David Jolly Archives - Page 7 of 64 - Florida Politics

League of Conservation Voters to spend $100K more on digital ads vs. David Jolly

The League of Conservation Voters (LCV) on Wednesday announced a new $100,000 digital ad campaign against Florida Congressional District 13 Republican David Jolly, who is battling for re-election against Democrat Charlie Crist.

This is the second time in two weeks the environmental organization has announced they are spending money to try to doom Jolly’s re-election efforts. LCV announced a $200,000 mail campaign last week in the district, which encompasses most of Pinellas County.

The new ad contends Jolly protected “big oil” and gas interests in his previous career as a Washington D.C.-based lobbyist.

“Newly released documents show oil giant Exxon had scientific evidence 40 years ago that climate change is being fueled by carbon pollution, and spent millions covering it up, propping up politicians to block action to protect us,” reads the ad’s voiceover. “The local connection — 13th district Congressman David Jolly. A longtime lobbyist, Jolly is one of the politicians listed taking tens of thousands from oil and gas interests, and voting their way. David Jolly protected big oil. Not us.”

“It’s ironic they spent their first $200K on a message that had nothing to do with the environment,” said Jolly. “Voters recognize a cheap political hit when they see one.”

LCV has named Jolly to their “Dirty Dozen” list, and said he has a record of attacking clean air and water protections. They specifically noted a February 2016 vote against a bill that would designate the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness.

They also noted his vote to overturn President Obama’s Clean Power Plan in December 2015. Other votes that the organization highlighted can be found here.

SPB has reached out to the Jolly camp for comment. You can watch the new digital ad below:

DCCC doctored photo ad becomes comedy fodder for Stephen Colbert

That controversial television ad that photoshopped Pinellas County GOP Congressman David Jolly with Donald Trump made for some fodder on a late night comedy show Tuesday, when “The Late Show’s” Stephen Colbert referred to it during his monologue.

“Democrats couldn’t find any photos tying Jolly to Trump, so they just photoshopped Trump with his arm around Jolly,” Colbert said, showing a still photo from the ad.

“That is not fair, Democrats,” he chided. “With photoshop you can make anyone seem like friends, even Hillary and Bill Clinton!”

The CBS late night talk-show host continued.

“And if you’re going to photoshop somebody, at least make it interesting. Make it a three-way with Trump, Jolly, and the American flag,” with an accompanying photoshopped picture ending the bit.

Jolly is running against Democrat Charlie Crist in Florida’s 13th Congressional District. Unlike some Republicans, Jolly has not endorsed the Republican presidential nominee, and in fact at times has been quite critical of Trump, saying last December that his call for a ban on Muslims was a disqualifying act.

Nevertheless, the Democratic Campaign Congressional Committee ran the ad over the past several weeks, despite calls by Jolly’s team to Crist and to local television stations to pull the ad.

Crist finally opted to do so on Monday, after the Tampa Bay Times editorial page called on him to do so.

Dwight Dudley, activists slam David Jolly; Jolly’s spokeswoman slams Charlie Crist

Outgoing Democratic state Rep. Dwight Dudley and several Pinellas activists gathered Tuesday to call out U.S. Rep. David Jolly for his “failure to stand up for” the people of Congressional District 13.

Dudley and the others gathered in Williams Park, across from Duke Energy, which they accused of “ripping off” consumers.

“Big energy companies like Duke Energy continue to rip off Florida’s working families, over-billing consumers by millions of dollars,” Dudley said. “David Jolly took thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from Duke Energy, and he has stood by silently while they overcharge consumers.”

Dudley added, “David Jolly is comfortable being in the pocket of Duke Energy. This is why he hasn’t spoken up for consumers. His silence in the face of such an outrage is alarming.”

The solution, said Dudley and the others, is to vote for former Gov. Charlie Crist, the Democrat challenging Jolly for the CD 13 seat.

Dudley said Crist has a history of looking out for and protecting Floridians by standing against big utility companies and focusing on clean, renewable energy.

“No wonder Duke Energy has given money to his opponent in this race,” Dudley said. Dudley added that Crist also wants to protect Social Security, not privatize it, as Jolly has advocated.

While Crist’s supporters were holding their press conference — with two Republican Party onlookers — Jolly was unleashing his own barrage in the form of a press release:

“Charlie Crist will today host a press conference in an attempt to tie Congressman David Jolly, Republican candidate for Florida Congressional District 13, to additional energy fees related to the state-regulated energy industry and Congressional Republicans’ plans for Social Security.

