Adam Putnam Archives - Florida Politics

Former Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll endorses Baxter Troutman for Agriculture Commissioner

Former Florida Rep. Baxter Troutman, a Winter Haven Republican, was endorsed by former Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll Monday in his run for Agriculture Commissioner.

Troutman, the grandson of the late Ben Hill Griffin, noted citrus baron and a former Democratic candidate for governor, announced Friday he was officially opening his campaign for the post. It is currently held by fellow Polk County native and Bartow Republican Adam Putnam who is term-limited for the office and is running for governor.

Carroll joined Troutman last week, introducing him to voters in Duval, Nassau and Clay counties.

“Now, more than ever, we need an Agriculture Commissioner who will look out for Florida’s farmers, ranchers and consumers. I’ve known Baxter Troutman for 15 years,” she said in an emailed statement from the campaign. “His lifetime in the agriculture industry and his record of job creation make him undoubtedly the most qualified man for the job. He’s running to help the community he grew up in.”

Troutman campaign manager Carlo Fassi said the Carroll endorsement, “shows the campaign is up and running and ready to take on the workload ahead.”

Troutman will face state Sen. Denise Grimsley of Sebring and Rep. Matt Caldwell of North Fort Myers in the August Republican Primary. The sole Democrat declaring for the post is conservationist and researcher R. David Walker of Fort Lauderdale.

‘#1 Conservative’ Ron DeSantis to kick off gubernatorial campaign next week

Rep. Ron DeSantis, a Congressman representing St. Johns, Flagler, and Volusia Counties, will kick off his gubernatorial campaign next week.

And it won’t be anywhere near his district.

The campaign will launch at the Boca Raton Embassy Suites on Jan. 29 at 11 a.m.

According to an email to supporters: “The excitement and momentum is squarely behind Ron DeSantis. He has already been endorsed by President Donald Trump, Sean Hannity, and Mark Levin — and we haven’t even kicked off the campaign yet!”

DeSantis’ leading primary opponent, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, has over $15 million cash on hand, but DeSantis is unfazed.

He bills himself as the “#1 conservative in Florida” on his invite to the Boca Raton event, where he will build on remarks made on Fox and Friends as the year started — when DeSantis confirmed that he would in fact run.

“As a military officer, an Iraq veteran, and a proven conservative, with the support of the president, I’m in a position to exercise the leadership that can build on the great work that Governor Rick Scott has done to advance economic opportunity, reform education, and drain the swamp in Tallahassee that needs to be drained just like Washington,” DeSantis affirmed.

DeSantis — now within five points of Putnam in the most recent poll from the Florida Chamber — has a finance team that can compete with any candidate in the field, should it become fully engaged.

Here are just a few of the names:

Palm Beach billionaire Thomas Peterffy; Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Adelson; timeshare moguls Jackie and David Siegel; Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus; Palm Beach fundraisers Gay and Stanley Gaines; David Bossie, chairman of the Citizens United political activism organization and deputy campaign director for Trump; Republican financier Rebekah Mercer of New York and Foster Friess of Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

The contrast between the slick DeSantis operation and that of Putnam, a candidate who prides himself on knowing the concerns of every county in the state, is stark.

DeSantis clearly will have national backing and has enjoyed ready access to Fox News, a network taken very seriously by the super voters who will decide the 2018 nomination.

Philip Levine launches Spanish commercial on DACA

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Philip Levine has launched another television commercial – his fourth overall and second this week – with a Spanish-language ad decrying the administration of President Donald Trump‘s policies toward so-called DREAMers, the young, undocumented immigrants who essentially grew up in the United States.

The 30-second spot “Injusticia” shows images of DREAMers and their families while a narrator attacks Trump for rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program initiated by former President Barack Obama, and for his rhetoric threatening to send them back to their native countries even though their parents brought them to the United States when they were small children.

It’s the second-consecutive commercial in which Levine, a state candidate, targets Trump on what is essentially a federal issue. Earlier this week he launched an English-language commercial, running statewide, going after Trump for his policy position to open up oil-drilling off the Florida coast, thought that commercial also mentions Florida’s Republican Gov. Rick Scott.

“President Trump is turning his back on these young people who, filled with dreams, became doctors, lawyers and teachers. And who today are ready to work for America,” the narrator states. “Philip Levine will work to end this injustice!”

