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Medical marijuana grower wants in on challenge to pot law

A medical marijuana nursery is asking a Tallahassee judge to allow it to step in on a case over the state’s new law governing the drug.

Canadian-based DFMMJ Investments, which inked a deal to take over operations of Chestnut Hill Tree Farm, filed a “motion to intervene” earlier this week with Circuit Judge Karen Gievers.

Sarasota’s TropiFlora is asking the courts to delay the issuance of one of 10 “medical marijuana treatment center” (MMTC) licenses. The nursery has said the department “wrongfully refused” to consider its license application.

When the state’s Office of Medical Marijuana Use in the Department of Health approves the transfer of Chestnut Hill’s growing and operating license to DFMMJ, it will then “take over full ownership,” its filing explains.

DFMMJ is partly owned by Aphria, a Canadian “producer of medical cannabis products,” according to its website.

The company, represented by Tallahassee’s Lockwood Law Firm, is concerned that “any proposed stay, however limited, may interfere with the pending transfer” of the license.

Dockets show Gievers has not yet acted on the motion or the requested stay.

Tropiflora’s attorney, Brian O. Finnerty of Tallahassee, said in an email that “entities such as TropiFlora, that previously applied for but were denied a medical marijuana license, take precedence over new entities that are applying for a MMTC license for the first time.”

Further, he said it’s clear “that the Department of Health has not taken any steps to effectuate the new law as it relates to implementing an application process for the new MMTC licenses. (That) further supports the fact that TropiFlora’s request for a stay of only one MMTC license can in no way act to delay enforcement of part of the new implementing law.”

The new state law grandfathers in seven existing providers, renames them “medical marijuana treatment centers” (MMTCs) and requires the Department of Health to license 10 new providers by October. The bill also allows four new MMTCs for every increase of 100,000 patients prescribed marijuana.

It limits the number of retail locations each MMTC can open to 25 across the state, and divides that cap by region. As the patient count goes up, five more locations can be opened per provider for every new 100,000 patients in the state’s Medical Marijuana Use Registry. The limits expire in 2020.

In late 2015, Tropiflora was one of the first three nurseries to move against the state over the licensing of growers of medical marijuana. San Felasco Nurseries of Gainesville and Perkins Nursery of LaBelle also filed protests.

At that time, only five licenses were awarded to grow medicinal pot, to Chestnut Hill  for the state’s northeast region, Hackney Nursery Co. (northwest region),  Knox Nursery (central), Alpha Foliage (southwest), and Costa Nursery Farms (southeast).

TropiFlora objected because four of the five licenses went to nurseries that also sat on the department’s “negotiated rulemaking” committee.

In 2014, lawmakers passed and Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a measure legalizing low-THC, or “non-euphoric,” marijuana to help children with severe seizures and muscle spasms. THC is the chemical that causes the high from pot.

A three-member panel of state officials in DOH was tasked with selecting five approved pot providers out of 28 nurseries that turned in applications.

Since then, state voters approved a constitutional amendment on medicinal cannabis last year. Lawmakers approved and Scott also signed an implementing bill, passed during a recent Special Session. It gives guidance and instructions to state agencies on how to enforce state law.

Jacksonville’s first medical marijuana dispensary represents policy progress

Wednesday morning saw Jacksonville open its first medical marijuana dispensary, as Trulieve’s storefront on Beach Boulevard opened for business.

For those following the medical marijuana debate in the city as recently as two years ago, Trulieve’s facility represents real progress, especially in contrast to other cities across the state still wrestling with zoning and other perceived impacts of these facilities.

Back in 2015, when “Charlotte’s Web” — the low-THC form of marijuana, also called “Hippie’s Disappointment” —  was a controversy, Jacksonville wrestled with those very issues. Early June saw an emergency 180-day moratorium from the City Council on the growing, processing and dispensing of “low THC marijuana, a/k/a medical marijuana.”

After public outcry, the moratorium was repealed at the second meeting in June.

A second moratorium was passed soon enough. Then the Planning Commission and the Land Use & Zoning committee worked out some useful rules for the high-CBD/low-THC marijuana … rules that exist today, even as the definition of medical marijuana has become more liberalized after the passage of Amendment 2 in 2016.

