Drew Wilson, Author at Florida Politics - Page 2 of 192

Drew Wilson

Drew Wilson covers legislative campaigns and fundraising for Florida Politics. He is a former editor at The Independent Florida Alligator and business correspondent at The Hollywood Reporter. Wilson, a University of Florida alumnus, covered the state economy and Legislature for LobbyTools and The Florida Current prior to joining Florida Politics.

Harry Barkett, Jeff Vinik hosting Dana Young fundraiser Tuesday

Amalie Oil Co. exec Harry Barkett and Tampa Bay Lightning owner Jeff Vinik will help boost Republican state Sen. Dana Young’s re-election bid with a fundraising reception in Tampa this week.

The Tuesday evening event will be held at the home of Barkett and his wife, Carmen, while Vinik’s wife, Penny, is also listed on the host committee. Supporters interested in attending the event, slated to run from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., can RSVP with Kristin Lamb by emailing Kristin@FLFStrategies.com or calling 850-339-5354.

Young was elected to Senate District 18 in 2016, but due to Florida courts approving new maps for the Florida Senate she and other Senators in even-numbered districts were only elected to two-year terms.

She is facing a tough challenge from House Minority Leader Janet Cruz, who shelved her Hillsborough County Commission bid to enter the Senate race in mid-April. The most recent poll of the race shows Cruz with a slim advantage in the northwestern Hillsborough district, which covers much of Tampa. Prior polls have shown the two women jockeying in the purple district.

The Florida Democratic Party sees SD 18 as one of its top targets for a flip. Other than South Florida’s SD 36, where David Perez won the Democratic primary to challenge Republican state Rep. Manny Diaz, SD 18 is the only district Democrats are after that voted for Hillary Clinton two years ago.

Young has vastly outraised Cruz, however, and the Florida Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee, the PAC chaired by incoming Senate President Bill Galvano, has much deeper pockets than the equivalent fundraising arm supporting Democratic state Senate campaigns.

As of Oct. 5, Cruz had raised about $934,000 between her campaign account and affiliated political committee, Building the Bay PC, with about $115,000 of that cash banked due to a spree of media buys and contributions to the Florida Democratic Party, which has provided her campaign with a large amount of “in-kind” support.

Young has amassed $870,000 in hard money and still has $600,000 of that money in the bank. Young formed her PAC, Friends of Dana Young, well before the 2018 election cycle, but had another $600,000 in that account at the end of the early October reporting period. Like her opponent, much of her committee cash has been funneled to the FRSCC.

The fundraiser invitation is below.

Dana Young Fundraiser 10.16.2018

Matt Caldwell adds $277K, Nikki Fried $218K in Ag. Commish race

Lehigh Acres Republican state Rep. Matt Caldwell reeled in another $277,000 for his bid to succeed Adam Putnam as Agriculture Commissioner, but Democratic nominee Nikki Fried kept it competitive with a $218,000 haul for the first week of October.

Nearly $97,000 of the fresh receipts reported by Caldwell were deposited in his campaign account, with another $180,000 heading to his soft money account, Friends of Matt Caldwell. The committee’s rake was buoyed by a $100,000 check from Florida Jobs PAC, a political committee tied to the Florida Chamber of Commerce.

The Chamber-affiliated committee chipped $100,000 into Caldwell’s prior finance report and has given nearly $300,000 thus far.

Caldwell emerged from the four-way Agriculture Commissioner primary with a plurality of the vote, although it left a major dent in his war chest.

Since entering the Cabinet race last year, the four-term lawmaker has raised $1.28 million in hard money and had amassed another $2.8 million in committee cash, including some funds raised prior to launching his statewide campaign. As of Oct. 5, he had a combined $1.05 million in the bank.

Chipping away at that balance in the new report was a $300,000 contribution to the Republican Party of Florida, which has provided Caldwell’s campaign with around $30,000 worth of “in-kind” support to date.

Unlike Caldwell, Fried announced her campaign shortly before the filing deadline and faced only a light challenge in the Democratic primary. Her early October reports showed about $45,000 in hard money fundraising and another $173,000 in contribs for her political committee, Florida Consumers First.

That tally brings her overall fundraising to the precipice of the $900,000 mark. She had a combined $453,000 in the bank on Oct. 5.

