President Obama Archives - Page 5 of 32 - Florida Politics

Mitch Perry Report for 7.8.16 — America in crisis

The world awoke to the news this morning that five police officers in Dallas were killed at a police protest last night, with another six wounded. It’s the worst attack on law enforcement officers since 9/11. As I write this morning, CBS News reports that there were three, and maybe four, snipers involved. There’s been no other information reported on them at this point.

Dallas Police Chief David O. Brown said the officers were shot by two snipers in “elevated positions” near the protests and said the department believes the attackers coordinated the ambush. “How would you know to post up there?” he said, referring to the elevated position the snipers were in.

“We have yet to determine whether or not there was some complicity with the planning of this, but we will be pursuing that.”

In Warsaw, Poland, President Barack Obama called the shootings a “vicious, calculated and despicable attack on law enforcement.”

The incident comes after the two shooting deaths of black men in suburban St. Paul and Baton Rouge earlier this week by the police, and has led many in the black community to say they are sick and tired of such incidents continuing to occur in this country.

The Washington Post reports this morning the number of fatal shootings by officers has increased from 465 in the first six months of last year to 491 for the same period this year. They also report this year has also seen more officers shot and killed in the line of duty and more officers prosecuted for questionable shootings.

One of the things that seems to be a consensus is there needs to be more police training. The Post reports while police chiefs around the nation have embraced such reforms, with 18,000 police departments in the country, many have their own training academies and unions, “making it impossible for them to move in lockstep.”

One of the legislative reforms that has come out of the police shootings in 2014 was the increase in body cameras for officers. However, the footage in Baton Rouge and suburban St. Paul from cellphones this week shows that the number of instances of deadly force haven’t been reduced at all.

In other news …

Today is the deadline for two media organizations in Florida who say they’re waiting on Patrick Murphy on whether or not they will hold a U.S. Senate primary debate before voters go to the polls at the end of next month.

Murphy, incidentally, raised more than $2 million in the past three months in his bid for the Senate.

Marco Rubio joined nine other GOP senators early yesterday in calling for Secretary of State John Kerry to deny Hillary Clinton and her top aides access to national security information, following Jim Comey‘s statement Tuesday that she was “reckless” in handling classified material.

The Tampa Bay Times investigative editor, Chris Davis, has earned a promotion. He’s now leading the investigative team at USA Today.

Avis Harrison becomes the sixth candidate (and first woman) to enter the Tampa City Council election to succeed Lisa Montelione.

Tim Canova has raised more than $2.25 million in his insurgent campaign against DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

House District 61 Democratic candidates in Tampa discuss their financial disclosure forms.

Mitch Perry Report for 7.5.16 — Bernie Sanders says the DNC’s platform still needs work

The Democratic Party platform’s most recent draft was published Friday, and is ready for your reading enjoyment, before it’s reviewed and ultimately approved this coming weekend in Orlando.

With Bernie Sanders‘ only leverage these days to exert as much of his influence as possible on this hallowed document, it is instructive to learn the Bernster thinks it’s a good start but needs more work, according to a piece he wrote on the Philadelphia Inquirer’s website Sunday.

On the issue of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Democrats have a bit of a problem. That’s because their leader, Barack Obama, is 100 percent behind it, as are a number of Democrats.

Hillary Clinton used to be one of those Democrats, but no longer, undoubtedly pushed to oppose something she formerly called a “model” agreement by Sanders. Donald Trump rails against it daily as well, but the language in the platform says only there are “a diversity of views in the party.”

Sanders doesn’t understand that, since both he and Hillary oppose it. “If both Clinton and I agree that the TPP should not get to the floor of Congress this year, it’s hard to understand why an amendment saying so would not be overwhelmingly passed,” he writes, forgetting about Obama’s stance on the issue.

On the minimum wage, the DNC says they do support calls for raising it to $15, but support what Governors [Jerry] Brown in California and [Andrew] Cuomo in New York have proposed — doing it incrementally, year-by-year.