Levine then uses his own Spanish, declaring, “We are talking about kids, and what it means to be an American.”

Levine is the only gubernatorial candidate to place commercials on television so far. He faces Chris King, Gwen Graham, and Andrew Gillum in the Democratic primary contest, while Ron DeSantis and Adam Putnam are the leading Republicans.

Levine’s independent political committee All About Florida is putting up $100,000 to run the ad for 10 days on Spanish-language television channels across Florida.

“We want DREAMers to know that they are not alone, and that there are many who are fighting for them and believe in doing the right thing,” Christian Ulvert, senior advisor, stated in a news release from All About Florida.

Baxter Troutman: ‘This is it for me’

When former state Rep. Baxter Troutman was 16, he attended Boys State. There, he ran for Agriculture Commissioner.

Three decades later, Troutman has followed up on the reality of a rather idiosyncratic-seeming childhood goal.

He is one of four Republicans vying for the opportunity to become Agriculture Commissioner.

Unlike the incumbent, Adam Putnam, who seemed like he was angling to be Governor from the time he entered politics, Troutman sees the Ag Commissioner slot as a final destination.

“This is it for me,” Troutman said.

In part because the prospect of running statewide for something else eight years from now at the age of 60 doesn’t interest him. But also in part because being Agriculture Commissioner is his goal.

Troutman is one of those politicians who says he’s “not a politician.”

He seems to believe it.

A citrus farmer by lineage, who set up a labor staffing agency to find workers to build a prison at Cross Creek 20 years ago (“an American dream type story,” Troutman related), Troutman thinks that — unlike Reps. Denise Grimsley and Matt Caldwell — he has relevant private sector experience.

“I consider myself a statesman, not a politician,” Troutman said. “If voters look under the sheets, that sets me apart.”

Troutman intended to run in 2010 — but got talked down by the man who currently holds the job.

“At the end of the discussion,” Troutman recounted, “we decided I would wait.”

“I termed out of the Legislature,” Troutman added, “then I went home and waited.”

He is animated by the panoply of challenges faced by the Agriculture Commissioner, running the gamut from the “plight” of ranchers and farmers to the rich tapestry of consumer services, a field which “touches everyone’s lives.”

However, this will be an expensive race: Troutman has staked his own campaign $2.5 million, giving him a cash-on-hand advantage. Meanwhile, in terms of fundraising Caldwell and Grimsley are ahead.

While Troutman can spend the money, if he is a threat it will be spent against him.

Nasty opposition will float, Troutman knows, including from an incident with his wife years back that made statewide news.

On his birthday, the Troutmans had a disagreement. He was accused of throwing a bedspread at her. 911 was called.

Troutman spent a night in jail.

The “unfortunate, unnecessary incident … the most embarrassing thing that’s ever happened to me,” said the candidate, is ancient history.

“I don’t know of any marriage that doesn’t go through a challenging time,” Troutman said. “We’re stronger today than we’ve ever been.”

Noting that his wife runs a political committee on his behalf, Troutman adds that “my wife fully endorses my campaign.”

Citrus agency shifts money as industry seeks aid

The Florida Department of Citrus adjusted its budget Wednesday for the second time this growing season, as leaders of the storm-battered industry hold out hope the U.S. Senate will approve a disaster-relief package.

The Citrus Commission, which oversees the department, agreed to shift more than $70,000 out of administration, scientific-research and global-marketing budgets to cover an anticipated drop in revenue from December.

The Department of Citrus is funded through a “box” tax on citrus. Revenues have dropped as citrus production has declined in recent years because of citrus-greening disease and destruction from September’s Hurricane Irma.

Christine Marion, commission secretary, said the agency reduced research materials by $10,000, a nutritional program by $45,000, and administrative costs by $23,500.

Department officials said they were able to make the cuts without eliminating programs or personnel. The administrative changes were made through scaling back on areas that included training, vehicle purchases, equipment-rental fees and database fees.

The moves came despite a January forecast for this season’s citrus crops holding mostly stable when the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced a monthly outlook last Friday.