Ordinance limits dispensaries to one per city planning district, with a minimum of a mile between them, permissible in non-residential zoning areas. Rules for cultivation were also established at that point.

The difference between 2015 and 2017 was vividly illustrated Wednesday, when Trulieve opened its eighth Florida dispensary. This, said Victoria Walker, who handles community relations for the company, put a storefront within a two hour drive of everyone in Florida.

And in Jacksonville, where the company already has hundreds of patients, this is a gateway to increased access for qualified patients, Walker said, already enjoying what she calls the “largest product line” in the state of capsules, oils, vaporizer kits, and topical creams.

Essentially, everything but smokable marijuana.

Walker told us that the company’s goal was to “develop products using the whole plant,” but the company will “operate under whatever the law says.”

Walker also touched on the process in Jacksonville, which she said was a “little bit of a long process” in terms of permitting.

However, it’s a process that is now complete for the company locally — which can’t be said elsewhere.

“A lot of counties are trying to figure out the rules,” Walker said, and Trulieve has met with them.

Her thinking is that as the Trulieve model expands, residual resistance to cannabis use for therapeutic reasons will abate.

“Perception is reality,” Walker said.

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For those who remember the Jacksonville debate of 2015, there was much worry about potential decline in property values and community mores related to these dispensaries.

However, the Trulieve facility — freshly renovated, clean, accessible — is light years ahead of most of the rundown commercial properties near it, an indication that commercial cannabis, at least under the dispensary model, doesn’t necessarily have to lead to the kinds of excesses prohibitionists decry in states with full legalization.

Before the doors opened, patients were discussing the therapeutic effects of cannabis, with a thirty year old indie rock kid talking about the benefits of cannabis with a man twice his age in the queue to enter the store.

Meanwhile, there were those who had their own testimonials to the healing power of cannabis, and none was more powerful than that of 36-year-old Rosemary McKinley, a ballroom dance competitor who has been on high-THC cannabis concentrate since 2014.

McKinley’s days once were spent in an opiate haze, a pharmacological hell of Vicodin, muscle relaxers, and fentanyl.

Those days are over, she said. Since she started therapeutic cannabis, she has gained 15 pounds, and the spasms and headaches, as well as the fatigue and nausea, brought on by a tumor have become bad memories rather than recurrent impacts.

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With the power of cannabis becoming a less esoteric proposition over time, the future of cannabis is bright, said Donavan Carr, the President of NEFL NORML

“Everything takes time,” Carr said, but “if you look at other states, you get an idea of where we can go.”

Could outright legalization happen?

Carr sounded confident.

“It’s just a matter of time,” he said.

Drug Free America calls John Morgan lawsuit ‘disappointing’

John Morgan’s lawsuit against the state for not allowing medical marijuana to be smoked is “disappointing,” but “not surprising,” said the head of the Drug Free America Foundation on Thursday.

Morgan, the Orlando-based attorney and entrepreneur, backed the medical marijuana constitutional amendment that was OK’d by 71 percent of voters last year on the statewide ballot. He filed suit earlier on Thursday.

“It is obvious that the goal of the Legislature, which puts the health and safety of all Floridians first, is in clear conflict with his plans to profit from the sale of marijuana in the state,” said Calvina Fay, the foundation’s executive director, in a statement.

Morgan previously has “acknowledged a business plan to acquire an existing grower,” but avoided questions about details.

On Thursday, he sidestepped another question about his business interests in medical marijuana, saying he “wake(s) up every day in a 100-percent effort to make money, and lots of it … I’m never going to apologize for that.”

Fay said Gov. Rick Scott and lawmakers “took the responsible approach in implementing” the state’s new constitutional amendment on medical marijuana. Their legislation (SB 8-A) allows vaping and edibles, but not smoking.

“Florida (is) setting a standard that can be followed by other states seeking to make their medical marijuana programs safer and more responsible,” she added.

“While not perfect, the legislation succeeded in finding a balance that protects the public health and safety of all Floridians while allowing the legal access to marijuana that was approved by voters.”

The St. Petersburg-based foundation was founded in 1995 by former U.S. Ambassador Mel Sembler and wife Betty.

It opposes what it calls “so-called medical marijuana,” saying in part in an online position paper, “Since marijuana is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is no way to determine proper dosage and potential side-effects with other medications.”

