Highlights from recent Jacksonville City Council race fundraising – Florida Politics

Highlights from recent Jacksonville City Council race fundraising

With roughly a year before voters cast first ballots in the 2019 Jacksonville City Council elections, it’s a good time to take a look at fundraising in selected races through February.

With $8,400 of new money in February, Matt Carlucci, a former Council Republican running for at-large Group 4, is still the clubhouse leader with just over $221,000 raised. Carlucci’s opponent, fellow former Council member Don Redman, a Republican, has a lot of ground to make up.

Word on the street is more candidates will enter this one.

As we reported last week, Republican Ron Salem has over $150,000 on hand in at-large Group 2. This number puts him well ahead of former Councilman Bill Bishop. Bishop raised just $2,000, with just over $13,200 on hand.

Democrat Darren Mason only entered the race in March.

In District 14, Democrat Sunny Gettinger showed respectable first-month fundraising numbers in February, bringing in over $34,000. Gettinger still has a ways to go to catch Republican Randy DeFoor, who raised $4,350 in March and has nearly $90,000 on hand in hard money, and $25,000 in an affiliated political committee, “Safe and Prosperous Jacksonville.”

District 5 looks like it’s Republican LeAnna Cumber‘s race to lose. $15,950 of new February money leaves Cumber with $168,000 on hand against a Democrat who has $473 in his account.

In District 6, Republican Rose Conry continues to dominate, with $65,000 on hand compared to roughly $20,000 on hand for fellow Republican Michael Boylan. Conry had another $10,000 plus month in February, including a donation from Mayor Lenny Curry‘s political committee. Boylan brought in over $17,000, highlighted by donations from Steve Halverson and Mark Frisch.

In District 7, incumbent Democrat Reggie Gaffney is pulling away from a gaggle of underfunded competition. $8,800 of new February money pushed Gaffney over $27,000 on hand, with his closest competition (Sharise Riley) having just $6,000 on hand. John Baker and Sleiman Holdings cut checks last month for Gaffney.

In District 8, we still await incumbent Katrina Brown‘s first campaign finance report. Tameka Gaines Holly is the cash leader just now, with $5,401 of February money giving her over $13,500 on hand.

Unopposed in District 13, Republican Rory Diamond raised over $8,000 in February; he has $114,200 on hand.

District 2 Republican Councilman Al Ferraro launched his campaign for re-election last month and christened his coffers with $10,800 in new money. His most interesting donations came from the family of developer Toney Sleiman, a man at odds with the Mayor’s Office these days.

District 10, meanwhile, is a multi-Democrat field with light fundraising and no clarity in the coffers thus far.

4 Comments

  1. Curry was born in Key West.[1] He later grew up in Middleburg, Florida and graduated from Middleburg High School. Curry began his higher education at St. Johns River Community College, then transferred to the University of Florida and graduated summa cum laude with a degree in accounting.[2] He married his wife, Molly, in 2005. They have three children: Boyd, Brook, and Bridgett.[3]

    From 1994 to 2002, he practiced as a certified public accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers. In 2002, he co‐founded a Jacksonville-based professional services firm, ICX Group Inc., providing finance and accounting consulting, executive recruiting, and staffing services.

    On June 3, 2014, Curry filed to run in the Jacksonville mayoral election in 2015. He decided to enter the race because beginning in late 2012 and early 2013, he began hearing about “leadership troubles” under incumbent Democratic mayor Alvin Brown.

  2. Mike Pence’s bio.

    Born and raised in Columbus, Indiana, Pence graduated from Hanover College and earned a law degree from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law before entering private practice. After losing two bids for a U.S. congressional seat in 1988 and 1990, he became a conservative radio and television talk show host from 1994 to 1999. Pence was elected to the United States Congress in 2000 and represented Indiana’s 2nd congressional district and Indiana’s 6th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 2001 to 2013. He served as the chairman of the House Republican Conference from 2009 to 2011.[2] Pence positioned himself as a “principled conservative” and supporter of the Tea Party movement,[3] stating that he was “a Christian, a conservative, and a Republican, in that order.”[4]

    Upon becoming Governor of Indiana in January 2013, Pence initiated the largest tax cut in Indiana’s history and pushed for more funding for education initiatives. Pence signed bills intended to restrict abortions, including one that prohibited abortions if the reason for the procedure was the fetus’s race, gender, or disability.[5] After Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, he encountered fierce resistance from moderate members of his party, the business community, and LGBT advocates. Shortly thereafter, he signed legislation banning discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and other criteria.

    On November 8, 2016, Pence was elected as Vice President, after he dropped out of his gubernatorial reelection campaign in July to become the vice presidential running mate for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who went on to win the presidential election.

    Early life and career

  3. Randy Defoor’s candidate statement Candidate’s Statement

    Randy Shoemaker DeFoor is a Senior Vice President and National Agency Counsel for Fidelity National Financial, a fortune 500 company. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of the South and JD degree from Cumberland School of Law. Randy served as a commissioner of the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission from 2006-2012. She currently serves on the Jacksonville International Airport Community Redevelopment Area. She served as a trustee on the boards of Episcopal School of Jacksonville for twelve years and Riverside Presbyterian Day School for eight years. In 2012, Randy was appointed by Governor Scott to the District Board of Trustees for Florida State College at Jacksonville where she served a term as Chairman. She also serves on the Women’s Board of Wolfson Children’s Hospital and

  4. It’s extremely troubling that “Republican” candidate Rory Diamond – a militant homosexual activist – continues to raise $$$ from his like-minded “friends” and “allies.” If Diamond is elected to the Jacksonville City Council, he will vote to maintain the grossly-misnamed “Human Rights Ordinance,” which discriminates against Christians and gives special rights to homosexuals (like Diamond). I also would not be surprised if Diamond has plans to go after Christians in other ways, such as by trying to prohibit churches from ministering to gender-confused individuals. Diamond is bringing his liberal California “values” to northeast Florida! BEWARE OF WOLVES IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING!

    P.S. I wonder if the lengthy “comments” preceding mine were meant to bury any critical comments about Diamond? Oftentimes, the tactics employed by Diamond and his cronies (or puppet masters) are ridiculously obvious.

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