The monthly numbers were the first sign of a potential bottom from the devastation of Hurricane Irma, which washed away up to 70 percent to 90 percent of the crop for some growers in South and Central Florida. Still, the December and January forecasts represent a 15 percent drop from the initial forecast in October and a 33 percent reduction from the prior seasons’ five-decade low output of oranges and grapefruit.

In December, the commission shifted $556,147 from reserves to cover a separate anticipated reduction in the budget.

The budget adjustments have come as the industry awaits the fate of an $81 billion disaster relief package the U.S. House approved in December that is targeted for hurricane-impacted areas of Florida, Texas and Puerto Rico and wildfire-damaged regions of California. The package, which has been held up as Congress works on a short-term funding bill, includes $2.6 billion for agriculture.

Citrus Commission Chairman G. Ellis Hunt, who traveled to Washington, D.C. in December, said Wednesday it is “frustrating” that the Senate won’t take a “clean vote” on the package.

“We’re just going to pursue and not give up,” Hunt said.

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs estimated in October that Irma caused $2.5 billion in damage to the state’s agriculture industry, including $761 million to the citrus industry.

State lawmakers have said the citrus crop damage has since topped $1 billion but no further post-storm estimates have been made.

“Florida’s iconic citrus industry and its growers continue to struggle with the unprecedented damage caused by Hurricane Irma,” Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam said after the monthly forecast was released Friday. “This damage, combined with the cumulative impacts of citrus greening, leaves Florida’s growers in desperate need of support.”

New Philip Levine TV ad focuses on off-shore drilling threat

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Philip Levine is launching a new television commercial throughout Florida today accusing Gov. Rick Scott of denying climate change and vowing that any threat of oil drilling off Florida’s coast  “is going to stop” if Levine is elected governor.

The 30-second ad “Denial” is backed by a $375,000 broadcast and cable TV ad buy for the next two weeks in all ten Florida media markets. It’s the third television commercial launched by the Levine campaign, the first to go statewide, and the first to be explicitly about a public policy issue. His first ads were introductory.

It’s also the first statewide television commercial by any 2018 candidate.

In Denial, Levine seeks to lump President Donald Trump, Scott, the oil industry, climate change denial, and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon/BP Oil disaster all into one issue. It begins with scenes of the Deepwater Horizon/BP Oil spill off the coast of Louisiana which brought oil onto Florida Panhandle beaches, and dragged down Florida’s entire tourism economy for a year.

The ad implicitly builds on the announcement two weeks ago by the Trump administration that it intends to open up off-shore oil exploration throughout the country, including off Florida’s coast, when current federal moratoriums end. It does not explicitly address the announcement by Scott that he talked U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke into leaving out Florida, though the Levine campaign argues in a news release that assurance has very little practical value. The ad also does not address that Levine’s Democratic gubernatorial primary opponents, Chris King, Gwen Graham, and Andrew Gillum, all are as adamant as he about preventing any future drilling off Florida’s coast.

Nor does it explicitly claim that Scott, or leading Republican gubernatorial candidates Adam Putnam or Ron DeSantis, ever supported off-shore drilling along Florida. Yet it paints a picture bringing together environmental disaster with the denials of climate change by leading Republicans, starting with Trump and Scott.

In announcing the ad Wednesday morning, the Levine campaign cited a POLITICO story that reported that many members of Congress, including the chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, Utah Republican U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop, “acknowledge that there are no ‘long-term assurances’ [from Secretary Zinke] that plans to drill off the coast would not return.” Others have said the same thing.

“The BP oil spill was one of the worst environmental disasters in history,” the ad begins.

“Now we have a governor who denies climate change, a president who denies everything, and a Congress that may start allowing drilling,” Levine declares as he walks along a beach. “When I’m governor, the threat of drilling is gonna stop.”

Ag Commissioner candidates Matt Caldwell, Denise Grimsley raise big in December

Republican Rep. Matt Caldwell pulled in six-figures for his Agriculture Commissioner campaign last month, which was good enough for the top spot among the four candidates gunning to replace termed out Ag Commissioner Adam Putnam.

Caldwell pulled in $39,201 for his campaign account and another $59,500 for his political committee, for a combined $101,701 raised last month. The Lehigh Acres lawmaker started 2018 with over $1 million cash on hand.

“Matt is the hardest working candidate in the race for Commissioner of Agriculture and continues to build momentum every day heading into the election year. He is outraising his opponents, has traveled more than 41,000 miles across the State since May, is the principled conservative in the race, and the only candidate that has consistently received an A rating from the NRA,” said campaign spokesman Brian Swensen in a press release touting the numbers.

Caldwell is running against Sebring Republican Sen. Denise Grimsley and former state Rep. Baxter Troutman in the Republican Primary for the cabinet post. Also running is David Walker, who is so far the only Democrat to file.

Grimsley raised $90,275 last month, $23,525 for her campaign and another $66,750 for her political committee, Saving Florida’s Heartland. The December performance was offset by more than $150,000 in spending, leaving her with about $872,000 on hand at the start of the year.

Her top donor last month was U.S. Sugar, which cut a $25,000 check to her committee the day after Christmas, followed by $7,500 contributions from Michael Margolis and Joseph Jacobs. The Automobile Club Political Action Committee, The Auto Club Group, Florida Fire-PAC and David Mack each chipped in $5,000.

Nearly half of Grimsley’s December spending, $72,000, went toward sponsoring the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence, with Tallahassee-based Strategic Digital Services taking a distant second place at about $30,000 for digital media services and web advertising.

Troutman raised just $7,875 for the month and spent $50,746, marking the first time he has dipped into the $2.5 million cushion he supplied his campaign when he filed back in June.

His top donors were William and Debbie Bachshmidt of Inglis, who each cut $2,500 checks to the Winter Haven Republican’s campaign account.

The bulk of his spending came from a $30,000 payment to Tallahassee-based Meteoric Media Strategies for campaign consulting, followed by $9,500 Nashville-based Acquire Digital for website management, about $6,100 to Carlo Fassi for a consulting contract, and $5,000 to The Archmann Group for fundraising help.

He finished the year with $2.5 million on hand between his campaign account and political committee, iGrow PC, which hasn’t reported a contribution since August.

Walker continued his streak bringing up the rear with just $510 raised last month, which was wiped out by $1,778 in spending. Including $9,500 in loans, Walker has raised $15,240 since filing in mid-August and had $1,638 in his campaign account on New Year’s Day.

Stable, still dismal: Citrus forecast low but steady

Recent Florida citrus estimates are steady for the first time since Hurricane Irma struck Florida.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s January estimates reflect no change from December’s, marking the first stable citrus forecast since the storm.

The USDA in October forecasted 54 million boxes of oranges for 2017-2018 production. In November, that forecast dropped to 50 million followed by another decrease in December to 46 million – an estimate that remained for January’s forecast.

And yet, while seemingly stable, the forecasts are dismal.

Florida Department of Citrus Executive Director Shannon Shepp said the state’s citrus industry still faces its lowest forecast in more than 75 years.

The monthly forecasts are best guesses; the real numbers come after the growing season ends. It’s those figures that tell the story of citrus in Florida.

Along with Irma, the state’s citrus industry has been hit by the citrus greening epidemic. The so-far incurable disease attacks the fruit, causing it to turn green and bitter, and eventually killing the tree.

“While the temporary comfort of a stable forecast gives us a moment to breathe it doesn’t hide the fact that this industry remains in crisis due to the impact of Hurricane Irma,” Shepp said.

In the 2016-2017 season, Florida produced close to 69 million boxes of oranges. Florida growers are looking to the state and federal government for remedy.

“Florida’s iconic citrus industry and its growers continue to struggle with the unprecedented damage caused by Hurricane Irma,” Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam said in a separate statement.

“This damage, combined with the cumulative impacts of citrus greening, leaves Florida’s growers in desperate need of support,” he added. “I will continue to work with Gov. (Rick) Scott and leaders in Washington to get Florida’s growers the relief they need to rebuild and replant.”

The U.S. House of Representatives passed an $81 billion disaster spending bill. A $2.6 billion agricultural assistance package for Florida growers was included in that bill.

State estimates reported an estimated $2.5 billion crop loss to Florida growers following Irma. The state’s recurring message is that the storm “could not have been more lethal” to Florida citrus.

Scott’s proposed “Securing Florida’s Future” budget recommends $22 million for the Sunshine State’s citrus industry. Lawmakers are sure to address the situation when crafting their own budget this Legislative Session.

