Staff Reports, Author at Florida Politics

Staff Reports

Tripp Scott could earn $225K in Q2

Tripp Scott PA’s work on behalf of charter schools this legislative session likely helped boost the bottom line.

The firm’s government affairs team of Edward Pozzuoli, Lindsey Raphael, James Scott, and Corey Staniscia earned at least $201,000 — an average of $103,000 for legislative work and $98,000 for executive branch work — during the second quarter of 2017.

The lobby team could earn a maximum of $225,995 — a maximum of $117,997 for legislative work and $107,998 for executive branch work — during the second quarter, year, according to an analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

The team’s top paying client, both for legislative and executive branch work during the three-month period, was Charter Schools USA. The Fort Lauderdale-based charter school company paid the firm $58,000 for legislative work during the second quarter of 2017. It paid the same sum for executive branch services during the same time period.

Records show other top legislative clients during the second quarter were B&L Transportation, which paid an average of $25,000; Broward County, which paid an average of $15,000; and The Balmoral Condominium Association, which paid an average of $5,000 for legislative services.

B&L Transportation and Broward County were among the firm’s top-paying executive branch clients during the second quarter, paying an average of $25,000 and $15,000 respectively.

All told, Tripp Scott has seven legislative and seven executive branch clients.

Paul Hawkes could report Q2 earnings of more than $249K

The second quarter proved to be a busy one for Paul Hawkes.

Hawkes had a roster of 16 legislative and 13 executive branch clients helped him bring at least $130,00 — $75,000 for legislative work and $55,000 for executive branch work — during the three-month period.

He could earn a maximum of $249,977 — a maximum of $139,988 for legislative work and a maximum of $109,989 for executive work — during the second quarter, according to analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com.

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

Elite DNA Therapy Services clocked in as Hawkes’ top paying client, paying an average of $15,000 for legislative work during the three-month period.

Eleven other clients — the Bradford County School Board, Dixie County School Board, Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers, the Florida Medical Association, the Florida State University Foundation, Government Services Group, Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida, Shands Jacksonville Medical Center, The Stronach Group, Taylor County School Board, and Watershed Technologies — paid Hawkes an average of $5,000 for legislative work in the second quarter of 2017.

Steve Bannon leaving White House

White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving his White House post.

That’s according to two people familiar with the decision who demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss private conversations.

Bannon was a key adviser to President Donald Trump’s general election campaign and has been a forceful but contentious presence in a divided White House.

The former leader of conservative Breitbart News pushed Trump to follow through with his campaign promises. But he’s also sparred with some of Trump’s closest advisers, including son-in-law Jared Kushner.

“Bannon had one hell of a run,” Matt Drudge tweeted in response.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Rick Scott: Florida unemployment down to 4.1 percent

Gov. Rick Scott announced the creation of more than 26,000 private-sector jobs in July, with the unemployment rate remaining at “the lowest rate in a decade, 4.1 percent.”

“Over the past six and a half years, we have worked relentlessly to cut taxes, reduce burdensome regulations and completely turn around Florida’s economy,” Scott said in a statement. “Our goal was to create 700,000 jobs in seven years and while we were proud to reach that ambitious goal three years early, we did not slow down.

“I am proud to announce today that after cutting taxes more than 75 times, Florida businesses have created more than 1.4 million new jobs, officially doubling our promise to create 700,000 jobs in seven years.”

Scott, who released the latest jobs numbers at Morgan Auto Group’s Brandon Honda location, also plugged his latest priority: A constitutional amendment “to require a supermajority vote by future state legislatures to raise any taxes or fees.”

“Together, we can make sure future generations are not burdened with unfair taxes and that our state remains a national leader in job creation and opportunity,” Scott said.

 

Paul Sanford & Associates earns more than $165K in Q2 lobbying fees

The two-person firm of Paul Sanford and Jane Hennessy earned at least $165,000 for legislative work during the second quarter of 2017. The duo could earn a maximum of $199,993 for their legislative services, according to an analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

Sanford and Hennessy had a roster of 11 legislative clients during the second quarter of this year. The team did not report any executive branch work, according to an analysis of state records.