John Morgan plays hero to the ’71 percenters’

“Compassionate capitalist” John Morgan came to Tallahassee Thursday morning, holding court for the cameras soon after he sued the state over not allowing medical marijuana to be smoked.

Pay no attention to the fact that Morgan had electronically filed his lawsuit an hour before: It was about speaking to and “for the people.”

“Today is a day that should not have been necessary,” he said outside the Leon County Courthouse. “The people of Florida knew exactly what they were voting on … the vast majority, if not 100 percent, knew that smoke was included.”

Morgan, the Orlando-based attorney and entrepreneur, backed the medical marijuana constitutional amendment that was OK’d by 71 percent of voters last year on the statewide ballot.

“I’m right, and 71 percent of the people of Florida know I’m right,” he said. He also plans to add more marijuana-using patients as plaintiffs, including people suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Lawmakers recently approved and Gov. Rick Scott signed into law an implementing bill (SB 8-A) for the amendment that does not allow medicinal marijuana to be smoked.

House Republican Leader Ray Rodrigues, who sponsored the implementing bill during both the Regular Session and Special Session, has said “we don’t believe you smoke medicine.” Edibles and “vaping” are permitted, however.

““We believe that smoking causes as much harm as the benefits, particularly when we’re offering vaping, which provides all of the benefits and none of the harm,” he said last month.

Morgan slammed the Estero state representative, a budget manager at Florida Gulf Coast University, calling him a “bean counter.”

“Do the Ray Rodrigueses of the world know better than doctors?” Morgan said, shooing gnats from his face in Tallahassee’s 86-degree morning heat.

He also mentioned a conversation he had last year with a county sheriff, who was concerned about medicinal cannabis users lighting up in coffee shops.

“I’m like, ‘Dude, you can’t smoke cigarettes in Starbucks (as it is). What are you talking about?’ ” Morgan said.

He was on shakier footing when reporters asked why his amendment didn’t make clear that it contemplated allowing the smoking of medical marijuana. Morgan explained he included such language in an “intent statement,” but not in the text of the amendment.

The amendment says “(n)othing in this section shall require any accommodation of any on-site medical use of marijuana in any correctional institution or detention facility or place of education or employment, or of smoking medical marijuana in any public place.”

He analogized the situation to a pool sign that says, “No swimming without lifeguard on duty.” It’s implied that when there’s a lifeguard around, swimming is allowed, he said.

Right, but why not make it crystal clear? he was asked.

“It speaks for itself,” he said. “Now, if you can’t figure it out, I can’t help that.”

The full press availability can be viewed in a Periscope clip below:

John Morgan’s suit says smoking pot actually good for the lungs

Medical marijuana advocate John Morgan says cannabis smoking doesn’t “impair lung function” and even “increase(s) lung capacity,” as part of his lawsuit to be filed against the state Thursday.

Florida Politics on Wednesday night acquired a copy of the 15-page complaint that Morgan says he will file in Leon Circuit Civil court in Tallahassee—against which a leading House Republican has already said the state will prevail.

Morgan, the main backer of the marijuana amendment that passed last year, has said he would sue because lawmakers did not allow medicinal marijuana to be smoked. The named plaintiff, People United for Medical Marijuana, seeks a declaratory judgment allowing such cannabis to be lit and inhaled.

He cited a “study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2012” to back up his lung health claim, and added that “despite decades of marijuana being … smok(ed) in the United States, there have been no reported medical cases of lung cancer or emphysema attributed to marijuana.”

Lawmakers recently passed an implementing bill (SB 8-A) for the amendment that did not allow medicinal marijuana to be smoked. An implementing bill gives guidance and instructions to state agencies on how to enforce state law.

“We believe we will win (a) lawsuit,” said House Majority Leader Ray Rodrigues of Estero. He sponsored the House’s version of the implementing bill during both the Regular Session and Special Session this year.

Under the bill, edibles and “vaping” are allowed, but smoking is banned.

“We don’t believe you smoke medicine,” Rodrigues said last month. “We believe that smoking causes as much harm as the benefits, particularly when we’re offering vaping, which provides all of the benefits and none of the harm.”