Topping the new committee report was a $100,000 check from the Aldara Impact Fund, a Denver-based organization listed as a voter education and advocacy group. Fried, a medical marijuana lobbyist, also cashed a $25,000 check from Jake Bergmann, the CEO of medical cannabis distributor Surterra Wellness.

Caldwell’s continued lead in the money race came alongside some other good news: An endorsement from Americans for Prosperity-Action Florida.

“During his time in the legislature, State Representative Caldwell was a vocal leader for critical priorities, particularly as a strong advocate for reforming the Criminal Justice System, Cronyism, Labor, and Spending,” said the orgs senior adviser, Chris Hudson.

“If elected, we expect Matt Caldwell to lead on reforming corporate welfare, advocating for sound criminal justice reforms, and protecting our quality of life – and that’s why we’re urging all Floridians to join us by making him the next Agricultural Commissioner of Florida.”

In spite of the large fundraising deficit, recent polling published by the Florida Chamber of Commerce shows Fried with a 5-point lead over Caldwell, 42-37 percent. That edge narrowly beats the poll’s margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.

slot machines - gambling

Gambling amendment will pass, AIF poll suggests

The constitutional amendment to limit gambling expansion in the Sunshine State has the support of a supermajority of voters, according to a new poll conducted by Associated Industries of Florida.

The AIF poll, obtained by Florida Politics, found 70 percent of likely general election voters are in favor of Amendment 3, also known as the “Voter Control of Gambling in Florida” amendment.

Constitutional amendments need at least 60 percent approval to be added to the state’s governing document.

Only 15 percent of voters said they were planning to vote against the amendment on Election Day, with the other 15 percent of voters presumably undecided.

The new measure shows the anti-gambling expansion amendment has the same level of support as it did at the first of the month. The new results also continue a streak of positive results for Amendment 3, which would give Florida voters the “exclusive right to decide whether to authorize casino gambling” in the state.

A recent poll from the Florida Chamber of Commerce found 54 percent of voters supported the amendment while 28 percent said they planned to vote “no” and 18 percent were undecided.

AIF Poll - gambling amendment

The AIF poll was conducted Oct. 8-10 and has a margin of error of 3.1 percentage points. It’s unclear what is the sample size for the poll.

Voters In Charge, the political committee sponsoring the amendment, has received a heavy amount of support from Disney and the Seminole Tribe of Florida, who both have a stake in limiting the expansion of gambling in the state.

As of Oct. 5, it had raised $36.75 million with more than $19.5 million of that cash coming from Disney Worldwide Services, while the Seminole Tribe has pitched in about $17.8 million. The committee is chaired by John Sowinski, the president of No Casinos, which has accounted for most of the rest of the funding.

Voters in Charge has $6.17 million in the bank.

A pair of committees opposing the amendment — Citizens for the Truth About Amendment 3 and Vote NO on 3 — have raised a combined $7 million as of Oct. 5, with the majority of their support coming from casino interests such as West Flagler Associates, the parent company of Miami’s Magic City Casino.

Citizens for the Truth About Amendment 3 has nearly $4.2 million on hand thanks in part to a $1.4 million infusion from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, while Vote NO on 3 finished the Oct. 5 reporting period with $77,000 in the bank.

Amendment 3 is one of several measures that will go before voters in the 2018 general election.

GULF POWER

Gulf Power crews making inroads to Panama City Beach outages

Panhandle utility company Gulf Power announced Sunday evening that all of its Panama City Beach customers west of Highway 79 have been restored.

The company said the announcement represents power restoration to more than 10,000 customers living in that area of the city, which was one of the hardest hit by Hurricane Michael. The update came a few hours after the utility company announced that it’s on track to restore power to all customers affected by the storm by midnight on Oct. 24.

Customers residing east of Highway 79 to the Hathaway Bridge in Panama City Beach can expect their power to be restored by midnight, Oct. 15.

“This is a massive, well-coordinated effort to bring power and hope back to these communities, families and businesses. We are pleased to be making steady progress as thousands more lights are shining tonight,” said Adrianne Collins, vice president of power delivery. “It is great to reach this milestone, and we will not stop until the work is complete.”

