Alan Grayson Archives - Page 2 of 52 - Florida Politics

Mitch Perry Report for 12.12.16 – Heroes

Bob Dylan opted to blow off the Nobel Prize for Literature awards ceremony in Sweden this weekend, instead opting to have Azita Raji, the U.S. Ambassador in Sweden, read a speech that he composed (And no, I had never heard of our ambassador to Sweden until I looked it up this weekend).

Among those who care about this prestigious award, there has been some criticism about awarding a songwriter, and not a novelist or poet.

The Swedish Academy defended its decision to extend the award to a genre such as folk music. Speaking at the dinner, Professor Horace Engdahl of the Swedish Academy, a literary critic, said the choice “seemed daring only beforehand and already seems obvious.”

There are those who thought if the Swedes were going to award an American literary hero who is still around to accept the honor, it should have been Philip Roth or Don DeLillo, who are 83 and 80, respectively.

DeLillo is still at it, by the way, and while his latter day works may never have the impact of 1997’s “Underworld,” he still provokes in “Zero K,” which was published this spring.

Somebody who did actually attend an awards ceremony this weekend was Madonna, was gave a fiercely emotional speech at the Billboard Women in Music 2016 event that touched on feminism, sexism and ageism.

“I think the most controversial thing I have ever done is to stick around,” she explained. “Michael is gone. Tupac is gone. Prince is gone. Whitney is gone. Amy Winehouse is gone. David Bowie is gone. But I’m still standing. I’m one of the lucky ones and every day I count my blessings.”

Speaking of Prince, if you were a fan of His Royal Badness, please do read this piece in the new GQ, which features some of some of his closest friends sharing their favorite personal anecdotes about the man.

Sticking with Arts & Culture events from this weekend, some of Hollywood’s best films of the year are now coming out steadily as we approach Christmas, and two Oscar friendly releases hit theaters in Tampa Bay this weekend: “Noctural Animals and “Manchester by the Sea.”

The latter will undoubtedly reap multiple nominations, as it depicts how a man deals with an unbelievable human tragedy.

The film is getting much love everywhere, but not from Samuel L. Jackson.

“The politics of what happens during this time of year is very interesting in Hollywood,” he in Dubai last weekend,according to the Wrap“The movies they choose to say are amazing and great, you know — ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ oh my god, you must see it, it’s an amazing film!’ But, ehh, I guess it is — to somebody.”

“It’s not an inclusive film, you know what I mean?” Jackson continued. “And I’m sure that ‘Moonlight’ will be thought of the same way. They’ll say, ‘Well, that’s a black movie. Where are the white people?’ We’ll say the same thing about ‘Manchester by the Sea.’”

For the record, I saw the much acclaimed “Moonlight” a few weeks ago, and observed some young back teens leave the theater when there was just a hint of some man-on-man action.

“Nocturnal Animals” is fashion designer Tom Ford’s second feature, and it is mesmerizing (though extremely violent at times in a “Straw Dogs” sort of way ). But the first two minutes of the film – I guess a commentary on what we beautiful – is going to challenge most audiences with his slow motion shots of corpulent nude women dancing. It is something, for better or worse, you’ll never forget.

In other news..

The Pinellas County Republican and Democratic Executive Committees vote in the local party elections tonight, but all the candidates (up to now) are running unopposed.

In perhaps his last act in Congress, Alan Grayson filed a bill on Friday in the name of the late Andrew Joseph III, the 14-year-old black youth who was killed crossing I-4 after Hillsborough County sheriff deputies released him after detaining him and other students from the Florida State Fair in February of 2014.

And we take one last look at what happened in the Tampa City Council District 7 race that saw Luis Viera beat Jim Davison by one point last week.

Alan Grayson files bill named after Tampa youth to promote civil rights compliance

In perhaps his last act as a member of Congress, Orlando-area Democratic Congressman Alan Grayson announced on Friday that he was filing the “Andrew Joseph III Act,” a bill which requires any jurisdiction seeking a specific federal grant to have an independent civilian review board in place.

In February of 2014, Hillsborough County Sheriff’s deputies ejected 99 students from the Florida State Fair, including Andrew Joseph III, a 14-year-old African American, for rowdy behavior during the annual Student Day – a day off from Hillsborough County Schools with free admission to the fair. After interrogating him, stripping him to the waist and arresting him without notifying his parents, deputies dropped Andrew two miles from the fair. He was killed trying to cross I-4 to return to the fairgrounds.