Florida Chamber poll puts Adam Putnam, Gwen Graham out front, with lots undecided

A new statewide poll conducted by the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Florida Chamber Political Institute finds Floridians comfortable that the state is headed in the right direction and give Gov. Rick Scott some of his highest approval ratings, with usual splits on those opinions between Republicans and Democrats.

The poll finds Republican Adam Putnam and Democrat Gwen Graham are leading their parties’ gubernatorial races, though half or more of the likely voters surveyed in each party have not made up their minds.

The Florida Chamber Political Institute also found voters are most concerned about education, followed by the economy and health care, but really aren’t all that concerned about issues involving guns, terrorism, or marijuana.

The poll sets the table for 2018 elections, which also will likely include numerous proposed constitutional amendments. The first two teed up, involving homestead exemptions and property taxes, already are over or close to the 60 percent approval thresholds needed to be approved, the poll found.

“Voters will elect a new governor, all new members of the Florida Cabinet and 140 members to the Florida House and Senate. It’s still very early in what will be a busy 2018 election cycle. In the coming months, voters will begin to take a much closer look at the candidates for office,” Marian Johnson, senior vice president for political operations for the Florida Chamber of Commerce, stated in a news release.

In the institute’s first statewide poll of the new year:

– 56 percent of likely voters believe Florida is headed in the right direction. Republicans are especially optimistic at 76 percent, while more than half of voters with no party affiliations [56 percent] believe Florida is moving in the right direction. Less than half of Democrats [34 percent] believe Florida is headed in the right direction.

– 57 percent of all registered voters approve of Scott’s job performance. Republicans approve by 82 percent, while 30 percent of Democrats, and 56 percent of NPA voters approve.

– Among Democratic gubernatorial candidates, Graham leads with 14 percent, however 64 percent of voters remain undecided. Philip Levine garners 7 percent; Andrew Gillum, 6 percent; and Chris King, just 1 percent.

– On the Republican side, Putnam gets 23 percent and Ron DeSantis 18 percent, with 50 percent undecided.

Among issues that matter most to voters, education ahead with 17 percent; jobs and economy drew 13 percent; health care, 12 percent; immigration, 5 percent; and global warming, 5 percent. Guns, terrorism and marijuana barely registered, the institute reported.

Amendment 1, calling for increasing the homestead exemption, got 61 percent overall, with the spread from Democrats, NPA voters and Republicans fairly tight, from 52 to 69 percent. Amendment 2, making permanent a cap annual non-homeastead property tax increases, has 54 percent overall support, with the party spread ranging from 60 to 58 percent.

The poll also found trends showing the greater potency of independent voters: 42 percent of all new voters in the past year registered without a party affiliation, while Democrats and Republicans each captured 27 percent of new voters. Among new Hispanic voters, 54 percent signed up without a party, 32 percent registered as Democrats, and 14 percent as Republicans.

Philip Levine: Check to Marco Rubio ‘tiny’ compared with long, deep Democratic support

There’s that Sept. 30, 2009, check to the U.S. Senate campaign of former Florida House Speaker Marco Rubio:

It’s the $2,400 contribution to a Republican who then was seen as the darling of Florida’s Tea Party movement, an upstart whose explosive popularity on the right chased Charlie Crist from the Grand Old Party and made Democratic candidate Kendrick Meek a third-place finisher in 2010.

It’s the bank draft from Miami Beach businessman Philip Levine, who then was the future mayor of that city and who now is one of the leading Democratic candidates for governor in the 2018 election.

Privately, some Democrats have been whispering wonder about whether Levine’s erstwhile support of Rubio in 2009 reflected at all on his commitment to the Florida Democratic Party.

“Nope. Not at all. Zero,” Levine insisted in Orlando Tuesday when asked about whether that contribution meant he harbored an interest in Rubio or for what he stands.

“I have written millions of dollars to the Democratic Party, and that was just one small, tiny donation,” Levine said. “Friends of mine called me up and asked me for it, and I said ‘yes.’

“But he’s been a disappointment, and I’m not a supporter or a believer in any way, shape or imagination,” Levine continued. “Thank God my Democratic donations outnumber it about 5,000 to one.”