In the wake of the Category 4 hurricane, Gulf Power’s nearly 1,200 employees and 300 contractors were been joined by a platoon of out-of-state linemen and electrical professionals. The company said Sunday evening that it now has more than 6,000 people working around the clock to restore power.

Gulf Power also warned ahead of the Michael’s landfall that it expected much of its infrastructure would have to be rebuilt as it worked on restoring power to its customers.

It said that effort could take “weeks,” and according to the timely it unveiled earlier Sunday, it expects to get its ginal customer back on the grid just over two weeks after the hurricane ravaged the Panhandle.

Gulf Power’s outage status as of 5 p.m. Central is as follows: 58,171 customers in Bay County, where Panama City is located are still without power; 4,935 customers in Washington County are without power; and Holmes and Jackson counties are each home to about 500 customers apiece who have not had their power restored.

The current timetable estimates Bonifay, Chipley, Caryville, Graceville and Campbellton customers will be back online by midnight, Oct. 17; Vernon, Sunny Hills and the surrounding area can expect their power back by midnight, Oct. 18; and those in the Cypress and Apalachee areas with a Sneads, Fla., mailing address should be back on the grid by midnight, Oct. 19.

The final batch of customers on the timetable — those living in Downtown Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Lynn Haven, Youngstown and surrounding areas — should have their power back by midnight, Oct. 24.

All Gulf Power customers Escambia, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton counties have had their lights come back on. Gulf Power customers can monitor power restoration progress in their area through the company’s FacebookTwitter and Instagram feeds as well as its outage map.

Gulf Power on track for 100 percent power restoration by Oct. 24

Panhandle utility company Gulf Power announced Sunday that it’s on track to restore power to all customers affected by Hurricane Michael by midnight on Oct. 24.

“Hurricane Michael was an unprecedented storm, and Gulf Power is on a mission to ensure an unprecedented response,” said Gulf Power head Stan Connally. “We know that our customers are counting on us, so they can begin rebuilding their lives. We are working safely and aggressively around the clock to get the lights back on.”

In the wake of the Category 4 hurricane, Gulf Power’s nearly 1,200 employees and 300 contractors were joined by a platoon of out-of-state linemen and electrical professionals who have been working around the clock to get the tens of thousands of Panhandle residents who lost power back online.

The company also warned ahead of the monstrous storm making landfall that it expected much of its infrastructure would have to be rebuilt as it worked on restoring power to its customers. It said that effort could take “weeks,” and the newly defined timeline will get the last customer back on the grid just over two weeks after the Hurricane Michael ravaged the Panhandle.

Gulf Power’s Sunday afternoon update included a more granular power restoration timeline.

According to their release, Panama City Beach west of Highway 79 is estimated to be fully restored by midnight, Oct. 14; the lights should come back on in Panama City Beach east of Highway 79 to the Hathaway Bridge by midnight, Oct. 15; areas north of I-10 such as Bonifay, Chipley, Caryville and Campbellton are on track to be restored by midnight, Oct. 17; Vernon, Sunny Hills and the surrounding areas south of I-10 are should be back online by midnight, Oct. 18; the Cypress and Apalachee areas with a mailing address of Sneads, Fla., are estimated to be restored by midnight, Oct. 19.

The last areas on the timeline were those hardest hit by the storm: Downtown Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Lynn Haven, Youngstown, and the surrounding areas. If the current timeline holds, customers in those areas can expect their power to be back online by midnight, Oct. 24.

As of Sunday, power had been restored to all customers in Escambia, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties. There are still nearly 61,000 customers without power in Bay County and nearly 5,000 in neighboring Washington County, with small pockets of outages in Holmes, Jackson, and Walton counties.

Gulf Power customers can monitor power restoration progress in their areas through the company’s FacebookTwitter and Instagram feeds as well as its outage map.

A map of the power restoration timeline is below.

Gulf Power EstimatedRestorationTimes-Map-101418_Page_1

Gulf Power

Gulf Power says 4,400 power pros working 24/7 on Panhandle restoration

The platoon of power professionals working to get electricity restored in the Florida Panhandle has jumped to 4,400 according to Gulf Power, the region’s major utility company.