In February, the family of Joseph filed a lawsuit naming Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee and several deputies, the Florida State Fair Authority, the Hillsborough County School Board and the school district. The suit alleged the “unjustified arrest and detention of a nonviolent and non-resistant juvenile.”

In 2015, Student Day’s rules were changed. Deputies would have to contact the parents or guardians of any juveniles who were ejected. Students must also be with an adult after 6 p.m.

“This is not just one person’s tragedy. It is not just the tragedy of these parents standing at his grave site. It is the tragedy of America,” Grayson said from the House Floor earlier this year. “We persist in being a country of sometimes casual racism, racism that sometimes goes unnoticed.”

Grayson first took interest in the case publicly in the fall of 2015, where he held a press conference with the parents of Andrew Joseph in Tampa. Two months later, he sent a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch, calling on her to have the FBI investigate the case.

“Andrew was forced to take off some his clothes, for the stated purpose of allowing the police to check for gang-related tattoos,” Grayson wrote. “He was photographed, and information about him was entered into a database. With no evidence of wrongdoing, or even suspicion of wrongdoing, the police nevertheless removed Andrew (a 14-year-old without adult supervision) from the Fair, by patrol car. The police released Andrew well away from the Fair, by patrol car. The police released Andrew well away from the Fair, near four busy thoroughfares, two of them Interstate highways. At no time did the Sheriff’s Office attempt to contact Andrew’s parents, or direct him to do so.”

In March of 2016, Grayson returned to Tampa near the scene of Andrew Joseph III’s death to announce that the Justice Department would not be investigating the case. In a letter to Grayson that he made public that day, Assistant Attorney General Peter J. Kadzik wrote that “accident, mistake, fear, negligence or bad judgement are not sufficient to establish a willful federal criminal civil rights violation.”

“It’s been two years!  And I don’t have a police report. Not one sentence,”  Joseph’s father, Andrew Joseph Jr. said at that news conference (The Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office says that the Florida Highway Patrol did write up a report).

“I absolutely do not know how I can ever show my appreciation and gratitude to Congressman Grayson,” said Deanna Joseph, Andrew’s mother, in a statement on Friday. “This has given us hope that the world will never allow another tragic death of a child in the manner in which Andrew Joseph III’s life ended.”

The Andrew Joseph III Act, H.R. 6505, calls for building a stronger system of law enforcement accountability, and instill a greater confidence in community policing.

Grayson will be leaving Washington when the new Congress is sworn in next month. He gave up his congressional seat earlier this year to run for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate, where he fell a distant second to Jupiter Representative Patrick Murphy.

Alan Grayson adds amendment to get U.N. to hire Americans

Talk about stopping the export of jobs: U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson has added an amendment to a likely to pass bill that seeks to get the United Nations to hire more Americans.

Citing U.N. data, Grayson’s office argued that the United States pays 22 percent of the international organization’s budget; yet only 6 percent of New York-based organization’s employees are Americans.

Grayson’s amendment was included in the Department of State Authorities Act for Fiscal Year 2017, Senate Bill 1635, which was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives by a 374-16 vote on Monday might.

According to a press release from Grayon’s congressional office, the amendment calls on the U.S. Secretary of State to issue an annual report on whether the United Nations Secretariat and its supported agencies are “taking good faith steps to increase the staffing of United States citizens,” as well as assessing what “additional steps the organization could be taking to increase such staffing.”

The bill would apply to United Nations agencies, not just its headquarters. Grayson’s office stated that if the U.N. hired a proportional share of Americans based on funding, 12,000 more jobs would go to Americans.

Senate Bill 1635 was approved by the U.S. Senate in April. But that version did not have Grayson’s amendment nor other amendments added by the house Monday. So the amended bill must go back to the senate for approval before heading to the White House.

“The United Nations building is the only place within the U.S. border where you might find an implicit sign saying: ‘Americans not welcome,’” Grayson said. “Given the massive amount of funding we provide, the UN should hire more U.S. workers. This amendment will accomplish that goal.”

His office touted it as the 121st amendment he had successfully passed, and it will be one of his last. Grayson, a three-term Democrat from Orlando, leaves office Jan. 3.

Alan Grayson says goodbye to Orange County Democrats, for now

Democratic U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson of Orlando made what’s likely to be his swan song appearance for now before Orange County Democrats Saturday, thanking them for backing him so he could “do so much good for so many people.”

Grayson sought the state Democratic nomination to run for Florida’s U.S. Senate seat but lost, and so he did not seek re-election this year to a fourth term. That opened the door to Darren Soto, who won in Florida’s 9th Congressional District. Restricting gave Florida’s 10th Congressional District a strong Democratic voter base, and Val Demings won there. And Stephanie Murphy upset Republican incumbent U.S. Rep. John Mica in Florida’s 6th Congressional District.

Those three districts split Orlando.

“It’s hard to believe I stand before you as the only Orange County Democrat to represent downtown Orlando in the last 42 years. But that changes a month from today when we have three, count them, three, Orange County Democrats in Congress,” Grayson said. “And I want to give credit where credit is due, and that is you all. We have gone through a very difficult time, wandering for 40 years through the desert here. But now we’ve reached the point with organization, teamwork, registrations, absentee ballot requests, and the legwork we all do … have led to the point where we finally are fully represented in the House of Representatives by Democrats.”

“But now we’ve reached the point with organization, teamwork, registrations, absentee ballot requests, and the legwork we all do … have led to the point where we finally are fully represented in the House of Representatives by Democrats.”

Despite his loss – and his wife Dena Grayson‘s loss to Soto in the CD 9 Democratic primary, he has not ruled out a return to politics, and his appearance Saturday included no suggestion that he was going away.

Grayson took a moment to highlight his career, notably that he passed 120 amendments or bills in his six years in Congress, 2008-10 and 2012-16. That was capped Friday with the passages of two more amendments, getting health-care-quality and substance-abuse counseling measures for veterans and service members into the $611.2 billion National Defense Authorization Act, which the House approved Friday.

Grayson noted that most of his successes came when Republicans controlled Congress.

“It turns out you can shame them into any good idea you want when you have might and right on your side,” he said.

Pam Keith to lead Florida group of Democrats to campaign for Louisiana Senate hopeful

Since Hillary Clinton lost the election to Donald Trump three weeks ago, many Democrats have been disconsolate, still stunned to deal with the reality of a Trump presidency.

Pam Keith says she understands the sentiment, but says it’s time for Democrats to get active and start fighting back. The way she’s doing that is to travel late next week to help out the U.S. Senate candidacy of Foster Campbell in Louisiana. And she’s calling other Florida Democrats to join her.

“I think a lot of us Dems are heartsick and trying to channel all of that emotion into something constructive,” Keith said in an email to FloridaPolitics. “For the time being, there really isn’t anything we can do about Trump, other than gnash our teeth and pray that the Electoral college sees the light.  But with respect to the Senate, there is something we can do.  The runoff in Louisiana would’t be a run-off unless it was close, so adding whatever we can to the mix might actually get something positive done.”

With no senate candidate getting fifty percent of the vote in Louisiana on Nov. 8, Campbell made the runoff against Republican John N. Kennedy, the state treasurer. Campbell is a 69-year-old cattle farmer and public service commissioner. A survey taken last week by a GOP polling firm shows Campbell trailing Kennedy by double-digits.

When Keith announced on her Facebook page that she was intending to spend two days in Louisiana campaigning for Campbell, she asked if other Democrats would be willing to join her.

“We have gotten LOTS of positive feedback for folks who want to help, many of whom can’t travel but are eager to do phone banking. I think we will reach our 20 people goal based on what I’m seeing so far,” Keith says.

Keith is a former Naval Officer JAG and attorney who finished third in the Democratic race for U.S. Senator this summer. Though she didn’t come to defeating winner Patrick Murphy, but came close to knocking off congressman Alan Grayson for second place.

Keith says that she thought such a GOTV effort would be promoted by the Democratic National Committee or the various state parties. But that didn’t happen.

“Seeing no action on the part of either group, I just decided to see what I could do on my own. Bret Berlin has been immensely helpful and is now working with me to get this done. The Campbell team in Louisiana is very positive about getting our help.”

Democrats nationwide are looking at the race, with the Campbell campaign taking in more than  $2.5 million in contributions in the weeks surrounding the Nov. 8 election, according to his latest filing with the Federal Election Commission.

Between Oct. 20 and Nov. 20, he raised $2,490,939 from individuals and another $29,600 from political action committees, according to the report his campaign released on Tuesday.

Keith and her friends will be in Louisiana on December 9 and 10. The election takes place on December 10.

 

Orlando attorney wins seat on Soil & Water Conservation

Attorney Michael Barber won the District 1 seat in Orange County’s Soil and Water Conservation race.

The former assistant state attorney beat Environmentalist Maria Bolton-Joubert and Star Grayson, Congressman Alan Grayson’s daughter, for the win.

Barber garnered 159,987 votes or 42 percent of the vote over Bolton-Joubert’s 145,714 (38 percent), and Grayson’s 76,628 (20 percent).

“I know it was a tight race with Maria Bolton-Joubert and her heart was in the right place,” said Barber, an Orlando resident. “I connected with the people through social media and she took a more traditional approach with signs. I didn’t see much campaigning from Star Grayson at all.”

Barber said he is hoping to become an advocate for water quality and to use his seat to bring more public awareness to this important issue. He practices criminal and education law with the Umansky Law Firm in Orlando.

All three candidates are young. The 30-year-old Barber beat Bolton-Jobert, 34, and Grayson, who turned 18 this month.

Grayson filed for the seat when she was 17 and turned 18 in time for the election. The loss means the Grayson family lost all three of their election races this year. Alan Grayson lost his bid for the U.S. Senate and his wife, Dena, lost a race for the U.S. House.

Mitch Perry Report for 10.27.16 — Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy battle it one last time

So much in the news today to discuss, but let’s start (and end) with a review of last night’s debate between Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy.

If you were scoring at home (congratulations if you were, to paraphrase Keith Olbermann from his ESPN days), you might have had Rubio up by a few points at the end, but like the first debate, it was relatively competitive throughout.

Rubio has a lot more experience on the debate stage, which is why Murphy should have debated Pam Keith and Alan Grayson in August. That’s old news, but he needed to sharpen himself up against Rubio, and that was a blown opportunity.

One of the most interesting exchanges was about the Affordable Care Act, and a reason why the Health & Human Services Department announced premiums would rise for the ACA by an average of 22 percent in the coming year.

As is pretty common knowledge, the vast majority of those people who have signed up for the plan are older and sicker. Younger folks who are healthy and (for the most part) don’t require insurance, aren’t paying into it, and are willing to suck up the fine from the I.R.S.

The ACA did have a mechanism in it to help adjust for the added risk insurers might have to take on. That’s where Rubio comes into play. As he said again last night, he led the way in stopping what he called “a bailout” to the insurance companies by blocking that mechanism from kicking in.

PolitiFact says “experts have said Rubio is wrong to call the program a bailout, and that the program is supposed to pay for itself through fees from insurers.”

Call it what you want, but Rubio says the key thing is he saved taxpayers money. Murphy takes the view that the move is hurting those people on the ACA who now have to pay these higher premiums.

When asked what his plan was in place of the ACA, Rubio said he wanted to make it easier for employers to incentivize their workers to buy tax-free plans or to give people tax credits to purchase plans, as well as create “high-risk” pools for those with pre-existing conditions. Murphy said that’s been tried in other states and found wanting.

If you didn’t see the debate, however, you could boil the candidates’ arguments down to one sentence. In the case of Rubio, it was that Murphy had accomplished nothing during his four years in Congress.

For Murphy, it was that Rubio never showed up to vote; and why wouldn’t he denounce Donald Trump?

Murphy said that A LOT. It sort of seemed a bit desperate at the end.

Obviously Chuck Schumer and the DSCC doesn’t believe they need Florida to win back the U.S. Senate. According to the Cook Political Report, the Dems are poised to win 5-7 states next month, which would get them over the top. That’s NOT including Florida.

In other news …

It’s getting closer in Florida. CNN announced this morning they have moved Florida from “leaning Democrat” to “battleground.” That’s based on a Bloomberg poll showing Trump winning in Florida that startled a few folks yesterday. A few hours later, a Florida Atlantic University poll showed Hillary Clinton back up, but only by three points, after having been up by six in the same survey two weeks earlier.

Hillary Clinton spoke before a sun-splashed crowd in downtown Tampa yesterday, warning her supporters that Donald Trump has been telling supporters he can win, and that he’s right in saying that.

Rubio continues to lead Murphy in two new polls — obviously conducted pre-debate.

The League of Conservation Voters is kicking another $100,000 for a digital ad campaign against David Jolly in the CD 13 race.

That controversial campaign ad by the DCCC that photoshopped Jolly with Trump was fodder for some Stephen Colbert humor the other night.

At Sun City Center, Marco Rubio derides Patrick Murphy as an ‘old-fashioned liberal’

Marco Rubio has been making the case that Patrick Murphy hasn’t accomplished much of anything during his four years in the House of Representatives. Now, with the polls tightening, he’s saying the voting record of his Democratic rival in the U.S. Senate race is also too liberal.

“Why does someone lie about their background, about things that they have done? Apparently because they haven’t done anything,” Rubio told a couple dozen supporters at a golf clubhouse in Sun City Center in South Hillsborough County early Monday morning. “Here’s what’s worse: When he’s not lying, he’s actually incredibly liberal.”

Rubio citied Murphy’s support of the Iran nuclear deal and his support for closing down Guantanamo Bay as evidence that the Jupiter representative is too left for Florida voters.

“I’ve seen this ad the other day. It says he’s an independent voice,” Rubio said, adding, “Not on the issues that count.”

“On the issues that count, he doesn’t just mislead people, he’s a good old fashioned liberal, and Florida cannot afford to have somebody that liberal in the U.S. Senate, particularly on issues of national security,” Rubio said.

“Patrick Murphy is one of the most independent members of Congress and it’s clear that Marco Rubio is desperate,” replied Murphy spokesperson Galia Slayen. “Despite millions of dollars in special interest money being spent against Patrick, we’re tied in the polls, Rubio’s hometown paper endorsed Patrick, and President Obama exposed Rubio for the coward that he is for continuing to support Donald Trump. Marco Rubio is devoid of political courage and lying about Patrick’s record. Floridians deserve better.”

Murphy’s voting record was certainly not considered that liberal to Florida progressives when he first declared his candidacy for Senate in early 2015. Murphy actually was a Republican before switching to become a Democrat, and his votes in support of the Keystone XL Pipeline and for a House committee to investigate Benghazi were frequently invoked by Alan Grayson, Murphy’s top opponent in the Democratic primary.

Campaigning on the first day of early voting in Hillsborough County (and in 49 other counties in Florida), Rubio said while much of the focus is on the presidential race, he emphasized the importance of his Senate race, referring to the power a senator has in approving or rejecting Supreme Court justices. He said if the next nominee happens to be in their mid-50s, they’ll likely be on the court for the next 20-25 years, “which is the equivalent of three eight-year presidencies.”

“That means that for the next 25 years, the very balance of the Supreme Court is at stake,” he added.

With Donald Trump speaking in Tampa Monday night, the Murphy campaign issued out a statement with the headline, “Will Today Be The Day?” asking mischievously if the two could end up on stage together. “We’re not doing presidential events,” Rubio said, not looking pleased to answer the question.

The Florida senator continues to be hammered by members of the media for not disassociating himself from the GOP nominee, who he blasted during the presidential primary season, but is now backing because he says Trump is preferable to a Hillary Clinton presidency.

On “This Week in South Florida” on Sunday, Miami WLPG-TV host Michael Putney blasted Rubio as a “smart, talented guy who earned our respect when he first sought elected office,” but “now it seems he’ll do or say anything to stay in office, even swallow his pride and vote for a presidential candidate he clearly detests, all to advance his own political ambitions.”

Rubio said when it comes to Trump, he’s letting such criticism roll off of him.

“I’ve talked about that race repeatedly. People know how I feel about it,” he said regarding his continuing support for a Trump presidency. “I’m focused on the Senate race. If people want to continue talking about other things, they certainly have the right, it’s a free country. We’re blessed to have such freedoms in this country.”

“We’ve reached this point in America where people hate each other because of who they’re voting for,” Rubio later said, alluding to how divisive the Clinton-Trump race has become. “People hate each other because of what bumper sticker they have on their car. We’ve got to back away a little bit from that. We should feel passionately about our issues, but ultimately we all have to share the same country. There is no scenario where half of us do better and the other half does worse — that’s not a country that works. We can all be better off, and we should be able to disagree on political issues while still working on issues that we agree on.”

Rubio has spoken critically for years about Hillary Clinton, prompting FloridaPolitics to ask the senator if he could work effectively with her if the two of them both won on Nov. 8?

“When she agrees with me,” he immediately quipped. “I’ll look forward to working with her.”

He then went on to say the majority of his major legislation passed in his six years in the Senate have had major buy-in from Democrats, referring specifically to his “Girls Count Act” with New Hampshire’s Jeanne Shaheen (that will direct current U.S. foreign aid to support the rights of women and girls in developing countries by working to establish birth registries in their countries) and proposed higher education legislation with Virginia’s Mark Warner.

“When we agree on something, I enjoy working with people who I disagree with on other issues,” he said.

Rubio was scheduled to then attend a forum on the opioid crisis with Congressman Vern Buchanan in Bradenton.

 

Mitch Perry Report for 10.17.16 — Will recent experience play a factor in tonight’s U.S. Senate debate?

Floridians will get their first chance to observe Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy in the same room together when they engage in their first debate of Florida’s U.S. Senate contest in Orlando tonight.

Trailing by an average of around five percentage points through all of the polling, Murphy needs to have a big performance in him to begin to narrow that gap, especially with so many people already voting on every day in early mail voting.

First impressions matter — this the first time many Floridians will ever have seen Murphy (other than in commercials depicting him as the worst congressman in the country who lies about his resume). But if he can convincingly portray Rubio as an absentee senator who still isn’t interested in fulfilling a six-year term, he might score some points.

But if you were going to make a prediction beforehand, you’d have to like the Republican Senator’s chances. He’s much more battle tested on the debate stage, having participated in more than a dozen high-stake debates over the past year during his unsuccessful run for president (Yes, OK, there was that one moment in Manchester, New Hampshire with Chris Christie, but let’s forget about that for a moment).

And Murphy’s experience on the debate stage? Not much, lately.

You might recall back in July where Murphy was frustrating his Democratic primary opponents, Alan Grayson and Pam Keith, by avoiding to commit to a debate. After domestic-violence allegations made against Grayson from his ex-wife went public, Murphy said his opponent didn’t deserve “the platform,” and opted to not engage in any debates.

Some people (OK, me, for one) thought that was a bad idea on a number of fronts, one of them being that going ahead and conducting such a debate could help prep him for his ultimate confrontation with Rubio.

He opted out. Was that a mistake? We’ll know more by 8 this evening.

And will there only be two men on the stage in Orlando tonight? Independent candidate Steven Machat is back in court this morning to see if he and the other handful of independents can get on the debate stage in Orlando tonight.

In other news …

At a candidates forum Saturday, two Tampa City Council District 7 candidates got into it on the issue of the police.

The PPP survey released Friday showed Hillary Clinton with just a four-percentage point lead over Donald Trump in Florida, though his favorable/unfavorable rankings are tanking and hers are improving.

The Hillsborough County Public Transportation Commission has been besieged by for years, but now it’s their boss, Kyle Cockream, making headlines for all the wrong reasons.

 

With Patrick Murphy’s campaign, has the DSCC lost their minds?

Up until a few weeks ago, one could argue that the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee had been doing a reasonably good job in the Sunshine State.

One could even make the point that in a presidential year, one most likely to bring a D pickup, the DSCC had positioned themselves pretty well to take back Marco Rubio’s seat.

It began with a few elbows to the side of Alan Grayson’s head and continued with a strong centrist positioning of Patrick Murphy.

By most accounts, Florida was in a relatively strong position, at a minimum, to compete for this highly prized U.S. Senate seat.

With the GOP presidential nominee bottoming out, thanks to an awful debate performance — as well as his “is this mic on?” eye-opener — the situation could only get better for Murphy.

Add to that a disclosure that Trump’s companies traded with Cuba, and there should be a noticeable down-ballot impact, turning out a core South Florida voting constituency.

One would think the Rubio versus Murphy race is in play, with a Murphy victory more than just an academic possibility.

With a statewide polling average (according to RealClearPolitics.com) showing the better-known Marco Rubio at only 2 points above the lesser-known Murphy (Rubio is still below 50 percent), one would also think the DSCC smells blood and is going to pounce.

One would think.

Over the past week, there have been developing reports that essentially show national Democrats are walking away from Murphy.

That makes absolutely no sense.

For starters, helping keep Murphy afloat helps the top of the ticket. And while this may be shockingly obvious, it needs to be said: If HRC wins Florida, she is POTUS.

Helping the undercard has an up-ballot effect, although not a large one.

It’s not like I am suggesting they support a down-ballot candidate in a deep red state.

Furthermore, help could be nested in a few swing congressional seats to (at least) weaken Paul Ryan’s grip on the House. It would be money very well spent.

Oh, and did I mention, they could also help make Patrick Murphy a U.S. Senator?

So with a close U.S. Senate race, a few potential congressional pickups and the big electoral college swing-state prize … the DSCC walks away.

Really?

In my not-so-humble opinion; that is insane.

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