Bill Nelson Archives - Page 3 of 46 - Florida Politics

Bill Nelson asks for senate panel investigation of Niger ambush

Florida’s U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is asking the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee to investigate the ambush of American soldiers in Niger, wondering if they were adequately supported.

Nelson, a Democrat, sent a letter Thursday to Committee Chair John McCain, an Arizona Republican, and Ranking Member Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Republican, stating that too little has been disclosed about the circumstances yet for the Oct. 4 battle in the Niger desert that left four American soldiers dead.

“According to published reports, when U.S. and partner forces were ambushed by ISIS-linked militants they were insufficiently equipped to respond to the attack and air assets were not readily available to provide rapid and necessary support,” Nelson wrote.

The Senate Armed Services Committee has a responsibility to ask critical questions about our mission in Niger and ensure our troops have the resources they need,” Nelson continued. “I appreciate your attention to this request and I look forward to working with you to get a better understanding of the circumstances surrounding the October 4th incident.”

Kathy Castor pushes bills to help with student loan debt

While Washington is filled with talk about cutting taxes and possibly health care benefits, Tampa Representative Kathy Castor sat down with current and former students from the University of South Florida (USF) and the University of Tampa (UT) at the Attic in downtown Tampa on Wednesday to ask them about two of her potential proposals regarding student loan debt, which continues drag the economy.

Having attended college in the 1980s, Castor said there are students with a lot more debt in 2017, with Pell Grants not keeping pace with inflation, rising tuition costs, and the attendant costs of paying for textbooks, transportation and a higher cost of living.

The average student for UT grads is approximately $31,000. At USF it’s $22,000.

Castor is co-sponsoring two bills to address the issue. The first and most pressing legislation looks to reestablish funding for the Federal Perkins Loan, after Congress failed to reauthorize the program at the end of September. About 2.7 million students in the U.S. received the Perkins Loan, which was subsidized by the students, who paid for it at a 5 percent interest rate.

She’s also sponsoring The Student Loan Relief Act,  which would lower the cap on federal student loan interest to 4 percent for undergraduate students, 5 percent for graduate students and 6 percent for parents.  It would change the way student loan interest rates are calculated, allow borrowers with loans disbursed before the effective date to refinance their loans at the new rates and eliminate loan origination fees.  U.S. Sen. Nelson unveiled the Senate version earlier this month.

“Just having certainty that you know that (the debt rate) is going to stay there…that would be amazing to me and I’m sure a lot of students will have the confidence in what they’ll be paying,” said UT student Aislinn E. Sroczynsk.

“I think people could breath a sigh of relief knowing it’s going to be capped at something, ” added Troy Schneider, also a UT student. “That would really help a lot of people.”

Moneer Kheireddine, USF student body president, said a problem is that the payment schedule is organized so that students must pay for the entire semester just as it begins. “Instead of having to pay off loans at the beginning of the semester, they can space it out and as they accumulate their finances through the semester, they can pay that off as opposed to having to pay off loans.”

“I’ve lived most of my business career with the wolf at the door,” said Kostas Stoilas, entrepreneur-in-residence with Tampa Bay Wave, referring to the loans he continues to pay back, years after earning his MBA at UT.

“You try to keep that wolf at bay by keeping your expenses down,” he says, referring to the $40,000 in debt he incurred in school, and how that affects his monthly bottom line as heads a commercial real estate company.

Sroczynsk says she aspires to go to a top-tier law school like Georgetown. But she worries that if she can’t afford to payback the loans after graduation, it could diminish her zeal for even pursuing such a career.

“I don’t want to have to compromise my career or my passion…just because I can’t afford my loans, or because the minimal payment is too high.”

Castor jokingly asked the students who gave their thumbs up to her proposals if they were ready to lobby the state Legislature, but Kheireddine said he’s already scheduled to travel to Tallahassee three times next month and would gladly advocate on her behalf.

Castor said debt relief for students is rarely discussed in Congress these days, which is why she’s hoping to build a coalition in the House of Representatives to push for her bills.