Two clients — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, and the Florida Insurance Council — paid the firm an average of $35,000 during the second quarter; while two more clients — JM Family Enterprises and Prime Therapeutics — paid the firm an average $25,000 during the second quarter. Three clients — the American Council of Life Insurance, FCCI Insurance Group, and the Florida Life and Health Insurance Guaranty Association — paid an average for $15,000 for legislative work.

Louis Betz & Associates could earn $239K in Q2 lobbying fees

Being small firm doesn’t mean you can’t pack a lot of punch; just ask Louis Betz & Associates.

The two-man team of Louis Betz and Travis Mitchell juggled 25 legislative clients and 11 executive branch clients during the second quarter, which included the second half of the 2017 Legislative Session and a brief special session. The firm earned at least $145,000 — $105,000 for its legislative work and $40,000 for executive branch work — during the three-month period.

The firm could earn up to $239,981 — a maximum of$169,987 for legislative work and $69,994 for executive branch work — during the second quarter, according to analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com.

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

Top paying legislative clients during the second quarter included American Traffic Solutions, Tampa Taxi Coalition, Waste Management of Florida, and Ygrene Energy Fund Florida, all of which paid an average of $15,000 for legislative work.

Eight clients — the City of Temple Terrace, Costa Creative, Crisis Center of Tampa Bay, Energy Systems Group, Link-Systems International, Mindshare Technologies, MOSI (Museum of Science & Industry), and Tampa-Hillsborough County Expressway Authority — all paid an average $5,000 for legislative work.

Waste Management clocked in as the firm’s top paying executive branch client, paying Betz and Mitchell $15,000 in the second quarter for executive branch work.

Latest on the legislative staffing merry-go-round

With a tip of the hat to LobbyTools, here are the most recent movements — both on and off — of the legislative merry-go-round.

On and off: Barbara Crosier is replacing Michael Poche as policy chief for the House Health Innovation Subcommittee.

Off and on: Alex Bickley changed roles from district secretary to legislative assistant for Lady Lake Republican Sen. Dennis Baxley.

Off: Patricia Gosney is stepping down as a legislative assistant for Plantation Democratic Sen. Lauren Book.

On and off: Marian McBryde is replacing Rhonda Thomas as a legislative assistant for Panama City Republican Sen. George Gainer.

On and off: David Marin is replacing Alessandro D’Amico as a legislative assistant for Hialeah Republican Sen. Rene Garcia.

Off and on: Ella Phillips changed roles from district secretary to legislative assistant for Fort Lauderdale Democrat Sen. Perry Thurston.

Off: Nancy Bernier is stepping down as a legislative assistant for Indialantic Republican Rep. Thad Altman.

Off: Pamela Watt is stepping down as district secretary for Monticello Republican Rep. Hasley Beshears.

Off: Jacob Hawkes is stepping down as secretary for Jacksonville Beach Republican Rep. Cord Byrd.

Off and on: Charles P. Smith is replacing Eddie Metzger as a legislative assistant for Fort Myers Republican Rep. Heather Fitzenhagen.

On: Kevin Deo is the new legislative assistant for Winter Haven Republican Rep. Sam Killebrew.

On and on: Janine Kiray and Coleton Reece are returning as district secretaries for Clearwater Republican Rep. Chris Latvala.

On and off: Bradley Wildman is replacing Natasha Dobkowski as district secretary for Ocala Republican Rep. Stan McClain.

Off: Leanne Roca is stepping down as a legislative assistant for Hialeah Republican Rep. Jose Oliva.

On: Samantha Story is the new district secretary for Palm Coast Republican Rep. Paul Renner.

On: Sarah Sims is the new district secretary for Naples Republican Rep. Bob Rommel.

 

Flags at half-staff for Marine Sgt. Joseph J. Murray of Jacksonville

Gov. Rick Scott on Monday ordered flags at half-staff for Marine Sgt. Joseph J. Murray of Jacksonville, who died last month with 15 others in a military plane crash in Mississippi.