In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Michael, more than 400,000 utility customers in Florida were without power, and about a third of those were Gulf Power Customers. The company quickly got 25,000 customers back online and announced Thursday night that it had hit the 32,000-customer mark, including more than 4,000 in the Panama City area.

In its Friday morning update, Gulf Power said crews have restored power to more than 37,000 customers and more than 4,400 storm personnel have been mobilized and have already begun working in the hardest hit areas. The larger bucket trucks had to wait to be deployed until after cleanup crews had cleared roadways of debris.

“All of our crews are out working and customers will be seeing more bucket trucks in the hardest hit areas,” Gulf Power spox Jeff Rogers said. “We also have drones and helos in the air today to provide us with more detailed reports of our system by the end of today.”

The company said it has 1,000 power poles ready to go into the ground with another 800 expected to be delivered today. Those recon flights have given the company a look at more than 300 miles of transmission corridors.

“This was an unprecedented storm, and our customers will see an unprecedented response from Gulf Power,” said Rogers.

To that end, the company said thousands of storm personnel from around the country arrived in the Panama City area Thursday for a total of 4,400 working the restoration and rebuilding process. Restoration crews will be on the job 24/7, and the company has set up seven staging sites to house those crews.

Gulf Power warned customers before Michael’s landfall that it was expecting to have to rebuild much of the electrical system in the Panama City area as it worked on restoring power. The company reiterated Friday that those in the hardest hit areas should prepare to be without power for weeks.

Bay County, where Panama City is located, has seen the number of outages shrink by another 4,000 or so since last night, though as of 11 a.m. CDT, Gulf Power said there were still 92,692 Bay County customers without power.

Others waiting for the lights to come back on include 2,100 customers in Holmes County, 1,363 in Jackson County, 3,468 in Walton County and 6,493 in Washington County. Escambia, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties have been completely restored since Thursday night.

Gulf Power customers can monitor progress in their areas through the company’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts as well as its outage map.

Jimmy Patronis

Jimmy Patronis outraises Jeremy Ring tenfold in early October

Current CFO Jimmy Patronis scored another fundraising win for the week of Sept. 29-Oct. 5 with nearly $500,000 in receipts between his campaign and Treasure Florida political committee.

The Panama City Republican was appointed to the CFO job last year by Gov. Rick Scott and is the lone incumbent Cabinet member running for re-election in the fall.

He’s up against Democrat and former state Sen. Jeremy Ring, who raised about $41,000 between his two accounts during the weeklong reporting cycle.

Hard money accounted for $131,000 of Patronis’ $493,000 haul. That cash came in across 107 contributions with the average donor chipping in $1,223. The donor sheet included 28 contributions measuring in at $3,000, which is the maximum allowable campaign contribution for a statewide election.

The campaign dollars were paired with $362,000 in committee cash and included a $125,000 check from Florida Prosperity Fund, a political committee tied to business group Associated Industries of Florida, and $100,000 from Florida Jobs PAC, which is tied to the Florida Chamber of Commerce.

The Chamber endorsed Patronis for a full term back in May.

The inflow was outstripped by spending, which has ramped up considerably during the sprint to Election Day. The weeklong reports showed a combined $775,000 in expenditures, including a $750,000 contribution to the Florida Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee.

FRSCC is the cash rich GOP affiliated committee chaired by incoming Senate President Bill Galvano that’s charged with supporting Republican state Senate candidates.

Patronis has raised nearly $6.4 million for his CFO bid — $2.18 million of it through his official campaign account and another $4.2 million through his political committee. As of Oct. 5, the two accounts had a combined $2.94 million in the bank.

Ring, for his part, tacked on about $26,000 in campaign cash and another $15,000 via his affiliated political committee, Florida Action Fund PC. His report showed 54 campaign contribs, including a quartet at the $3,000 level, with the average donor chipping in about $480.

The committee report listed one contribution: A $15,000 check from Florida Alliance for Better Government, a political committee chaired by Democratic political consultant Screven Watson.

Ring’s ledger also showed $214,000 in expenditures, including $75,000 to the Florida Democratic Party; $113,384 in payments to Counterpoint Messaging for digital ad buys; $8,500 to Johnson Campaigns for consulting work; as well as numerous smaller contributions.

To date, Ring has raised about $1.4 million between the two accounts, with $192,000 of that sum coming from the former Yahoo executive’s own checking account as a candidate loan. On Oct. 5, Ring had $177,000 at the ready.

Whether the new round of campaign finance reports will lead Patronis and ring to update their dueling websites dishing dirt on dubious donors remains to be seen. Still, despite the wide gulf in fundraising, numerous polls have show Ring leading Patronis in the most low-key statewide race of the 2018 cycle.

A recent survey by left-leaning Public Policy Polling finds 40 percent of voters supporting Ring, compared to 34 backing Patronis, with 26 percent of voters still undecided. The most recent round of polling from the Florida Chamber of Commerce showed the two men tied 38-38 percent among likely voters with 20 percent undecided.

Patronis and Ring will be the only names printed on the Nov. 6 general election ballot. A write-in candidate, Richard Dembinsky, is also vying for the seat.

RON DESANTIS

Chicago billionaire fuels $8M week for Ron DeSantis

Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis raked in more than $8.25 million between his campaign and committee during the first week of October, which goes down as his most prolific fundraising week of the election cycle.

DeSantis raised nearly $1.2 million in hard money, including 125 contributions for the maximum campaign donation of $3,000. In all, his report showed more than 7,500 contributions with two-thirds of those donors chipping in $50 or less — before the new report, DeSantis had considerably lagged behind Democratic opponent Andrew Gillum when it came to “small dollar” donors.

The rest of the monster haul came in through DeSantis’ affiliated PAC, Friends of Ron DeSantis, which posted more than $7 million in receipts during the reporting period covering Sept. 29 through Oct. 5.

The weekly donor list was around 150 names long, but the name at the top, Kenneth C. Griffin, was responsible for the vast majority of that haul. Griffin is a Chicago-based investor, hedge fund manager and philanthropist who is also serving as the national finance chair for New Republican PAC, the political committee fueling Gov. Rick Scott‘s campaign to unseat U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson.

Griffin cut DeSantis a check for $5 million on Oct. 3. The next-largest was a quartet of $100,000 contributions — one apiece from Joe Anderson III of Old Town, Thomas Peterffy of Palm Beach, David McNeil of Hinsdale, Illinois, and The Middlesex Corporation.

The reports also showed a massive amount of spending, with nearly $7 million exiting DeSantis’ war chest. The bulk of that cash, $6.5 million, went to the Republican Party of Florida. RPOF provided the DeSantis campaign with $723,000 worth of “in-kind” support during the week.

Though DeSantis scored a fundraising coup, Gillum didn’t flame out.

The Tallahassee Mayor has so far reported $3.3 million in committee fundraising during the same stretch via Forward Florida. Team Gillum has yet to upload their new campaign finance report, but their last report showed $1.7 million in hard money, with nearly 12,500 donations, 219 max checks and a whopping 9,800 contributions of $50 or less.

Democratic Governors Association topped the committee ledger with a $1 million check. Florida-based philanthropist Marsha Laufer, the wife of Henry Laufer, chipped in another $500,000, bringing her overall contributions to Team Gillum up to $780,000. Billionaire Michael Bloomberg, a possible 2020 presidential candidate, sent over $250,000, while the Barbara Stiefel Trust and Miami law firm Podhurst Orseck PA each wrote $100,000 checks.

Committee spending came in at $4.2 million for the week, nearly all of that cash heading to the Florida Democratic Party.

As of Oct. 5, Gillum had a combined $7.6 million on hand while DeSantis had $6.6 million in the bank between his two accounts.

Gillum and running mate Chris King face Republican nominee Ron DeSantis and his LG pick, state Rep. Jeannette Nuñez, in the Nov. 6 general election.

Every poll since Gillum and DeSantis became their parties’ nominees has shown Gillum in the lead, though most polls have put his edge within the margin of error. According to a public poll aggregation compiled by RealClearPolitics, Gillum as a 3.7 percentage point edge with less than a month to go before Election Day.

Gulf Power Crews

Gulf Power has restored power to 4K customers in Panama City

Panhandle utility company Gulf Power announced Thursday night that it has started making progress in its power restoration and rebuilding process in Panama City, one of the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Michael.