“The bulk of the year it’s been a fight over healthcare,” she said. “I hope they’re going to talk to state legislators, business leaders and anyone else.”

U.S. Senate panel to investigate Hollywood Hills tragedy, at Bill Nelson’s request

The U.S. Senate Finance Committee announced today that it is launching an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of 14 residents at The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills nursing home in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

The investigation comes following a request from Florida’s U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, a senior member of the committee.

The residents of the nursing home were left without power and no air conditioning in the days following the Sept. 10-11 devastation by Hurricane Irma. Two days after the storm left, two residents were found dead in their beds and others were rushed to the hospital, where 12 more would die after apparently being baked in the sweltering facility.

Florida is investigating, and has revoked the home’s license, and the owners of the home are suing the state over that revocation.

“It is my understanding that it is the state’s responsibility to certify a nursing home’s compliance with all federal emergency preparedness regulations in order to receive federal payments under the Medicare and Medicaid programs,” Nelson wrote on Sept. 29 to U.S. Sens. Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican, and Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, who serve as the panel’s Chairman and Ranking Member respectively.

“Because the certification for a skilled nursing facility is subject to CMS approval, and the Senate Committee on Finance has jurisdiction over the Medicare and Medicaid programs, I urge the Committee to use its authority to conduct a complete investigation into the State of Florida’s certification of the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills to determine what led to the deaths of 12 seniors there in the wake of Hurricane Irma,” Nelson’s letter continued.

Responding to Nelson’s request, Hatch and Wyden sent letters Tuesday to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, requesting information about its new nursing home emergency preparedness requirements, and to the state of Florida seeking answers to questions regarding the state’s emergency preparedness plans and response to Hurricane Irma.

The committee also requested similar information from Texas, regarding nursing homes affected there by Hurricane Harvey.

“Similar reports after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma raise concerns about the adequacy of emergency preparedness and response at nursing homes and other facilities,” they wrote. “Our committee would like information about the federal requirements that were applicable during these events and the actions CMS has taken since.”

“We are writing to request information from Florida about its preparations for and responses to Hurricane Irma as it relates to nursing homes and other similar facilities,” the senators wrote in a letter to Florida’s Secretary of the Agency for Health Care Administration, Justin Senior. “The Senate Committee on Finance has jurisdiction over both the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs. As part of our oversight responsibilities, we want to ensure the safety of residents and patients in nursing homes and other similar facilities during natural and manmade disasters.”

In 2016, CMS finalized new national emergency preparedness requirements for Medicare- and Medicaid-participating providers and suppliers. This new rule requires long-term care facilities to develop emergency preparedness plans to ensure that staff’s and residents’ basic needs are met in the event of natural or man-made disasters, including hurricanes, wildfires, and flooding. It also explicitly requires facilities to have policies and procedures in place to address alternate sources of energy to maintain temperatures during these emergencies.

According to federal regulations, it is the state’s responsibility to certify that a nursing home is in compliance with all applicable federal rules and regulations, including the new rules put in place 2016.

Despite receiving state certification, the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills did not have an alternate source of energy powering its air conditioning unit and, as a result, was unable to maintain temperatures after the facility lost power.

At a hearing last week of the Florida Senate Appropriations Subcommittee for Health and Human Services, Molly McKinstry, deputy secretary of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration said her agency and other state agencies were in constant contact before, during and after Hurricane Irma with all the state’s nursing homes.

McKinstry said that many nursing homes and assisted living facilities lost power and quite a few visited by state officials had interior temperatures in the high 80s and low 90s, despite meeting all the current state requirements. She said loss of power and heating issues were a “prevalent” problem.

AFP ad: Bill Nelson is standing in the way of a simple, fair tax system

Americans for Prosperity is upping attention on Florida’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson for the congressional budget fight Wednesday by launching an internet commercial declaring that he is standing in the way of a “simple, fair tax system.”

The conservative organization is including Nelson, through its Americans for Prosperity-Florida affiliate, as a target in a nationwide, multi-million dollar advertising buy that targets a handful of U.S. Senators, including Republicans, who’ve shown some interest in tax reform but appear unlikely to support the Republican budget plan that includes language-making sweeping tax reform possible.