“The problem for Charlie is he was the governor who signed into law House Bill 549, in 2007, and House Bill 7135, in 2008. These two pieces of legislation essentially expanded the very program which Crist is now falsely attacking Congressman Jolly. The federal government, for which Congress has jurisdiction, also has no responsibility for nuclear recovery fees.

”In regard to Social Security, Congressman Jolly has continued to oppose privatization, having reiterated that position at a Suncoast Tiger Bay Forum with Crist on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, and has repeatedly voted against Republican budget proposals in Congress to make changes to the program (H.Con.Res.96 and H.Con.Res.27). Additionally, Congressman Jolly has called for Social Security to be guaranteed, despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to the contrary, and has introduced legislation to change the cost-of-living formula for Social Security recipients to better reflect the real rate of inflation for seniors (H.R. 4551, Keeping our Promise to Seniors Act).”

The press release includes quotes from Jolly spokeswoman Sarah Bascom, who calls Crist a liar and says he is using scare tactics.

“Charlie Crist has not had a good week so far,” Bascom said. “First, he gets called out for not denouncing a photoshopped ad by the Democratic Washington establishment until the media tells him to, and conveniently only does so when he knows the ad was cycling off television anyway. But now, he is falsely attacking David Jolly for a bill he supported and for an issue that Congress has no control over. Clearly, they are seeing the closing poll numbers that we are seeing and are getting desperate that they may lose yet another campaign for office — on the heels of two other losses, for two other offices, in which he was a member of two different parties.

“What’s even worse, or perhaps just more disturbing, is that Charlie Crist fails to mention that Congress has no jurisdiction over this matter of nuclear cost recovery. But that does not stop him from lying to the voters in an effort to lob a false attack on his opponent yet again.

“Crist has also been making the scare tactic rounds by echoing claims meant to frighten seniors with claims that their Social Security is threatened. A claim that has been disproved and he knows is false. In a senior-heavy district, this is an all-time low for a man who wants to represent the Pinellas County community.”

Dwight DudleyMatthew WeidnerVince CocksDwight Dudley Winnie Foster

George Soros among the latest donors to Charlie Crist’s congressional campaign

Former Gov. Charlie Crist reported another $27,900 in contributions for his congressional campaign over the weekend, including donations from several high-profile donors.

Among the big names on the donor roll were billionaire George Soros, financial author Howard Dvorkin, Diametriq CEO Anjan Ghosal, Sembler Company executive Craig Sher, FSU trustee Kathryn Ballard, and Avram Glazer, whose family owns the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and controls Manchester United.

The money is the first Crist has reported for his CD 13 race since he filed his report covering Aug. 11 through Sept. 30. At the end of last month, Crist had raised about $1.4 million and had about $775,000 of that money on hand.

Crist is running against incumbent Republican Rep. David Jolly, who got a late start in the race after he dipped his toe into running for Marco Rubio’s seat in the Senate.

Jolly had about $257,000 on hand at the end of September, with about $1.75 million in total fundraising.

CD 13 covers southern Pinellas County and is expected to be one of the closer races on Election Day. Jolly won the seat over former Florida chief financial officer Alex Sink two years ago, though in 2012 President Barack Obama scored a 10-point victory over Mitt Romney in the district.

Mitch Perry Report for 10.25.16 — DCCC ad linking Trump to Jolly goes away, but has the damage been done?

Attention political junkies: not every voter pays attention to politics until right before the election, which is why that ad by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee “dramatizing” David Jolly standing with Donald Trump was so egregious.

The ad — one of the most controversial of any produced this season in American politics — was immediately denounced by the Jolly campaign, who protested to local television stations to stop airing it. They did not. Nor did his Democratic opponent, Charlie Crist, say anything negative when called to denounce it at the time.

But beware the power of the Tampa Bay Times editorial page. On Monday morning, the Times took shots at that ad, and called for Crist to demand his new political party take those dishonest ads off the air. They also criticized other negative ads being aired against Hillsborough County State Attorney Mark Ober and state Senate District 18 Democratic candidate Bob Buesing.

After reading the editorial, Crist did as the Times demanded and called on the DCCC to drop the ad. In his own words, Crist said he was “moved” by the Times editorial, and expressed contrition that he hadn’t asked the DCCC to take it down earlier.

But the damage has been done, and Jolly wasn’t “moved” by Charlie’s about-face.

“I’ll be blunt: Charlie is a liar, always has been,” Jolly said. “Charlie’s opportunity to be moved was two weeks ago when he was confronted at Eckerd College about the ad and he claimed the First Amendment.”

The question that maybe we’ll never know is: how many voters on the fence in the 13th Congressional District were undecided about this congressional race, but are turned off by Trump and thus were persuaded not to scribble in the circle next to Jolly’s name on the ballot in Pinellas County?

The fact is, we can’t allow any candidate or third-party group in the future to allow for such “dramatizations.” They’re outright lies, and there’s already enough of that on an everyday basis in our politics, and in our campaign ads. Faking pictures is going to a new low, and while it may not be illegal, it shouldn’t be allowed.

In other news …

Donald Trump returned to Tampa last night. We hung out with some of his supporters before he came on the stage.

Hillary Clinton returns to Tampa for her fourth time this year on Wednesday.

Marco Rubio began his Monday in Sun City Center, where he added “liberal” to the other epithets he’s been throwing at Democratic Senate opponent Patrick Murphy.

The Hillsborough County Republican Party recently gave a $1,000 contribution to the lone Republican in the Tampa City Council District 7 race, Jim Davison. However, according to the City of Tampa’s charter regarding nonpartisan races, that’s a no-no.

HART has received $1 million to study a driverless bus in the county.

And what happens if Hillary Clinton wins in November, and Barack Obama passes the TPP in December? Chaos in the Democratic Party? Local guy Frank Sanchez agrees with Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn on supporting the TPP, for what that’s worth.

New poll shows Charlie Crist with 3-point lead over David Jolly, but will unforced errors do him in?

First, the good news for Charlie Crist.

A new St. Pete Polls survey shows that the Democrat is maintaining his lead in the race for Florida’s 13th Congressional District over Republican David Jolly.

The bad news is that this lead is a narrow three points, giving him little margin for error during the final two weeks of the campaign.

But unforced errors seem to be something the Crist campaign can’t avoid lately.

Crist leads Jolly 48 to 45 percent with CD 13 voters. Two weeks ago, Crist was at 48 percent and Jolly was at 43 percent, so not much has changed. Voters in the district prefer Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump for president, 48 to 46 percent. In other words, the top of the ballot and down-ballot are in sync.

At this point, Crist has to be hoping to run out the clock. Two tempests in teapots are brewing in this high-profile race.

The first was Crist’s decision to skip a candidate forum on Saturday noted by the St. Petersburg branch of the NAACP. Crist is drawing fire from longtime critic Leslie Wimes, who notes that instead of attending this event (like Jolly did) Crist was putting up signs through the district.

“If he can’t bother to show up for us, why on earth would we show up for him?” Wimes asks.

Not watering the flowers at the NAACP seems like an unforced error that could have been avoided by Crist dropping in at the event, shaking hands with everyone in the room, and then asking who wanted to join him putting out signs.

The second — and probably more damaging — issue for Crist is the ad sponsored by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee juxtaposing Jolly with Donald Trump.

The ad drew criticism from the Tampa Bay Times editorial board over the weekend, saying it should be pulled because Jolly has never met Trump and has said he won’t vote for him for president.

After this editorial— and two weeks after the ad first aired — Crist called the DCCC and asked it to pull the spot.

“I wish I’d done it sooner,” Crist told the Tampa Bay Times’ Charlie Frago. “I was moved.”

Crist saying he’s been moved by an editorial reads like intellectual embezzlement. He should have called for the ad to be taken down two weeks or not at all. This unforced error will only serve to breathe life into Jolly’s campaign, which is running on fumes.

Crist played football in college. It’s time for him to dust off the playbook and run the ball until clock hits zero.

5 things I think I think about today’s Tampa Bay Times

Back before there was a FloridaPolitics.com and it was just me blogging at SaintPetersBlog.com, I would write a semi-regular screed about the Tampa Bay Times’ political coverage. This was so long ago, the Times still had St. Petersburg in its masthead.

I gave up the “5 things I think I think…” column after a while because it got repetitive. (And because so many of my favorite writers — Howard Troxler, Eric Deggans, Michael Kruse —  left the newspaper). However, with 15 days left before the election, it’s as good a time as any to check in on what the Times has to offer.

Unfortunately, it’s not much. At least as far as the print product is concerned. There’s some good and interesting stuff about national and state politics, but when it comes to the local scene, the pickings are slim.