On Social Security, the platform calls for taxing “some of the income of people above $250,000.”

Regarding Wall Street, the platform says “we acknowledged that there is room within our party for a diversity of views on a broader financial transaction tax.”

On campaign finance, the platform calls for reversing not only 2010’s Citizens United decision, but also the 1976 Buckley v. Valeo decision, which equated speech with money.

Bernie’s thoughts on the rest?

“We need to have very clear language that raises the minimum wage to $15 an hour, ensures that the promised pensions of millions of Americans will not be cut, establishes a tax on carbon, and creates a ban on fracking,” he writes. Currently, there is no ban on fracking, nor anything at all about a carbon tax.

Sanders says amendments on those items will be introduced in Orlando, so stay tuned.

In other news …

Well, the only thing we’ve reported on since last week was the fact that Tampa City Councilman Frank Reddick has endorsed Betty Reed in Senate District 19 race, which may move some votes Ms. Reed’s way.

 

Martin Dyckman: With ‘colossal liar’ Donald Trump, nightmares could become reality

Donald Trump has audacious proposals to wall off Mexico and bar Muslim immigrants, but he hasn’t said how he would stop people from sneaking around the barriers or overstaying visas.

How might he manage that? Let’s surmise one way.

He could be planning to implant every lawful resident with an identification chip like those the veterinarian offers to your dog or cat. The process is relatively painless and doesn’t cost much.

Newborns and legitimate visitors would be first. Others would have their turn in order to renew their drivers’ licenses, receive a tax refund, or show up to vote. Strategically placed surveillance devices would detect people without chips to be held for questioning.

“We have no choice,” he would say.

Stop. Roll back. This is fiction. I have absolutely no evidence that anything of the sort has occurred even to Trump. Identity chips have been the fantasy only of some folks on the far right who enjoy suspecting that their own government is out to get them.

They’re probably huge Trump fans. They’re susceptible to believing anything bad about their country’s leadership, and that’s what he trades on.

They’d better be careful, though. With Trump, one of their nightmares could become reality.

As Trump himself would say, who knows?

Stop. Roll back. I say again, this is fiction.

But it’s no more false, fanciful or outrageous than the paranoid fables that Trump persistently passes off as casually as you or I might say, “How’s it going today?”

After the slaughter at Orlando, Trump had the gall to imply that President Obama was somehow responsible.

Proof?

“There’s something going on,” Trump said.

That’s not proof.

He prepared for his campaign by flogging the birther nonsense even after all but a few certifiable lunatics had accepted the redundant evidence of Barack Obama’s native-born citizenship.

He has been digging into his party’s dry-as-dust Benghazi well by charging that Hillary Clinton was asleep rather than answering the phone when the American consulate was under attack. That’s a takeoff on her campaign question, “Who do you want in the White House when the phone rings at 3 a.m.?”

The trouble with Trump’s attempt to exploit Benghazi in that regard is that while the assault took place at nighttime in Libya, it was full daylight in the United States. The secretary of state was not napping. After verifying that she was in her Washington office, PolitiFact rated Trump’s claim “false.”

Pressed repeatedly on the insinuation, Trump finally admitted on NBC News that it might not be true.

“It happened all during the day and was going on for a long period of time — it was going on for a long period of time and she was asleep at the wheel, whether she was sleeping or not, who knows if she was sleeping?” he said.

Who knows?

If such speculative claptrap is legitimate politicking, here are a few other possibilities:

Is Trump insane?

Who knows?

Does he maintain a secret harem somewhere?

Who knows?

Does he have a fortune stashed in Russian banks, and is that why he’s refusing to divulge his income tax returns?

Who knows?

Trump continues to remind us that the Republican Party is about to nominate, for the most important office in the world, someone who doesn’t care even in the slightest whether there’s any truth to what he says.

He is a deliberate liar who’s as eager to deceive everyone in the same way he took advantage of people expecting to learn something useful from the so-called Trump University. The lesson that most learned was to not be swindled again.

And when Trump accuses Clinton of being the most corrupt presidential candidate ever, she must know what it’s like to be called ugly by a frog. Trump should look in the mirror.

He is as corrupt, if not more so, than any individual who has ever run for any office in the United States.

To tell lies and willfully repeat them after they have been exposed is a profound form of corruption.

To lure hard-working Americans into seminars on the premise that they will learn to be rich and then stiff them for ever-costlier upgrades they can’t afford is a profound form of corruption.

To habitually take corporations into bankruptcy, enriching oneself while leaving creditors and investors with little or nothing, is corruption. Giving him the benefit of the doubt, once can be the failure of good intentions. But at the old saying goes, “Fool me once, your fault. Fool me twice, my fault.”

The presidency of the United States — the leadership of the free world — is not on the order of a gambling casino or a golf course. We don’t dare be fooled even once.

Especially not by so colossal a liar as Donald Trump.

___

Martin Dyckman is a retired associate editor of the newspaper now known as the Tampa Bay Times. He lives in suburban Asheville, North Carolina.

 

Latino Victory Fund and Priorities USA to run digital ads in Florida targeting Republicans on immigration lawsuit

Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s deadlocking on a case challenging President Obama’s executive orders on immigration, two advocacy groups announced Thursday they would target Republicans in Florida and two other states in a new digital ad.

Latino Victory Fund and Priorities USA say they will launch a five-figure digital ad buy “holding Republican politicians accountable for bringing on this politically motivated lawsuit, and refusing to do their constitutional duty and consider the President’s nomination to replace Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.”

The Latino Victory Fund is the super PAC of the Latino Victory Project — a nonpartisan organization devoted to supporting Latino candidates and increasing turnout of Latino voters. Priorities USA is the leading super PAC backing presumptive Democratic presidential Hillary Clinton.

The U.S. Supreme Court failed to decide on the lawsuit filed by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and other attorneys general that challenged President’s Obama executive action on immigration that would have shielded as many as five million undocumented immigrants from being deported. It’s being described as a major blow to his ambitions to achieve immigration reform, which stalled legislatively in 2013 when House Speaker John Boeher refused to bring a Senate bill up for a vote.

Obama’s executive action would have allowed five million unauthorized immigrants who are the parents of citizens or of lawful permanent residents to apply for a called Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents, or DAPA, that would have have shielded them from deportation orders. It also would have expanded  the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

A coalition of 26 states, led by Texas but joined by Florida, challenged the plan, accusing Obama of ignoring administrative procedures for changing rules and of abusing the power of his office by circumventing Congress.

Immigration activists were unhappy about the ruling.

“We are outraged, saddened and disappointed in the Supreme Court’s inability to come to a decision. But the fight isn’t over yet, this lawsuit was nothing but a partisan political attack against our families, and the outcome is a reflection of Senate Republicans’ refusal to do their constitutional duty and consider President Obama’s nominee to replace Justice Antonin Scalia,” said César J. Blanco, Latino Victory Fund interim director. “We will hold these Republican politicians accountable come November. The choice is ours, we must elect pro-immigrant candidates up and down the ballot, and elect Hillary Clinton as president — only she can, and will, protect our families and fight to ensure the well being and prosperity of our community and our loved ones.”

“DACA and DAPA would help millions of young people pursue their dreams,” said Justin Barasky, communications director for Priorities USA . “Today’s unfortunate news is why it’s so important to elect Hillary Clinton president so she can fight for immigrant families and ensure everyone has the opportunity to live in peace and prosperity.”

“Today’s ruling by our nation’s highest court left standing the position of Florida and the 25 other states challenging the President’s attempt to circumvent the separation of powers and act unilaterally to change the law,” Bondi said a statement. “The powers granted to the President are expressly written in the United States Constitution to guard against presidential overreach.”