Levine is in a crowded race seeking the Florida Democratic primary nomination to run for governor, with former U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham of Tallahassee, Winter Park businessman Chris King, and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum; and terms such as “real Democrat,” “true Democrat,” and “lifelong Democrat” already have been tossed about in that contest, as if someone in the race is not. The leading Republicans are Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam of Bartow and U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis of Ponte Vedra Beach.

“Mayor Levine has raised millions of dollars for fellow Democrats, up and down the ballot,” spokesman Christian Ulvert stated. “Most importantly, his record of getting progressive policies done is crystal clear — and it’s exactly the leadership he will take to the Governor’s mansion.”

Levine tells his story often about how he left college to work as a Royal Caribbean cruise ship deckhand, later following his instinct to become an entrepreneur serving cruise ships, to starting up and then selling companies, to becoming very rich.

By the late-1990s he became an active political campaign contributor, and by early this century he was a prominent one, making him an extraordinarily unusual candidate for governor. Other wealthy candidates have run statewide in Florida before, notably Republican incumbent Gov. Rick Scott and Democrat Jeff Greene of West Palm Beach, who ran for the U.S. Senate in 2010; yet neither previously had been as financially generous to others’ political causes as Levine had.

Though they do not quite show the multiple millions he asserted, U.S. Federal Election Commission and the Florida Division of Elections records do show that Philip Levine — from addresses in Miami, Miami Beach and Tallahassee — has contributed more than $1 million to others over the past couple of decades. He also has donated nearly $3 million to his own campaign’s funds in the past year.

Levine donated at least $189,900 to various state campaigns and political committees in Florida, and another $893,385 to various federal campaigns and political committees in Florida and across the country.

Campaign finance activity reviewed by Florida Politics does not include any political contributions Levine may have made in local elections in Florida [he was a two-term mayor of Miami Beach,] nor any he may have made in local or state elections in other states. Those would have been recorded outside the FEC and the Florida Division of Elections.

Levine, in fact, has a clear record of donating to Democrats for many years. His donations for Democrats compared with those for Republicans do not entirely create a 5,000-1 ratio, but it is higher than a 200-1 ratio, at least in dollars.

Since 2000, he has donated $161,800 to the Florida Democratic Party [including $61,800 in 2016] and at least another $12,500 to specific Democratic candidates and committees. Another $16,600 of his state political contributions went to committees that at least on paper may be considered nonpartisan. No state-level Levine money went to Republicans, the Republican Party of Florida, or Republican committees.

On the federal side, since 1999, Levine made at least 270 donations totaling $876,791 to Democrats, Democratic parties, and committees associated with Democrats. He has made six contributions totaling about $12,000 to committees that have some claim to being nonpartisan, or have unclear partisan standing.

He’s made just four donations, adding up to $4,650, to Republicans, including the Rubio check.

Levine was a big backer of Hillary Clinton, donating $300,000 to her Hillary Victory Fund committee in 2016. He also was a significant backer of Barack Obama, donating $30,000 to his Obama Victory Fund committee in 2008.

In contrast with the $2,400 he gave to U.S. Senate Republican candidate Rubio, over the past two decades Levine contributed $31,000 to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, $25,000 to the Florida Senate Victory 2004 committee, and $15,000 to Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson‘s campaigns.

Levine also has made direct donations to campaigns of Florida Democrats Dan Gelber, Bill McBride, Janet Reno, Alex Sink, Joe Garcia, Raul Martinez, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Crist [when he ran for Congress as a Democrat,] Peter Deutsch, Betty Castor, Alex Penelas, Andrew Korge, Jose Javier Rodriguez, Katherine Fernandez Rundle, Elaine Bloom, Ken Gottlieb, David Richardson, Richard Steinberg, and Wilbert Holloway.

Besides Rubio, other non-Democrats who received support from Levine include Miami Republican Lincoln Díaz-Balart, who got $250 for his 1998 Congressional re-election campaign; Montana Republican Conrad Burns, who got $1,000 for his 1998 U.S. Senate re-election campaign; and New Jersey Republican Dick Zimmer, who got $1,000 for his 2008 U.S. Senate campaign. Levine also donated to the nonpartisan campaigns of Florida’s 11th Judicial Circuit judges Maxine Cohen Lando and Milton Hirsch.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons