Connect with us
Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at Ida Baker High School in Cape Coral.

Headlines

Ron DeSantis orders end to Common Core, development of new state standards

He ordered the Education Commissioner to build guidelines.

Gov. Ron DeSantis wants an end to Common Core in Florida.

The Republican governor, appearing at a Cape Coral press conference on Thursday, said Florida will eliminate all vestiges of Common Core over the balance of the year.

He issued an executive order directing Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran to work on a new set of education standards instead.

“This is not going to be something dictated by the federal government,” DeSantis said. “It’s going to be something that will spring up from communities here in Florida.”

Florida Education Association President Fedrick Ingram released a statement later Thursday, saying he was “encouraged” by DeSantis’ “plan to bring teachers and parents to the table as they go about reshaping Florida’s standards.”

“We’re also pleased to hear that the administration will look at streamlining testing,” he said. “Parents and our members cite time spent on testing — as versus on genuine teaching and learning — as one of their top concerns. If all stakeholders are heard, we have confidence that this effort can improve public education in Florida.

“We’re also pleased to hear that the administration will look at streamlining testing. Parents and our members cite time spent on testing — as versus on genuine teaching and learning — as one of their top concerns. If all stakeholders are heard, we have confidence that this effort can improve public education in Florida.”

The Common Core national standards have been controversial for years, and in 2014 Florida rebranded its own guidelines as the Sunshine State Standards, but they continue to be derived from Common Core.

Corcoran, a former House Speaker, said the state for years was “stuck with Common Core.”

“It all needs to be looked at, all needs to be scrutinized,” he said. “How do we write the best, No. 1 standards in the United States of America?”

But he said the move won’t necessarily put an end to testing in Florida schools. He does want standards “more geared to knowledge than teaching to the tests.”

How this will work in practicality, though, remains to be seen.

DeSantis stressed a desire for more civics education in school and related concerns from parents about math curricula that challenge parents today.

But right now, public schools use textbooks approved by the Department of Education, with many books built around the nationally-adopted Common Core standards.

DeSantis fielded a question about textbooks, and said districts won’t be free to buy “any books you choose.”

He said any state standards must still be rigorous. He wants an improvement in Florida’s literacy rates.

He also said he does not want any textbooks that include modern partisan messages, a complaint among some anti-Common Core groups who believe federal standards indoctrinate children with left-wing messaging.

DeSantis said he recognized new standards may also prove controversial, but said Florida teachers and parents will have a direct hand in forming them.

“Even if people don’t agree with everything we are doing,” he said, “at least they will feel they were listened to.”

He expects new standards to be ready for the Florida Legislature to consider in the 2020 Legislative Session.

Written By

Jacob Ogles has covered politics in Florida since 2000 for regional outlets including SRQ Magazine in Sarasota, The News-Press in Fort Myers and The Daily Commercial in Leesburg. His work has appeared nationally in The Advocate, Wired and other publications. Events like SRQ’s Where The Votes Are workshops made Ogles one of Southwest Florida’s most respected political analysts, and outlets like WWSB ABC 7 and WSRQ Sarasota have featured his insights. He can be reached at jacobogles@hotmail.com.

Ron DeSantis pulls back nearly 170 Rick Scott appointments

Headlines

Nikki Fried may soon target stores selling CBD oil

Headlines

Lenny Curry defends using uniformed cops in political ads

Jax

Facepalm Facepalm

Alimony reform group hits new low with derogatory Facebook post

Emails & Opinions

Sign up for Sunburn

Receive our team's agenda-setting morning read of what's hot in Florida politics. Delivered straight to your inbox Monday through Friday.

Florida Politics is a statewide, new media platform covering campaigns, elections, government, policy, and lobbying in Florida. This platform and all of its content are owned by Extensive Enterprises Media.

Publisher: Peter Schorsch

Contributors & reporters: Phil Ammann, Jim Rosica, A.G. Gancarski, Joe Henderson, Janelle Irwin, Dan McAuliffe, Michael Moline, Jacob Ogles, Scott Powers, Bob Sparks, Andrew Wilson.
Email: Peter@FloridaPolitics.com
Phone: (727) 642-3162
Address: 204 37th Avenue North #182
St. Petersburg, Florida 33704

Connect
Sign up for Sunburn

Receive our team's agenda-setting morning read of what's hot in Florida politics. Delivered straight to your inbox Monday through Friday.