate due to allegations of sexual harassment, will be at the forefront of a campaign between her and Chris Latvala, Jack’s son.

Her view of the longtime state Senator has some nuance, but she didn’t deny the topic would be part of her run if she enters the race.

“Jack Latvala has – as a legislator – done some very good things for Pinellas County, but unfortunately his legacy is forever changed,” she said. “Given my background, I always side with the survivors.”

Tieder said she didn’t see District 67’s Republican advantage – the seat voted plus-4 for Donald Trump – as particularly daunting. If anything, she said Trump’s election could be “a good thing, in the long run” if enough Democrats are motivated to turn out in 2018.

“Either that, or the world could implode,” she said.

Latvala has held the District 67 seat for two terms. He won election in 2014 with a 6-point win over Democrat Steve Sarnoff, and in 2016 he defeated Democrat David Vogel by 17 points.

Asked about the prospect of facing a challenger in the 2018 cycle, Latvala issued the following statement:

“It is a great honor to serve House District 67. Pinellas County has a long history of independent thinking Republicans. I am a proud Conservative who is an independent thinker and votes in line with the district on things like guns, environmental issues, and matters of equality. I am taking this election cycle very seriously and since session has ended my team has knocked on over 3,000 doors and we have ramped up our fundraising efforts. We will not be outworked.”

Latvala has not yet posted his March campaign finance report, though through the end of February he had raised $43,250 for his re-election campaign and had about $19,000 on hand.

Florida Democrats look to expand number of state Senate seats in play

It’s been nearly 25 years since a Democrat presided over the Florida Senate, but if the plans of party leaders and operatives come together, the president’s gavel could be theirs as soon as November.

The Florida Democratic Party and the Florida Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee, the recently-established campaign arm of the Senate Democrats, are aggressively working to reshape the map of seats in play this election cycle.

According to multiple sources, including several Democratic state senators, as well as senior staff at the FDP and the FDLCC, the party is:

— Hoping to persuade former state Rep. Amanda Murphy to run for the open seat in Senate District 16, once held by Clearwater Republican Jack Latvala, who resigned in the wake of a sexual harassment scandal. Currently, former state Rep. Ed Hooper is running for the Pinellas-based district against a long-shot Democratic opponent.

— Actively encouraging outgoing state Rep. Janet Cruz to enter the race for SD 18, where she would go up against Republican incumbent Dana Young.

— Expecting trial lawyer Carrie Pilon to challenge incumbent Sen. Jeff Brandes in SD 24, a seat that’s historically flipped back and forth between the parties.

— Investing a higher level of resources than first expected in the campaigns of Kayser Enneking and Bob Doyel, two first-time candidates challenging Republican incumbents Keith Perry and Kelli Stargel, respectively.

— Counting on Alex Penelas, the former mayor of Miami-Dade County, to step up and run for SD 36, where Republican Rene Garcia is term-limited. State Rep. Manny Diaz has already declared for the seat and, in fact, just raised more than $50,000 at his first fundraiser.

Currently, the Florida Senate has 23 Republicans and 15 Democrats, although Lori Berman‘s special election victory is a foregone conclusion, so it’s really 23-16.

That means Republicans hold a seven-seat advantage heading into the 2018 cycle. If the Democrats protect all of their incumbents (currently none are engaged in particularly competitive re-elections) and win five of the seven targets listed above — an enormous, almost herculean task — Sen. Audrey Gibson of Jacksonville will serve as president of the Senate in 2018-20.

Of course, it’s easy to draw targets on a map. Having candidates actually file for the seats and win their races are other matters altogether.

There’s also the issue of money.

Florida Democrats have been traditionally hamstrung by a decided lack of financial resources, while their Republican counterparts in the Senate are flush with campaign cash, both in the Florida Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee’s fund and in the individual accounts of several Senators.

Republicans have other advantages at their disposal. First of all, most are incumbents and can use the power of their offices to reach voters. And despite what some in the traditional media might have you believe, Florida’s Republican lawmakers are actually held in good standing by most voters, with 52 percent of Floridians giving them the thumbs-upaccording to a recent poll from the University of North Florida.

There’s also the reality that most of the Republicans being targeted by the Democrats are off to big head-starts over their prospective Democratic challengers.

“We have excellent candidates who have strong support from their communities and have the resources and on-the-ground teams needed to win,” said Senate President-designate Bill Galvano, who leads his party’s campaign efforts. “The Democrats can focus on recruiting candidates. We are focusing on preparing our already-set slate of candidates for victory.”

Young has banked away nearly a million dollars for her re-election. Brandes has a large, near-permanent campaign staff that really hasn’t stopped working since he was first elected in 2010. Hooper has decades of experience representing Pinellas voters, whereas Murphy would be a new face to many SD 16 constituents. There isn’t a weekend when Diaz isn’t walking door-to-door in this district (Don’t believe me? Just check his Twitter account).

Despite these and other disadvantages, the Democrats are taking the first steps of putting the pieces on the chessboard.

Murphy confirms that interest in her challenging Hooper is spiking. She said her phone was “blowing up” Tuesday as word of her prospective candidacy spread. While she acknowledges that “in today’s climate it would be crazy not to think about running for office,” she also is concerned about what a return to public life might do to her professional career: “I have clients, a team and regulations that demand my time.”

Florida Politics reported Tuesday night that Cruz, currently running for the Hillsborough County Commission, has spoken with Senate Democratic leadership and party donors about challenging Young. Several sources say she has contacted Young’s current Democratic challenger Bob Buesing to discuss clearing the field for her.

Florida Politics recently acquired the internal working documents of the nascent campaign of Pilon, who could launch her campaign as soon as next week.

Penelas, last in office 14 years ago, confirmed Wednesday morning that he is considering a run and that he will likely make a decision next week. A lot depends on what his family — Penelas has a young daughter — thinks of the decision, he says.

With a potential abundance of riches, at least in terms of candidates, the question remains whether the Democrats will have the money to play in as many as seven or eight competitive seats.

One potential source of the kind of money needed to compete in all of these seats is national money, like that from former Attorney General Eric Holder‘s National Democratic Redistricting Committee. It’s attracted to the possibility of flipping chambers, not just winning seats.

“If there was ever a cycle when Democrats could make huge gains in a chamber, including possible flipping one, it’s this year, and it’s in the Florida Senate,” said Christian Ulvert, a prominent Democratic political consultant.

Tampa Bay Times editorial board disgustingly misframes the Jack Latvala scandal

Up until the moment a special master’s report found credible evidence of Jack Latvala‘s sexual misconduct, I was a defender of the Republican state Senator’s right to due process and, to some extent, an opportunity to confront his accusers.

But after former Judge Ronald Swanson issued a report that Latvala inappropriately touched a top Senate aide and may have broken the law by offering a witness in the case his support for legislation in exchange for sex acts, there was no way anyone could still stand by Latvala’s side, especially since he kept many of those close to him in the dark about the full extent of his legal vulnerabilities.

Yet, apparently, there are still a few people not related to Latvala taking up his cause, namely the editorial board of the Tampa Bay Times.

In an editorial lamenting the hits, errors and misses of the 2018 Legislative Session, Tim Nickens and Co. rightly criticize lawmakers for failing to deliver on reforming sexual harassment laws and policies.

Yet, inexplicably, if not mind-bogglingly, the editorial board writes that “the rhetoric from many lawmakers about changing a toxic work environment in the state Capitol appears to have been cover for ousting a moderate Republican who made too many enemies.”

I don’t write this lightly, but are you f*cking kidding me?

Is the Times really suggesting that Richard Corcoran, Lizbeth Benacquisto, Rob Bradley, Matt Caldwell and others spoke out loudly about “the toxic work environment in the state Capitol” as a ploy to sideline Latvala?

Wasn’t it rather that they, like Latvala’s attorney Steve Andrews, almost threw up when they learned about the extent of Latvala’ serial abuse?

A former lobbyist whose name was redacted in the released copy of Swanson’s report said Latvala would touch her inappropriately, including touching the outside of her bra and panties, every time they were alone in his office.

She said he “intimated to her on multiple occasions, that if she engaged in sexual acts or allowed him to touch her body in a sexual manner he would support legislative items for which she was lobbying,” Swanson wrote. That included explicit text messages sent to the woman.

But if you go by the Tampa Bay Times editorial board, Latvala’s problem was not forcing a lobbyist to engage in a quid pro quo for sexual favors, it’s that he was a “moderate” who “made too many enemies.”

Alexandra Glorioso, one of the POLITICO Florida journalists who first reported about Latvala’s pattern of sexual harassment, took to Twitter Sunday to comment about the Times editorial board’s position. (I took to Twitter Friday night to criticize the editorial as soon as I read it).

Among the smart points Glorioso makes:

— It’s inexplicable that the Times editorial board can criticize the Legislature for failing to take sexual harassment seriously, yet criticize some lawmakers for investigating “its hometown Senator.”

— The Times editorial board “continues to refer to Jack Latvala as a ‘moderate Republican who made too many enemies’ and not a former Senator who resigned in disgrace after two independent investigators concluded he likely sexually assaulted and harassed women.”

This is an interesting point because on the same weekend this editorial ran, the Times published a story about former U.S. Rep. Mark Foley, whom it describes as “disgraced” even though his sins were, arguably, not as consequential as Latvala’s.

If you read between the lines of this editorial and the Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald’s coverage of L’Affaire Latvala writ large, it’s that – darn it – Florida would have been a lot better off if Latvala had been around to stick up to Corcoran’s House, etc., on the hometown issues the Times feels passionately about (consolidation of the USF system, for example).

Think of it as some sort of victim shaming in which the few lawmakers who spoke out (early) against Latvala are now being editorialized against for having done so.

And one final note: As Glorioso notes, editorials of the Tampa Bay Times are unsigned and “represent the institutional opinion of the newspaper.”

Accordingly, this editorial brings shame to the entire institution.

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Material from the Associated Press was used in this post.

‘It was time for a sabbatical’: Scandals drive Brian Pitts away

After years of being a persistent—sometimes annoying—presence in committee rooms across the Capitol, only one thing was able to make Tallahassee’s best-known gadfly hang up his corduroy jacket: a snowball of scandals.

“Latvala, Clemens, Artiles—all this happened in one year. In one year! No, that is not acceptable and it was too much. It was time for a sabbatical,” said Brian Pitts, a self-described “civil activist” for Justice 2 Jesus.

Former Sen. Frank Artiles stepped down after using the n-word to refer to one of his colleagues in an alcohol-fueled night out in downtown Tallahassee.

Ousted Sens. Jack Latvala and Jeff Clemens resigned late last year after being accused of having extra-marital affairs with women in their political orbit. Latvala is currently under criminal investigation on accusations that he may have traded votes for sex.

“Latvala was an old fool trying to play with the young bucks as they do,” Pitts said. “Instead of using that institutional knowledge, he goes and acts like the young bucks, and he got caught.”

But Pitts said cases of misconduct began to take a toll on him early last year, before the sex scandals.

First was state Rep. Cary Pigman, who was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol. Then came former state Rep. Daisy Baez, who resigned for violating residency rules, and later what he calls an “abuse of leadership” by House Speaker Richard Corcoran.

The last drop, though, was Sen. Oscar Braynon, he said.

The Miami Democrat was sponsoring his claims bill and after Braynon apologized for having a relationship with Sen. Anitere Flores that “evolved to a level [they] deeply regret,” he considered his bill tainted. Both senators are married.

“The Braynon and Flores affair, that was it,” Pitts said. “I gave the Legislature the opportunity to do without Mr. Gadfly or Mr. Preacher.”

That’s why Pitts said he vanished this Session. It wasn’t an illness. Or money issues, he assures. It was the pervasive misconduct that “came short of breaking the law” that pushed him out.

If he would’ve stayed, he didn’t know if he would be able to conduct himself appropriately in committee.

“I would have had to be dealing with them publicly in between their bills to say, ‘y’all got so many issues and are not in the position to deal with Floridians right now,’ and that would have been disrespectful,” the St. Petersburg resident said.

In his absence, the Capitol was stripped from his classic phrases that include “if the bill is too long, you know there’s somethin’ wrong,” “Jesus wouldn’t agree with this,” or “I’m telling you right now, before you shoot yourself in the foot.”

There were also no sightings of Pitts doing research on the lone computer in the corner of the Capitol’s fifth floor, diligently taking notes.

In place of his absence, he left a Twitter rant in all caps—as is his style—as a message ahead of the 2018 legislative session start. And once gone, another person took over his gadfly role: Greg Pound.

Pound, like Pitts, is a man who uniquely testifies on many topics and in many committees. But Pitts is more tame at the podium than Pound, something the Justice 2 Jesus activist says he is trying to teach him how to do.

“I tell him, ‘you still have to have respect for them’ and I say, ‘you are dealing with issues on the bill, this is not a soap box,’” Pitts said. “But he gets whacked out because he doesn’t follow the process.”

One classic example was when Pound marched to the podium and name-dropped an InfoWars article citing Parkland shooting victims as actors. This was said during the first Senate committee hearing on the controversial gun and school safety measure that was crafted in the wake of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre where 17 were killed and many others were injured.

His testimony was heard in a room packed with opponents of the bill, including Parkland student survivors and parents who lost their children in the school shooting.

“He gets too emotional, he is a class of his own,” Pitts said.

Whether Pitts will be back next session is unclear, but regardless of what happens, he said he is still keeping an eye on what goes on in Tallahassee. His job is to fight for “whatever is right for Floridians.”

“I continue to watch because I am not done with it. I have to watch because I need to know what is going up there because I need to know how it affect the locals,” Pitts said.

Jack Latvala officially out of Governor’s race

Disgraced former Sen. Jack Latvala has withdrawn his bid for the Governor’s Mansion.

The Clearwater Republican sent a formal termination of his gubernatorial campaign Friday to Secretary of State Ken Detzner. The Florida Division of Elections website indicates that Latvala’s campaign is no longer active.