The company has restored power to more than 32,000 customers overall — an increase of 7,000 from its Thursday afternoon update — and more than 4,000 of those customers reside in Panama City. There are still nearly 97,000 customers without power in Bay County, where Panama City is located.

Those efforts were helped along by more than 3,000 storm personnel from across the country who have arrived in Panama City in the wake of the storm, augmenting the company’s 1,187 employees and 330 contractors.

“This was an unprecedented storm, and our customers will see an unprecedented response from Gulf Power,” said Gulf Power spokesperson Jeff Rogers. “The destruction we’ve seen so far to this community and our electrical system is devastating — we’re seeing damage across our system, including distribution lines, transmission lines, and substations.

“Gulf Power has a strong history of restoring power — both at home and away assisting other energy providers,” Rogers continued. “We have the resources we need for crews to begin repairs and we have great partnerships with state and local officials — as well as other energy providers — to help us get access to some of the hardest hit areas.”

As the company has warned in past updates, Gulf Power said it would take weeks and require much of its infrastructure to be rebuilt before power is fully restored to all customers — and that process can only get fully underway when the roads are cleared.

“We’re heartbroken for our customers and our teammates who live in and near the Panama City area,” Rogers said. “This is the type of storm that changes lives — so aside from restoring power to our customers quickly and safely, our focus in the coming days and weeks will also be to help restore hope to these communities and help give them a sense of normalcy as soon as possible.”

In the meantime, crews have inspected 38 out of 45 substations in the Panama City area and have begun inspecting distribution lines — which carry electricity from substations to customers — and started replacing poles, lines, transformers, and more.

Once roads are clear, larger bucket trucks will be able to make it to repair sites that Gulf Power has been able to identify through the use of drones.

Gulf Power also said all customers in Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa counties are back online. It also said all of its Walton County customers would have power again by the end of Thursday night.

Customers can monitor progress in their areas through the company’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts as well as its outage map.

As of 8 p.m. Thursday, a total of 109,287 Gulf Power customers were without power. In addition to the widespread outages in Bay County, 6,252 are without power in Washington County; 2,520 without power in Holmes County; and 1,344 without power in Jackson County.

Andrew Gillum

Direct mail roundup: Andrew Gillum will ‘take money from hardworking families’

Americans for Prosperity Action, or AFP-Action, said it was rolling out a direct mail campaign opposing Democratic gubernatorial nominee Andrew Gillum earlier this month, and those ads are starting to hit mailboxes statewide.

The mail campaign is one component of AFP-Action’s anti-Gillum ad blitz. The Koch-backed political committee also made a digital ad buy labeling the Tallahassee Mayor as “too extreme for Florida.”

The front of the mailer features a picture of Gillum on a TV set and says, “Breaking news: Andrew Gillum says ‘we will increase taxes.’”

“What will Andrew Gillum’s tax increases do? Hurt Florida’s economy. Hit small business. Take money from hardworking families,” the flipside says. “Change the channel. Vote AGAINST Andrew Gillum on November 6th.”

The mailers appear to be referencing statements by Gillum that he would raise taxes on businesses to pay for his education priorities. His plan would increase Florida’s corporate income tax rate from 5.5 percent to 7.75 percent in order to pay for a proposed $1 billion increase in the education budget to pay for increases in teacher pay.

When AFP-Action announced the ad campaign its senior adviser, Chris Hudson, said that if Gillum was elected and his education and health care priorities were implemented, it would “take away your health insurance and cut access to Floridians on Medicaid by expanding a broken system” and “destroy successful programs that give students a hand up in achieving their goals.”

AFP-Action contends that the state is “heading in the right direction,” however Gillum has claimed that even though the Florida has a low unemployment rate, individuals are being forced to work “two to three jobs to make ends meet.”

Gillum and running mate Chris King face Republican nominee Ron DeSantis and his LG pick, state Rep. Jeannette Nuñez, in the Nov. 6 general election.

Every poll since Gillum and DeSantis became their parties’ nominees has shown Gillum in the lead, though most polls have put his edge within the margin of error. According to an aggregation of public polls compiled by RealClearPolitics, Gillum as a 3.7 percentage point edge with less than a month to go before Election Day.

AFP-Action’s mailer is below.

AFP Gillum

AFP Gillum

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