But Morgan’s suit says the legislative intent of the bill clashes with voter intent expressed in the amendment. The medical cannabis constitutional amendment passed last year with just over 71 percent of statewide voters approving the measure.

For example, a doctor may determine that smoking marijuana gives a particular patient the best benefit of the drug.

By “redefining the constitutionally defined term ‘medical use’ to exclude smoking, the Legislature substitutes its medical judgment for that of a licensed Florida physician and is in direct conflict with the specifically articulated Constitutional process,” the suit says.

Moreover, since the amendment “does not require that the smoking of medical marijuana be allowed in public,” that means “that smoking medical marijuana in a private place in compliance with the provisions of the amendment is legal.”

Morgan wants a judge to fund that any provision banning smoking is “unenforceable,” and seeks reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs.”

The suit names the state, the Department of Health, state Health Secretary and Surgeon General Celeste Philip, Office of Medical Marijuana Use Director Christian Bax, the state Boards of Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine, and their respective chairs, James Orr and Anna Hayden.

Morgan founded the Morgan & Morgan personal-injury law firm in Orlando. His smiling face is recognizable from ubiquitous billboards, television commercials and even bus advertisements across the state.

John Morgan gets ‘ready to rumble’ on no-smoke medical pot

Orlando attorney and entrepreneur John Morgan says he will make good on his threat to sue the state over this year’s implementation bill for medical marijuana because it doesn’t allow such cannabis to be smoked.

“Heading to Tally in the morning to file suit against the state on behalf of the citizens & patients of Florida!!” he tweeted Wednesday afternoon, adding the hashtag #NoSmokeIsAJoke.

He also included a GIF showing boxing ring announcer Michael Buffer and his trademarked catchphrase, “Let’s get ready to rumble!”

A press conference is planned between 9 and 9:30 a.m. outside the Leon County Courthouse, he added.

Morgan, the main backer of the marijuana amendment that passed last year, has said he would sue because lawmakers would not allow medicinal marijuana to be smoked.

“It was part of my amendment,” he said last month. The amendment refers to allowing cannabis to be smoked only indirectly, however.

It says in one section, for instance, the state can’t “require any accommodation of any on-site medical use of marijuana in any correctional institution or detention facility or place of education or employment, or of smoking medical marijuana in any public place.”

The amendment also uses the state law definition of marijuana that includes “every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant or its seeds or resin,” seeming to suggest smokeable cannabis is allowed. 

The 2017 Legislative Session ended without a bill to implement the state’s medical marijuana constitutional amendment. An implementing bill gives guidance and instructions to state agencies on how to enforce state law.

Lawmakers wound up coming up with legislation during a later Special Session.

Gov. Rick Scott approved both a bill (SB 8-A) that implements the state’s medical marijuana constitutional amendment, passed by voters last year, and a companion measure (SB 6-A) that exempts caregivers’ personal information from public disclosure. Both went into effect immediately.

The medical cannabis constitutional amendment passed with just over 71 percent of statewide voters approving the measure.

Florida Department of Health files rules for new medical marijuana law

Florida health officials have announced new statewide medical marijuana rules.

Lobby Tools reports Monday that the newly renamed Office of Medical Marijuana Use at the Florida Department of Health published its Notice of Adoption to carry out legislation passed during the 2017 special session.

The emergency rulemaking process was authorized under SB 8A, which sought to implement the constitutional amendment passed in 2014, and exponentially grow Florida’s medical marijuana market beyond what was originally approved.

 “This will enable the department to quickly implement the time-sensitive requirements of the legislation,” spokesperson Mara Gambineri said in an email Monday. “Following emergency rulemaking, the Department is committed to working collaboratively with the public through traditional rulemaking to establish a patient-centered medical marijuana program.”

Opponents, like state Sen. Jeff Brandes, said the bill created a regulated “state-sanctioned cartel.”

SB 8A allows medical marijuana to be used for the treatment of additional illnesses, including HIV and AIDS, glaucoma, post-traumatic stress disorder, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and similar conditions.

Bills passed in 2014 and 2016 limited the conditions to epilepsy, chronic muscle spasms, cancer and terminal conditions.

The 2017 law bans smoking medical marijuana but does allow vaping, edibles, oils, sprays and tinctures. Orlando attorney and Democratic activist John Morgan, who was behind the constitutional amendment allowing medical marijuana, argues that smoking was part of his amendment. Morgan plans to sue the state.