There are only two Sundays left before Election Day and there isn’t a story in the newspaper about the high-profile congressional race in the region (Republican David Jolly vs. Democrat Charlie Crist) or the high-profile state Senate race in the region (Republican Dana Young vs. Democrat Bob Buesing and independent Joe Redner). Nothing on any of the state House races, although most of them are snoozers. Nothing on the county commission race between Republican Mike Mikurak and Democrat Charlie Justice.

Like I said, not much.

No wonder Adam Smith has to write about how “the dreaded campaign yard sign appears to be less in demand this season.”

Really, that’s the best the political editor of the state’s largest newspaper has to offer two weeks out from an election? Other than quotes from good guys Brian Burgess and Nick Hansen, this story is even sillier than you might think. It’s as if because Smith doesn’t see any yard signs in his tony Old Northeast neighborhood, there are no yard signs anywhere!

Smith blames The Case of the Missing Yard Signs on “most voters disliking the major presidential nominees too much to want to boast about their choice.” But since when were presidential campaigns even known for having a strong yard sign program? It’s the local campaigns, with their tighter budgets, which rely more on yard signs. And in Smith’s St. Petersburg neighborhood there aren’t as many competitive down-ballot races as there have been in recent election cycles.

Where Smith lives, there aren’t bruising races for state Senate, state House, county commission, or school board as there were in 2012 and 2014. So maybe Smith’s headline should have been “Adored by candidates, the dreaded campaign yard sign appears to be less in demand IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD.”

Ah, the good ol’ days of making fun of Adam Smith‘s work. It’s 2013 all over again. No wonder yellow-bellied Adam won’t participate in a post-election panel with me at the Tampa Tiger Bay club.

Actually, Smith has a must-read piece fronting the newspaper about Hillary Clinton’s connections to the Sunshine State and his “Winner and Loser of the Week in Florida politics” (consultant Rick Wilson is the winner; Broward elections supervisor Brenda Snipes is the loser) is spot on.

Other thoughts about today’s newspaper:

Months after both Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio were dispatched from the presidential election by Donald Trump, their names still sit atop the Times’ website when you click on the 2016 CAMPAIGN under the POLITICS link.

jebio

I agree with half of what John Romano tries to say about how “Rick Scott might have held the key to an outsider’s successful bid to the White House” because the columnist echoes some of what I’ve recently written about Scott; namely that Scott is under-appreciated as a political force. But where Romano and I diverge is with his thesis that Trump should have relied on the same message-driven playbook that worked for Scott in 2010. To suggest this ignores The Donald aspect of Donald Trump, which is what has propelled him to where he is today.

With Trump, there’s no way to separate the messenger from the message. This can be accomplished with Scott because he was a blank slate before he arrived on the political scene. Trump was already a brand.

Still, Romano’s column is worth the read.

 The Times’ final mission for the 2016 election cycle is to take down the utility industry-backed Amendment 1. The newspaper, of course, will write about Clinton vs. Trump and Marco Rubio’s re-election campaign, but it can’t influence those races. It can be a factor in whether Amendment 1 passes, so look for it to flood the zone — as it does today with not one, not two, but three Amendment 1 related punches, including this editorial.

Such good questions prompted by Charlie Frago’s reporting of how the City of St. Petersburg “experienced the equivalent of an air-raid siren warning about its impending sewage crisis.” Unfortunately, no one at City Hall is talking.

“I have no recollection of that event,” says Bill Foster, the mayor at the time. … Council members who served at that time also had never heard of it.

Former public works administrator Mike Connors, who was there when the Albert Whitted plant was closed in 2015, has retired. Water resources director Steve Leavitt and engineering director Tom Gibson were placed on unpaid leave while the city investigates what happened to the 2014 report, which was brought to light by a whistleblower.

Gibson and Connors declined to comment. Leavitt could not be reached for comment.

Even if any of these people did comment, it would not answer this question: who tipped off Frago to the 10.5 million-gallon discharge in 2013?

Pay attention to Susan Taylor Martin’s reporting about the 400 block of Central Avenue and whether it should be redeveloped into a residential property or into commercial space. Ten years from now, the 400 block could be the most important piece of non-waterfront property in the city, but only if the right decisions about its future are made now.