 

 

Charlie Crist endorsed by President Obama in CD 13 contest

President Obama endorsed Charlie Crist in his race for Congress in Florida’s 13th District.

“Gov. Charlie Crist has always put people above politics — and we need more of that in Washington,” said Obama on a statement issued on Monday. “As governor, in the face of partisan attacks, he had the courage to save jobs and lead his state into economic recovery. He had the wisdom to recognize that climate change is real and act to fight it. And he had the decency to expand, not restrict, our right to vote. I know he’ll bring the people’s voice to Congress, and I’ve got his back.”

Crist’s literal embrace of Obama when the president traveled to Lee County back in the spring of 2009 became one of the most famous hugs in recent political times, as Republicans used it against the former governor when he unsuccessfully for Senate back in 2010, losing out to Marco Rubio.

“I’m humbled and honored that President Obama, one of the greatest leaders in our nation’s history, has my back,” said Crist. “Outside of the voters of Pinellas County, no endorsement means more to me. He’s done so much for our beautiful Florida — guiding us out of the recession, and working for greater equality, opportunity, and prosperity. He’s a great friend.”

While the endorsement is a nice pickup for Crist, it’s not unexpected now that he is running unopposed in the Democratic primary on Aug. 30.

Another move Florida Republicans criticized Crist for when he was governor was when he extended early voting hours in 2008 when Democrats, especially African-Americans, turned out in unprecedented numbers for President Obama, many of them waiting hours in line to cast a vote.

After he ran as an independent in 2010 and left the Republican Party, Crist was invited to give a speech touting Obama’s record at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte in 2012. A few months later at a visit to the White House, he officially announced he had become a Democrat.

Crist is now engaged in what could be an intense battle for the CD 13 seat in Florida, with GOP incumbent David Jolly re-entering the race last Friday. Two private polls made public Monday show the race is extremely competitive.

A Public Policy Polling survey has Crist up by three points, while a survey done by McLaughlin & Associates has Jolly up by 12 percentage points over Crist.

President Obama cuts radio ad for Patrick Murphy

Democrats nationally are putting all their chips on Patrick Murphy in the U.S. Senate contest this year, and none other than President Barack Obama is featured in a new radio ad that will begin airing today throughout the Sunshine State, promoting the Jupiter Representative.

“In Congress, I could always count on Patrick to have my back. He’s been there for me when I needed him,” Obama says in the ad, paid for by the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee.

The President touts Murphy’s support for Social Security and Medicare, gun control, and the Affordable Care Act in the ad.

“Now I need Patrick Murphy in the Senate,” he says, “to create good-paying jobs, make sure corporations pay their fair share, and grow an economy that works for all of us, with equal pay for equal work.”

Obama and Vice President Joe Biden announced their support for Murphy in March, taking sides in the Democratic Primary, where Murphy is running against Orlando area Congressman Alan Grayson and former Navy JAG officer Pam Keith.

Listen below:

Tampa women attend White House’s United State of Women Summit

On Tuesday, 5,000 women from around the country came to the White House for the United State of Women conference, where they heard from a series of big-time speakers, such as President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, first lady Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey, among others.

On the agenda were topics from violence and rape culture, to the wage gap and absence of educational opportunities for women around the world.

One of the major initiatives is the new White House Equal Pay Pledge, through which companies promise to conduct an annual gender pay analysis and reassess their hiring and promoting processes to ensure equity.

Among those in attendance were Tampa’s own Brunelda Montoya and Nadaije Paul Jajoute.

Both women are child care workers involved in the “Fight for 15!” movement coordinated by the Florida Service Employees International Union that is pushing for a raise in the wages of fast food workers, health home care workers, child care workers and adjunct professors.

Paul Jajoute said of all the high profile personalities at the event, it was Julie Hanna, the board chair for Kiva, the peer-to-peer lending pioneer and the world’s largest crowd lending marketplace for global entrepreneurs, was the most inspiring.

“They give out loans, not through banks, not through wealthy financial people, private investors, it’s to people like me and you, ” she said. “Anyone who wants to can donate money, and you chose where you want that money (to go). Anyone in the world can be a borrower, anyone can be a lender, and what was so amazing about this it shows how women about the community that they’re in.”

Paul Jajoute also said she was blown away by Biden’s speech, which addressed rape culture in the U.S. “It affected my heart so deeply,” she said. “It was amazing.”

“Those of us who find this action reprehensible, the talk reprehensible, you have to be heard,” Biden told the gathering. “You are the ones who are going to impact the change in the culture.”

“Most inspiring was that the government knows what we are going through right now, and are taking the initiative to try to change things,” said Montoya about the summit. “It has to start from the top.”

Montoya and Paul Jajoute are childcare workers, and don’t make earn much. Both have been doing the same work for decades, and Paul Jajoute said she still only makes $9.50 an hour.

“It was overwhelming and surprisingly way better than I thought it was going to be,” said Paul Jajoute. “It gave me a lot of hope. It surprised me; it made me want to keep going. I felt that there was still love in the world.”

 

Rick Scott says money set aside for Orlando efforts

Gov. Rick Scott announced Wednesday state agencies were setting aside millions of dollars for the Orlando area in the wake of Sunday’s mass shooting at a gay nightclub there.

Also Wednesday, his office revealed Scott and President Obama finally had a one-on-one phone conversation in advance of the president’s scheduled Thursday visit to the area.

In a press release, Scott’s office said the Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) “set aside more than $520,000 in residual Justice Assistance Grant funds for the City of Orlando and Orange County to be used for overtime pay for law enforcement and equipment associated with the terror attack.”

The department also asked for “$2 million in emergency funds from the Department of Justice to help with similar costs.”

The Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) also is “directing $500,000 in funding to local providers for crisis counseling services which include grief counseling, trauma support, and emotional support for victims and their families and loved ones,” the release said.

“We will continue to do all we can to help Orlando heal, and our state agencies are doing everything possible to provide assistance to those impacted by this horrific tragedy,” Scott said.

At around 3 p.m., his press office released a revised daily schedule for the governor, who is still in Orlando, showing he and Obama spoke on the phone at 12:40 p.m.

Scott had previously complained the president had not reached out to him directly after the shooting, which claimed 49 lives.

Spokeswoman Jackie Schutz said the president “expressed his condolences” in the roughly five-minute call.

Scott also followed up on his request for a federal emergency declaration and was told the Obama administration is “still reviewing it,” she said. Such a declaration would authorize up to $5 million in aid from federal agencies.

Mitch Perry Report for 6.8.16 — Common Cause Florida calls for Pam Bondi to come clean

There are now calls for an independent investigation into Pam Bondi‘s decision not to investigate consumer complaints against Trump University, the for-profit education company created by Donald Trump that ran a real estate training program from 2005 until at least 2010 — and not just from Democrats.

“Attorney General Pam Bondi owes Floridians a full accounting of her office’s investigation of fraud allegations against Trump University and her acceptance of a $25,000 campaign contribution from a Trump-backed charity,” said Liza McClenaghan, chair of Florida Common Cause. “If she can’t provide it — immediately — Gov. Rick Scott should appoint an independent investigator to do so.”

After several days of reports about Bondi’s office deciding not to pursue charges, coming around the time she received a $25,000 check from a Trump foundation in 2013, the Tampa native finally spoke out last night, saying that her office was never investigating Trump U.

The Associated Press reported on Monday that Bondi had “nixed” suing Trump. A spokesman for the AG has said that their office received “few complaints” about Trump U, and opted to let it go and allow the investigation by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman be the lead agent for disgruntled Trump U customers around the nation.

Although this story has been in the news for months (after Bondi endorsed Trump in Tampa back in March), it was Orlando Sentinel columnist Scott Maxwell‘s recent piece that put it back on the front pages.