Among others being targeted: U.S. Sens. Tammy Baldwin, a Wisconsin Democrat; Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat; and John McCain, an Arizona Republican. On Tuesday Americans for Prosperity, a political advocacy group founded and heavily funded by David H. Koch and Charles Koch, released a letter sent to Nelson and the other senators urging them to vote yes on the Republican proposal.

The new ad features a woman talking into the camera, saying, “People are sick of politics. I am too. But fixing our broken tax system isn’t about politics – it’s about helping people. It means the powerful, the well-connected, the politicians — they’ll stop benefiting from a rigged system. It means everyday Americans will have more to spend on what’s important to them. That’s what tax reform will do. So, what’s stopping us?”

The answer comes next, with a picture of Nelson, and the statement, “Senator Nelson is standing in the way of a simple, fair tax system.”

“Nelson has hinted at being willing to work with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to reform the tax code to make it more fair and efficient,” AFP-FL State Director Chris Hudson stated in a news release issued by his organization. “This is a once in a generation opportunity that deserves his full endorsement immediately. It’s time for him to help pass tax reform and not obstruct the process any further. Our activists are ready to make sure that Senator Nelson does not get in the way.”

Americans for Prosperity urges Bill Nelson to support Republican budget bill

The conservative fiscal policy organization Americans for Prosperity-Florida Monday urged Florida’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson to vote yes on the U.S. Senate’s Republican budget bill.

AFP-FL stressed that the bill contains a set of parameters for a tax reform package that could pass the U.S. Senate by a simple majority vote. The budget blueprint outlined Sept. 29 by the Senate Budget Committee calls for $1.5 trillion worth of tax cuts over the next decade.

“A vote against the budget is a vote to obstruct tax reform,” AFP-FL State Director Chris Hudson stated in a news release. “Tax reform will unrig the economy by making the tax code fairer and simpler, and stopping the politicians and well-connected from gaming the code for their personal benefit. If Senator Nelson is serious about helping middle-class Floridians, he should vote ‘Yes’ on the Senate Budget Resolution.”

On Monday the national Americans for Prosperity, a political advocacy group founded and heavily funded by David H. Koch and Charles Koch, sent a letter to Nelson and other senators urging them to vote yes on the Republican proposal.

AFP-FL also indicated it would begin airing an ad urging voters to urge Nelson to do so.

“We urge you to vote YES on the Senate Republican fiscal year 2018 budget resolution. Americans for Prosperity will include this vote in our congressional scorecard,” the letter opens.

“The Senate budget resolution includes many important reforms that would restore responsibility in our federal finances. It reins in federal non-defense discretionary spending by $632 billion, respects the overall discretionary spending caps established by the Budget Control Act, and includes many other provisions that would incite economic growth. Most notably, it provides a pathway for passing comprehensive, pro-growth tax reform,” the letter states. “The resolution includes reconciliation instructions that give the Senate Finance Committee the flexibility it needs to fix the broken tax code.

“Passing a budget resolution is the first step toward delivering a fairer, flatter, and simpler tax code that works better for everyday Americans,” the letter continues. “A vote against the budget resolution is effectively a vote against tax reform. A vote against the budget resolution is a vote for the status quo and the status quo is unacceptable. Conservatives in Washington should not miss this once-in-a-generation opportunity.”

 

Rick Scott’s political committee added $75K in September

Gov. Rick Scott’s Let’s Get to Work committee added $75,000 in contributions last month after showing just $1,000 raised in August.

The committee supported Scott’s successful re-election campaign for governor and could be back in action soon as a pot of money backing his probable campaign to challenge incumbent U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson next year.

The September money came in through just two contributions, one for $50,000 from the Florida Retail Federation’s political committee, and another from $25,000 from Tampa-based check cashing company Amscot Financial.

Both donors have a bit of a history supporting Scott’s committee.

FRF Political Committee gave Let’s Get to Work $25,000 in August 2016, while Amscot had given the committee $125,000 across four major contributions since 2014 before chipping in last month.

Let’s Get to Work’s income was offset by $66,873 in spending, with a good deal of the money heading to Maryland-based political consulting and advertising firm On Message.

The group, which took in about $21,000 last month for media production and consulting, has been Scott’s favored shop for such services for a while and has received millions of dollars from the Let’s Get to Work committee and well as the ECO of the same name that preceded it.

Grassroots Targeting picked up $15,000 for data services and Tallahassee-based ContributionLink picked up $8,000 for database services. Most of the rest of the September spending went toward various political and fundraising consultants.

With September in the books, Scott’s committee has nearly $2.8 million on hand.

Marco Rubio joins Bill Nelson’s call for urgent attention for public health crisis in Puerto Rico

Florida’s Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio on Friday sent a letter similar to one sent by his Democratic colleague urging more federal help for Puerto Rico, still darkened by the ravishes of Hurricane Maria more than three weeks ago.

Rubio asked U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Acting Secretary Eric Hargan to “provide a complete update and assessment of the public health concerns still plaguing Puerto Rico,” and expressed concern “that there has not been enough progress on a plan to provide a long-term solution so patients and officials are not constantly struggling with one crisis after another.”

Earlier Friday, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson announced he sent a similar letter to Hargan, warning that people were dying in Puerto Rico and federal assistance had to be accelerated before more people die.

As did Nelson, Rubio cited news accounts warning of horrific public health crises emerging. He asked Hargan to take aggressive action to help them.

“In light of the island’s damaged infrastructure and its residents’ lack of access to power and clean water, it is critical that the island receives the resources needed to properly treat people who depend on medically necessary services,” Rubio wrote. “Many Floridians contact my office every day to emphasize that their family and friends in Puerto Rico are still struggling to recover from this deadly storm.

“There are news reports that some water in Puerto Rico has been contaminated, causing people to contract leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that can cause kidney damage, meningitis, liver failure, and death,” Rubio continued. “I am very concerned that there could be additional cases of leptospirosis or other bacterial infections, and that the island’s lack of resources could prevent those infected from receiving necessary treatment.”

Both Nelson and Rubio called attention to the dearth of operating dialysis centers and oxygen supplies, with Rubio saying he has heard personally from providers and officials that it is incredibly difficult to get supplies. Rubio acknowledged that progress has been made, but said he was concerned there has not been enough progress on long-term solutions for patients. He requested a complete update and assessment on public health issues in Puerto Rico.

He also said, “I also urge you to immediately clarify the conflicting information reported by government officials and media outlets.”

Bill Nelson urges feds to do more for Puerto Rico ‘before more people die’

Bill Nelson is imploring the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to step up their efforts in Puerto Rico, “before more people die and this becomes a full-blown crisis.”

In a letter to acting HHS Secretary Eric Hargan, Florida’s senior U.S. Senator responds to news reports in The New York Times and warns that the continued lack of power and potable water to much of the island residents, its hospitals, and other critical life-support institutions such as dialysis centers, contaminated floodwaters, and other hazards “are placing thousands of residents at risk of infection, and even death.”

“While I understand the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is sending personnel and resources to Puerto Rico, this article made clear that it is not enough,” Nelson wrote in the letter. “The situation is not improving, and Americans are dying. I have raised this issue with your agency before, and I urge you now to take immediate steps to prevent further loss of life.

“I implore you to partner with the island to ensure that priority locations like dialysis centers and hospitals have access to adequate supplies of diesel, personnel, and medication, and have power restored as soon as possible,” Nelson continued.

Nelson also urged better coordination between HHS and other federal agencies, including the Federal Emergency Management Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration, to move supplies to where they are needed.

“The actions mentioned above only scratch the surface of what needs to be done,” Nelson concluded. “I urge the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to act before more people die and this becomes a full-blown crisis.”

Bill Nelson fundraises off Irma again, Republicans say it’s ‘disgusting’

Bill Nelson just cannot help himself.

After Republicans blasted a “tone deaf” email last month that sought to raise funds off Hurricane Irma, Florida’s senior U.S. Senator is at it again.

Nelson writes: “There’s been a lot going on in Washington recently, from finding ways to fund these massive hurricane recovery efforts to prevent the passage of yet another disastrous GOP health care bill.”

The senator then proclaims his focus on “one thing,” which is doing everything he can to fight for constituents, adding that it is his job to “make sure your voice is heard in the Senate.”

Since Hurricane Irma happened over a month ago (supposedly past its disaster expiration date), Nelson seems to think now would be the right time to “survey” Floridians on how he’s doing.

Along with a money pitch, of course.

And once again, national Republicans are quick to this point out, saying it’s time he answers for his “disgusting” move.

Memories of Irma are still fresh in the minds of many Floridians, and Hurricane Maria continues to be an active disaster for the people of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and their families and loved ones in Florida. Republicans feel any extra money and resources should be used to help those suffering, not for a campaign more than a year away.

“Bill Nelson needs to explain why he continues to fundraise off Hurricane Irma,” said NRSC Communications Director Katie Martin in an email Thursday. “Floridians are still struggling to clean up from this devastating storm, yet all Bill Nelson cares about is filling his own campaign coffers.”

Politics can wait, says the GOP, calling for Nelson to resist the urge to raise money. There will always be time to fundraise later.

Rick Kriseman, Kerry Kriseman, GOTV Oct. 9, 2017

Rick Kriseman pounds the pavement as ballots hit the streets

Mail ballots have started to hit the streets in St. Pete cend incumbent Mayor Rick Kriseman has started to pound the pavement again ahead of the second round of his re-election battle against former two-term Mayor Rick Baker.

Kriseman and his wife, Kerry, joined their corps of volunteers and staffers kicking off their get-out-the-vote efforts ahead of the Nov. 7 election.

Kriseman and co. knocked on doors across the city and talked one-on-one with voters to plead their case for another four years. The mayor also pitched in at the phone bank to give voters a heads up that the first mail ballots are on the way.

“We’ve come a long way in 4 years. Crime is down, big projects are moving forward, and our city is preparing for climate change,” Kriseman said in a Monday press release. “This November’s election is going to come down to conversations between neighbors in their front yards and living rooms. August turnout was record high, and we’re here to earn every vote to keep St. Pete moving forward.”

Despite polls showing him behind by as much as 7 points three days before the election, Kriseman edged out Baker by a hair in the August primary, which saw the field whittled from six candidates down to two. The slim win wasn’t lost on Kriseman, whose campaign acknowledged it was indeed a “come-from-behind” victory.

That doesn’t mean they see it as a meaningless win, either.

Even though both candidates had to turn around and fund raise their hearts out to reload for the what’s become the most expensive mayoral election in city history, the mayor’s campaign said Monday that the primary win brought forth “a surge in grassroots enthusiasm with volunteers from all over the bay area committing their time and energy to re-electing Mayor Kriseman.”

While the St. Petersburg mayor position is officially non-partisan, Kriseman was a Democrat in the Florida House before becoming mayor. He has picked up endorsements from top elected Dems, including U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Congressman Charlie Crist.

The Florida Democratic Party has also been in his corner and treated the city election as a bellwether for 2018, while multiple left-leaning groups such as the Sierra Club have also flocked to his side.

One of the deciders in the August election was undoubtedly the 11th hour endorsement he received from former President Barack Obama.

Kriseman is historically an underachiever with black voters, who make up 15 percent of the city’s electorate. Baker, on the other hand, is one of the rare Republicans who excells at making inroads with the community. The Obama nod put a thumb on the scales, though, and may have been what shunted Baker’s chances of winning it all in the primary.

The Kriseman camp also pointed out Monday that the mayor bested every pre-primary poll in his 69-vote August win, and he may have to do it again in the general election. A St. Pete Polls survey released last week showed Baker with a 1-point advantage over Kriseman, 46-45 with about 9 percent undecided.

All St. Petersburg voters will get a chance to pick one of the Ricks on Election Day, set for Nov. 7, but voters in City Council District 2 and District 6 will also pick the replacements for Jim Kennedy and Karl Nurse, respectively, while District 4 voters will decide whether to give Darden Rice another term.

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