“As a mark of respect for Sgt. Murray, I hereby direct the flags of the United States and the State of Florida to be flown at half-staff at the City Hall in Jacksonville, the County Courthouse in Duval County, and at the State Capitol in Tallahassee, from sunrise to sunset on Tuesday, August 15,” Scott said in a statement.

Murray was on a Marine Corps refueling plane that crashed and burned in a soybean field in the Mississippi Delta, killing all 16 military members aboard. The wreck scattered debris for miles and sent a pillar of black smoke rising over the countryside. It was the deadliest Marine crash — in the U.S. or abroad — since 2005.

In a statement last month, Scott said, “Ann and I join Americans across the nation in praying for the families and loved ones of the sixteen U.S. service members who lost their lives in this week’s tragic plane crash, including Marine Sgt. Joe Murray from Jacksonville.

“Sgt. Murray was well known as a beloved husband, father, son, and man of faith and service. We are heartbroken by this loss. Sgt. Murray and his fellow fallen service members will now be honored and remembered across our country as heroes. We pray that this legacy of heroism will bring Sgt. Murray’s family some comfort during this unimaginably difficult time.

“This tragedy is a stark reminder of the dangers our service members face each day as they selflessly protect our families and our freedom. The State of Florida is proud to be the home of brave heroes of like Sgt. Murray and we will continue to pray for the safety of all our service members at home and abroad.”

 

(The Associated Press contributed to this post, reprinted with permission.)

Becker & Poliakoff could post maximum earnings of $719K in Q2

With nearly 100 legislative clients, the government affairs team at Becker & Poliakoff PA continues to make its mark on the Capitol.

The 10-person lobby team earned the firm at least $465,000 — almost all of it for legislative work — during the second quarter of the year, which included the second half of the 2017 Legislative Session and a brief special session.

The firm could earn a maximum of $729,947 — a maximum of $719,948 for legislative work and $9,999 for executive branch work — during the second quarter of the year, according to an analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

The team of Mario Bailey, Jose Bermudez, Ellyn Bogdanoff, Bernie Friedman, Jose Fuentes, Yeline Goin, Yolanda Cash Jackson, Nicholas Matthews, Jeremy Shir, and Karen Skyers juggled 93 legislative clients and 45 executive branch clients during the second quarter.

Three clients — the Coalition of Franchise Associations, the Florida Association of Jewish Federations, and Florida Memorial University — paid an average of $25,000 for legislative services during the second quarter of 2017. Fourteen firms paid an average of $15,000 for legislative work.

American Clinical Solutions clocked in as the highest paying executive branch client, paying an average of $5,000 for executive services during the second quarter.

The firm, according to LobbyTools, reported median earnings of $555,000 for its legislative lobbying work during the first quarter of 2017.

Brecht Heuchan’s firm could earn up to $189K in Q2

The second quarter was good to Brecht Heuchan.

With eight legislative clients and 10 executive branch clients, The Labrador Company earned at least $130,000 — $70,000 for legislative clients and and $60,000 for executive branch clients — during the second quarter of 2017, which included the second half of the Legislative Session and a brief special session.

Heuchan could earn a maximum of $189,988 — a maximum of $99,944 for legislative work and $89,994 for executive branch work — during the second quarter of the year, according to an analysis of compensation reports conducted by FloridaPolitics.com

Lobbyists who are registered to represent clients before Florida’s legislative or executive branches are required to submit reports detailing their client roster and compensation each quarter. Reports for the second quarter are due to the state on Aug. 14.

Four legislative clients — the Florida Justice Association, The Richman Group of Florida, Inc., and Southern Wine & Spirits of America, Inc., and Wilkes & McHugh PA — paid Heuchan an average of $15,000 for his services during the second quarter; while two clients — Florida for Care, the group behind the 2016 medical marijuana constitutional amendment, and Tarpon Towers II LLC — paid him an average of $5,000 for his services.

Three executive branch clients — AltMed LLC, Parsons Transportation Group, and Tynda Holdings LLC — paid an average of $15,000 for his work during the second quarter; while three other clients — Florida for Care, Florida Patients First, and Richman Group of Florida — paid an average of $5,000 for his services.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons