Rick Scott says Disney punishment shouldn’t hurt taxpayers
Rick Scott says SCOTUS decision will drive Democratic cash.

rick scott
"Tallahassee's got to make sure that doesn't happen."

U.S. Sen. Rick Scott said Wednesday that any decoupling of Disney from its special tax district status shouldn’t hurt taxpayers.

During an interview on Newsmax, Scott told host Sean Spicer that the sunset of the Reedy Creek Improvement District shouldn’t result in Disney debt being passed to taxpayers in Orange and Osceola Counties and them being “hurt by this.”

“Tallahassee’s got to make sure that doesn’t happen. That would not be fair,” Scott said. “And I think it’s very important that Tallahassee make sure that’s not the case. That they’re not putting additional burdens on the county taxpayers there.”

The most recent Special Session included legislation (SB 4C) to repeal the now-controversial Reedy Creek Improvement District (RCID), which grants Walt Disney World functional autonomy to govern itself, in the wake of the company opposing the Parental Rights in Education bill.

Scott had already talked Disney’s dilemma earlier Wednesday, and he suggested then that there were some questions about the path forward after the snap decision to sunset Reedy Creek.

He said on The Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show that he was still trying to “understand” variables regarding the statutorily mandated sunset of the Reedy Creek Improvement District.

“I’ve been trying to understand exactly, because they have a significant amount of debt on that special taxing district, who’s going to pay for that? Is there going to be an increase in taxes anywhere? And who’s going to provide the services that Disney provides? I think it’s something that we all really have to understand,” Scott said.

“No one should get a special deal,” Scott added. “And we all should be treated the same by government.”

Still, he said legislators should be diligent in reviewing the effects going forward.

“We have to look at it,” Scott said. “But let’s don’t hurt ourselves.”

Scott also said during the interview that “Disney had put a target on itself,” noting that he believed government should review special taxing districts.

“I think you should always be doing it,” Scott said, to make sure they are “good for the state.”

Scott has repeatedly dissed Disney in recent weeks. On Monday, he said he has no plans to go back to Disney World and that he’s canceled his subscription to the Disney+ streaming service during a Fox Business Network interview. He repeated that vow Wednesday.

Earlier this month, he characterized Disney as a “responsible corporate citizen” when he was Governor through 2018, but his attitude has clearly changed since.

The new Parental Rights in Education law that Disney objects to will limit classroom instruction on certain topics. “Instruction on sexual orientation or gender identity” is banned for students in kindergarten through third grade, as is instruction for all students “in a manner that is not age-appropriate or developmentally appropriate for students in accordance with state standards.”

Scott’s confusion, meanwhile, is shared by stakeholders at many levels. The Disney government is in the dark about what happens next. Fitch Ratings has put Reedy Creek on notice, with a placement on a “negative watch” list. A potential downgrade looms.

___

Material from The Associated Press contributed to this report.

A.G. Gancarski

A.G. Gancarski has written for FloridaPolitics.com since 2014. He is based in Northeast Florida. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter: @AGGancarski


2 comments

  • PeterH

    April 27, 2022 at 4:08 pm

    Scott’s “special deals” comment is beyond ridiculous!

    Here’s Bloomberg News summary from when Scott’s sweet heart deal to gun manufacturers! The $1.6 million tax break incentive resulted in less than 3 dozen Florida jobs!

    From Bloomberg News:

    “In Florida, Republican Governor Rick Scott hailed an incentive for the West Hartford, Connecticut-based Colt Manufacturing Co. in 2011 saying it showed the state was “a defender of our right to bear arms.” The deal, for 63 jobs, was worth about $1.66 million in state and local incentives, according to Enterprise Florida, the state’s economic development arm. The agreement penalizes the company $50,000 if it doesn’t produce all the jobs.

    Frank Attkisson, a commissioner in Osceola County, which provided incentives, said it was a “sweetheart deal” for Colt and that the county would put tougher controls on future subsidies.”

    Ugh….. to today’s Republican Party filled with grifters at taxpayer expense. VOTE!

  • Behind it

    April 27, 2022 at 4:18 pm

    I fully support republicans harming themselves

Comments are closed.


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