This was fun, critiquing the Times’ political coverage. Maybe it’s time to relaunch this series …

David Jolly doubles down on attacking ‘Chain Gang Charlie’ Crist in new digital ad

In the first prime-time debate against Charlie Crist in Florida’s 13th Congressional District race, David Jolly pulled out what he thought was a potent arrow in his quiver.

When the debate moderators allowed the candidates to ask a question of one another, Jolly spoke dramatically about how in 1995, Crist traveled to Alabama to inspect an actual chain gang. Crist’s tough anti-crime stance back at the beginning of his career in the state Legislature had earned him the nickname,”Chain Gang Charlie.”

“You stood there, over three African-American prisoners in chains, on their knees, on the side of the road,” Jolly said. “Saying that it was a great sight. Saying we needed to bring it to Florida. And you did this — whether you know or not — on the eve of Juneteenth, the day the African-American community celebrates the end of slavery.”

How would Crist react?

After explaining he supported chain gangs because of the high crime rate in the state (as it was nationally two decades ago), Crist turned the tables on Jolly, saying the idea that his tough-on-crime stance had anything to do with race was simply “appalling.”

Issue defused? It was at the time, but Jolly brings it back in a new digital ad called, “No Mercy.”

Watch below:

Barack Obama cuts an ad for Charlie Crist in CD 13 race

President Barack Obama has cut a television commercial for Congressional District 13 candidate Charlie Crist, in which he says the people of Pinellas County “have an opportunity this year to elect a public servant who always put the people first.”

“As governor, he worked with both parties to get things done,” the president adds in the commercial, as the visuals show Crist meeting with local residents. The ad superimposes graphics that say he’ll protect Social Security and Medicare, defend women’s health care and Planned Parenthood, and take care of military veterans.

“Charlie needs your vote. Please stand with him. I know he’ll stand by you,” the president concludes.

Recent polls have shown Crist to be leading Republican incumbent David Jolly in the contest.

An internal poll released by the Jolly camp to the Tampa Bay Times last week showed Crist up by two percentage points, while others range from five to 18 points in Crist’s favor.

Mitch Perry Report for 10.18.16 — Amy Schumer not the 1st libe

Amy Schumer isn’t the only major comic whose liberal schtick ended up alienating some Tampa residents who coughed up big money for a night’s entertainment.

In 2003 Bill Maher gave an eviscerating takedown of George W. Bush at the Straz Theatre (still known then simply as the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center). It was just months after the “successful” invasion of Iraq. It was well before things went truly south for the U.S. and western forces there, and in our popular culture, seldom was heard a discouraging word about the fight, sold in part as addressing the wounds of 9/11.

A dozen or so people left the theater during Maher’s takedown. Although his attack on Bush wasn’t really anything new, it definitely alienated some of the citizens who had come out on a Friday night for a few laughs. Apparently they didn’t get HBO.

Meanwhile, Patrick Murphy and Marco Rubio finally engaged in their first one-on-one debate last night from Orlando. It was pretty good stuff, after moderator Jonathan Karl got finished asking all of his nationally based questions about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Actually, it wasn’t Karl’s fault. Like so many Democrats in Tampa Bay, Florida and around the nation, Murphy is trying to conflate Rubio with Trump on a daily basis.

So Murphy kept on bringing up Rubio’s refusal to disassociate himself from the GOP presidential nominee, though Rubio was certainly critical of him.

Some reporters say the “news” out of the debate was that, for the first time, Rubio said he would serve a full, six-year term, “God willing.” I’d argue Rubio’s declaration that the Florida presidential election results will not be “rigged,” was pretty newsworthy, since it’s important for fellow Republicans to denounce the idea that the general election results are already fixed.

I mean, if that’s going to happen, why even campaign for another three weeks?

In other news …

Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal was in Tampa yesterday, where he said the No. 1 vulnerability of the U.S. government in terms of international relations is our political divisions at home.

Tampa Republican state Rep. Dana Young is calling for the FDLE to investigate the Hillsborough County PTC, following revelations of questionable moves made last week by embattled executive director Kyle Cockream.

And the DCCC is rubbing it in when it comes to that whole dubious ad they produced where they photoshopped David Jolly into appearing with Donald Trump.

With three weeks to go, the majority of those polled in the Tampa City Council District 7 area admit to having no clue, but Republican Jim Davison is blowing away the field among those who can name a candidate in that race.

Tampa Bay area religious leaders are calling on Hillsborough County State Attorney Mark Ober and Pinellas County State Attorney Bernie McCabe to stop prosecuting death penalty cases.

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