Tropiflora seeks holdup of new medical marijuana implementing bill

A Florida nursery that previously filed a protest over the Department of Health’s award of medical marijuana licenses is back in court this week.

Tropiflora LLC of Sarasota is asking a judge to delay enforcement of part of the state’s new medical marijuana implementing bill, passed during the recent Special Session. The company filed a motion Monday in Leon County Circuit Civil court.

Specifically, it’s asking for a “stay” of the section of the law‘s “medical marijuana treatment center” licensing scheme. The nursery says the department “wrongfully refused” to consider its license application.

The state law, in effect now, grandfathers in seven existing providers, renames them “medical marijuana treatment centers” (MMTCs) and requires the Department of Health to license 10 new providers by October. The bill also allows four new MMTCs for every increase of 100,000 patients prescribed marijuana.

It limits the number of retail locations each MMTC can open to 25 across the state, and divides that cap by region. As the patient count goes up, five more locations can be opened per provider for every new 100,000 patients in the state’s Medical Marijuana Use Registry. The limits expire in 2020.

In late 2015, Tropiflora was one of the first three nurseries to move against the state over the licensing of growers of medical marijuana. San Felasco Nurseries of Gainesville and Perkins Nursery of LaBelle also filed protests.

At that time, only five licenses were awarded to grow medicinal pot, to Hackney Nursery Co. (northwest region), Chestnut Hill Tree Farm (northeast), Knox Nursery (central), Alpha Foliage (southwest), and Costa Nursery Farms (southeast).

TropiFlora objected because four of the five licenses went to nurseries that also sat on the department’s “negotiated rulemaking” committee, records show.

In 2014, lawmakers passed and Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a measure legalizing low-THC, or “non-euphoric,” marijuana to help children with severe seizures and muscle spasms. THC is the chemical that causes the high from pot.

A three-member panel of state officials in DOH was tasked with selecting five approved pot providers out of 28 nurseries that turned in applications.

Since then, state voters approved a constitutional amendment on medicinal cannabis last year. Lawmakers approved and Scott also signed an implementing bill, which gives guidance and instructions to state agencies on how to enforce state law.

A hearing on Tropiflora’s motion was set for Thursday before Circuit Judge Karen Gievers. Tallahassee attorney Steve Andrews is representing the nursery.

HD 44 special election candidates debate health care, education, marijuana, tourism support

Stark differences of policy positions were evident between the one Democrat and three of the four Republicans running to fill the open Florida House District 44 seat but the differences between the Republicans proved more subtle in a debate Friday, boiling down to who claimed the strongest ownership of particular GOP positions.

The debate sponsored by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce in Ocoee, pitted Democrat Paul Chandler and Republicans Usha Jain, John Newstreet, and Bobby Olszewski, while Republican Bruno Portigliatti sent his regrets.

A few hours after the debate, the West Orange Political Alliance, the political arm of the West Orange Chamber of Commerce, announced it had endorsed Newstreet.

With a question asking how they expected to address the estimated 13 percent of Floridians who are without medical insurance as the Affordable Care Act faces repeal, Olszewski said the state needs to focus on “smart business principles.”

“We need to assure that we have less regulation, to be able to work closely with our insurance companies and our providers. And I think the focus needs to be on preventive medicine. We have a shining example of that here in our own community, with Healthy West Orange, and how they are partnering with West Orange Community Health Care District, and working with our local hospitals and community organizations like the YMCA,” Olszewski said. “When we open up the insurance with competition, and work with our providers with preventive medicine, working with opening up the insurance borders, I think we’ll see a better result here in our home state of Florida.”

Newstreet pointed to his experience as a veteran working within the Veterans Affairs health system.

“As a chamber executive [president of the Kissimmee-Osceola County Chamber of Commerce] I have five hospital facilities within Osceola County and I interact with their CEOs. With the state legislature angle, it’s important we begin with the end in mind. In that regard, I think if the aim to lower costs, to improve outcomes, there definitely is some more work to be done there,” Newstreet said. “Some of the things the Legislature looked at this past session that I think will merit further scrutiny, direct primary care, telemedicine, and as alluded to earlier, preventive care and well-being care programs.”

