Supreme Court to hear case on state authority over elections
The number of justices on the Supreme Court is set by Congress and has fluctuated throughout the nation’s history.

supreme court
The case probably will be argued in the fall.

The Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear an appeal from North Carolina Republicans that could drastically limit state court authority over congressional redistricting, as well as elections for Congress and the presidency.

The justices will consider whether state courts, finding violations of their state constitutions, can order changes to federal elections and the once-a-decade redrawing of congressional districts.

The case probably will be argued in the fall.

The appeal challenges a state court ruling throwing out the congressional districts drawn by North Carolina’s General Assembly that made GOP candidates likely victors in 10 of the state’s 14 congressional districts.

The Supreme Court has never invoked what is known as the independent state legislature doctrine, but four of the court’s conservative justices have expressed interest in taking on the subject.

One of them, Justice Clarence Thomas, was among three justices who advanced it in the Bush v. Gore case that settled the 2000 presidential election.

It only takes four of the nine justices to agree to hear a case. A majority of five is needed for an eventual decision.

The issue has arisen repeatedly in cases from North Carolina and Pennsylvania, where Democratic majorities on the states’ highest courts have invoked voting protections in their state constitutions to frustrate the plans of Republican-dominated legislatures.

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Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Associated Press


One comment

  • Tom

    June 30, 2022 at 8:36 pm

    Liberal extreme Sup. Court Judges in these two states have abused the “Legislatures” constitutional authority on map drawing. The courts are not the super plenary body.

    Ordering maps to be drawn by courts is abusive.
    If a court was to reject a legislative drawn map, it needs require the legislature to redraw. Not take it and do so, as Florida did rightly.

    I hope the Supremes take this case and set the example for future map drawing.

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