The move comes a little more than two months after he formally resigned his seat in the Legislature, following an investigation that found probable cause that Latvala sexually harassed women in the workplace and may have engaged in quid pro quo activity, trading powerful votes for sexual favors from female lobbyists.

Under Florida law, Latvala has 90 days to zero out his account and can no longer accept campaign contributions, effective immediately.

Florida Politics reported in February that Latvala had begun returning campaign contributions. It was reported that the prorated refunds would be dealt back to donors at approximately one-half of the original amount.

Latvala’s campaign finance reports are not yet updated to reflect February refunds. In January, the account returned 12 — $1,500 refunds.

While Latvala must close out his campaign account, he won’t have to do the same for his affiliated political action committees, which can continue to be active despite the lack of an ongoing campaign.

The former budget chief’s largest PAC, Florida Leadership Committee, still has $3.9 million banked.

After Parkland, Bernie Fensterwald determined to win state Senate race

After the Parkland mass shooting two weeks ago, Bernie Fensterwald is more determined than ever to win in Senate District 16.

As proof, the Dunedin Democrat is putting $25,000 of his own money into the campaign.

“I’m 100 percent committed to this race, and I’m willing to prove it,” Fensterwald announced Friday. “The tragedy in Parkland only strengthened my conviction towards winning this race … I’ve been blessed in my life, and I want to commit myself to public service, but I won’t win unless I talk to as many voters as possible.”

In 2016, Fensterwald ran in House District 65 in 2016 and lost to Republican Chris Sprowls. Some criticized him for only spending $35,000 in the race when his personal finances show he is worth $19.8 million.

But the northern Virginia native told Florida Politics in January that his money is tied up in real estate. “The mere fact that I have in my case $19 million doesn’t mean that there’s the liquidity to that kind of thing. Unfortunately, that’s the way it was taken.”

Unfortunately for Fensterwald, he seems to be running against Pinellas County Republicans who don’t have a problem fundraising.

Sprowls raised $472,000 in the HD 65 race two years ago, and the top Republican in the SD 16 race, former state Rep. Ed Hooper, has raised more than $297,000 nearly eight months before the general election.

Before announcing his self-contribution, Fensterwald raised only a little more than $13,000 for the race. But the financial discrepancy isn’t fazing him.

“I ran in 2016, and I found that the best way to get out to voters is door to door. Starting the first full week in March, I and my supporters will begin going door to door,” he said Friday. “And when I spoke to voters, the biggest thing they connected to politics was corruption.

“The money I’m putting into this campaign will help launch our efforts to speak to voters, and I’m confident that as more people hear our message of bringing integrity to Tallahassee, they’ll support our campaign.”

Now, a third candidate entered the race, with Republican Leo Karruli joining earlier this week.

Karruli, 50, owns Leo’s Italian Grill on U.S. 19 in Palm Harbor.

SD 16 encompasses Clearwater, Dunedin, Safety Harbor, Palm Harbor, New Port Richey and Oldsmar. It had no representation in this year’s Legislative Session after incumbent Jack Latvala resigned in December after allegations of sexual harassment.

Restaurateur Leo Karruli files to run for Jack Latvala’s Senate seat

Palm Harbor resident Leo Karruli has entered the race for state Senate District 16, the seat recently vacated by embattled Sen. Jack Latvala.

Karruli, 50, owns Leo’s Italian Grill on U.S. 19 in Palm Harbor. He is a Queens, New York native who moved to Pinellas County in 1991.

In a brief phone interview with Florida Politics, Karruli said he knows the Pinellas/Pasco County district very well, having previously run restaurants in Tarpon Springs, Dunedin, Oldsmar and Island Estates.

A Republican, Karruli said the idea for running for office came after Latvala resigned in December over allegations of sexual harassment.

SD 16 constituents have had no Senate representation at all during the nine-week legislative Session scheduled to end March 9.

“I’m trying to do something good for the community and District 16,” Karruli said. “I know my district very well, and people know me. I worked hard, seven days a week, so now I want to give something back.”

Having only officially filed earlier in the week, Karruli begged off answering any questions about his political platform, saying that he needs time to put his positions up on his website, which he promises will be live soon.

Back in 2012, Karruli and Leo’s Italian Grill made national news, but not in a fashion he wants to be remembered.

That’s when a woman named Wan St. John found a used bandage in her chicken and rice soup at Leo’s. Based on his attorney’s advice, Karruli did not discuss the incident.

Former Clearwater state legislator Ed Hooper is already in the race, raising nearly $300,000 for his campaign with less than six months to go before the Aug. 28 primary.

Hooper’s fundraising prowess doesn’t worry Karruli: “The money doesn’t mean anything. I’m running to give something back to the people.”

Karruli has a wife and three children, one of whom attends the University of Tampa.

At the moment, Bernie Fensterwald is the lone Democrat in the race.

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