Jain pointed out that while Olszewski and Newstreet may know hospitals and doctors, she is a doctor — an urgent and emergency care physician in the community for 37 years.
“I have been associated with this issue more than anybody because I see these patients crying; they do not have insurance, they have been waiting in the hospital for many hours,” she said. “That is one of the reasons I am running. I cannot see patients being turned away for not getting care. If you don’t get care, you’ll die. Every citizen should have the right to choose their insurance. We have to have competition. And I want to have a state facility where people can be treated whether you have insurance or not.”

Chandler, who owns a medical billing and data management company, said the answer still lies with getting Florida to include the Medicaid expansion offered in Obamacare. “And the second thing I want to work on is expanding mental health resources and support for mental health treatment centers. Florida is the third most-populous state in the country, yet we’re last in mental health spending,” Chandler said.

The four all pledged support for public education and insisted they consider education critical, with Olszewski and Newstreet pointing out they are the sons of teachers and are married to teachers, and Chandler pointing out he used to be a teacher.

Jain responded with empathy for teachers, saying that her “heart goes out to the people teaching our kids. Where they are, they are not getting enough … Everybody should be paid according to what they do.”

Newstreet and Jain both expressed their personal opposition to medical marijuana and while accepting that it is the law in Florida, both said they would work to keep the program from expanding. Newstreet and Olszewski both said the state must work closely with local governments to make sure they have the tools they need to have local safeguards in place.

“As a Coast Guard veteran where my comrades to this day continue to interdict and fight the drug trade, I can’t support this,” Newstreet said. “But it is the law of the land.”

One of the state’s licensed grower-producer-marketer of marijuana products, Knox Medical, is located in Winter Garden, within HD 44.

Chandler expressed strong support for the medical marijuana program and chastised Republicans for not making more of a priority of last fall’s overwhelming approval of Constitution Amendment 2.

And, Chandler added, medical marijuana should be more available to help people reliant on addictive “painkillers and opiates, which have overdoses and kill people.”

All four expressed strong support for funding for Visit Florida, which the Florida Legislature nearly cut by $25 million amid reports and allegations that it had become an out-of-control and unaccountable agency.

House District 44 is home to Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, and Universal Orlando.

“I think we have a couple of theme parks in House District 44, don’t we?” Olszewski said when asked if he supported Visit Florida. “There is no doubt we need to fund VISIT Florida, but being financially responsible.”

Chandler said VISIT Florida marketing actually contributed to his decision to move to Florida from St. Louis 15 years ago.

Newstreet called tourism the area’s “lifeblood,” and said the tourism community “will have no better friend in Tallahassee than me.”

Health Department getting started on medical marijuana rulemaking

In the wake of the Special Session’s implementing bill, the Florida Department of Health is gearing up to make rules governing the use of medical marijuana.

The department published a “notice of proposed regulation” in the Florida Administrative Register last Friday.

But the state still could face a lawsuit from personal-injury attorney John Morgan, who backed the constitutional amendment on medical marijuana that passed in 2016 with 71 percent of the vote. He has said he will sue because lawmakers would not allow medical marijuana to be smoked.

The implementing bill (SB 8-A) is pending Gov. Rick Scott‘s review, though he said he will sign it.

Among other provisions, the bill grandfathers in seven existing providers, renames them “medical marijuana treatment centers” (MMTCs) and requires the Department to license 10 new providers by October. The bill also allows four new MMTCs for every increase of 100,000 patients prescribed marijuana.

It also limits the number of retail locations each MMTC can open to 25 across the state, and divides that cap by region. As the patient count goes up, five more locations can be opened per provider for every new 100,000 patients in the state’s Medical Marijuana Use Registry. The limits expire in 2020.

The department is working under an expedited rulemaking process to conform with deadlines in the amendment. Lawmakers failed to come to agreement on a bill during this year’s Regular Session. 

Before the amendment, the state in 2014 legalized low-THC, or “non-euphoric,” marijuana to help children with severe seizures and muscle spasms. THC is the chemical that causes the high from pot.

The state later expanded the use of medicinal marijuana through another measure, the “Right to Try Act,” that includes patients suffering intractable pain and loss of appetite from terminal illnesses.

 

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