Maxwell received more than 8,400 pages of information from Bondi’s office on anything related to Trump U — he read by combing through the documents that in fact there had been 100 complaints from Floridians against the business.

Damningly, he also found that nobody in Bondi’s office seemed very interested in following up on those complaints.

And yes, this all happened at the same time that Bondi had requested and received that $25,000 contribution.

Bondi’s statement last night denied her office was ever investigating Trump U — that it’s inaccurate to say that it was, and the inference that the financial contribution to her made her office turn course is terribly inaccurate. So I guess the first question I would ask at a news conference is — why is it that you’re so quick to jump on lawsuits going after President Obama regarding the Clean Power act, the Affordable Care Act, or immigration, but not on a consumer affairs issue that affected your constituents?

In other news…

GOP Senate candidate Carlos Beruff visited Cuba in 2011 with members of a group actively trying to end the economic embargo against the Communist island.

An activist group is blasting Marco Rubio for blocking a Barack Obama judicial appointee — and someone initially commended by the Florida senator himself.

Kathy Castor decides to endorse early in a Tampa City Council election that officially hasn’t been declared yet.

Dwight Dudley can’t endorse since the state house Democrat is running for the judiciary in Pinellas County, but his wife can — and has .

An angry Rich Nugent is upset about a Daniel Webster mailer that depicts him and Webster together, saying it implies that he’s endorsing Webster when in fact he’s backing opponent Justin Grabelle.

If you’re interested in giving the Tampa Police Dept. feedback regarding, well anything, you’ve got two more chances this week to do so.

 

Donald Trump urges Marco Rubio to re-enter race for Florida’s U.S. Senate seat

Donald Trump is pushing for Marco Rubio to re-enter the U.S. Senate seat he is scheduled to depart in January.

In a tweet sent Thursday evening, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee called on his former bitter rival to get back into the contest.

Trump’s statement is just the latest indication of how concerned Republicans are that they are increasingly concerned about the fate of the 2016 senate race, where no Republican has broken out of the pact despite months of campaigning.

Democrats (including President Obama and Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid) have put all their chips behind Jupiter Representative Patrick Murphy in his primary against Orlando area Congressman Alan Grayson. But Murphy has been suffering from a surfeit of negative news coverage over the past few weeks, yet none of the Republicans appear as of yet to be poised to take advantage of his vulnerabilities.

Top GOP senators on Capitol Hill aren’t being very subtle in calling on Rubio to get back into the race.

“Marco Rubio is a very valuable member of the Senate … and earlier this afternoon, I strongly encouraged him to reconsider his decision and seek re-election,” Tennessee Senator Bob Corker said Thursday.

And CNN quoted Mississippi Senator Roger Wicker,  chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, as saying that the prospect of Rubio running for re-election is “certainly within the realm of possibility.”

“It is a very real development,” Wicker added.
Rubio again repeated on Thursday that it is “unlikely” that he’ll get back into the contest, which has led some to speculate that such a statement gives him some wiggle room to get back into the contest. But that would seem unlikely with his all but official endorsement of his friend and political ally, Florida Lieutenant Carlos Lopez-Cantera.
Rubio announced his candidacy for president 15 months ago in Miami. He said at that time that he would not run for reelection. That was different than Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, who like Rubio was elected in the Tea Party surge of 2010. He has steadfastly maintained that he would not get back into the contest. Paul is running for reelection to maintain his seat this year.
In addition to Lopez-Cantera, the other GOP candidates include congressmen David Jolly and Ron DeSantis, former military veteran and defense contractor Todd Wilcox, and private developer Carlos Beruff.
The bitter fissure between the Rubio and Trump appears to be ending, as the party begins to embrace their new and unlikely standard bearer.
On Thursday, Rubio said in a CNN interview with Jake Tapper that, if asked, he would speak on Trump’s behalf at the Republican National Convention in July. “Certainly, yeah. I want to be helpful,” Rubio told Tapper.
Rubio  still has time – the deadline to enter the contest is June 24.
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